REVIEW: Songs for a Future Generation (Lights Out Theatre)

Dancing to its own tune!

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Lights Out Theatre presents

Songs for a Future Generation

 

Written by Joe Tracz
Directed by Mary Rose O’Connor
At EP Theatre, 1820 S. Halsted

Thru March 13th  (more info)

By Katy Walsh

What does the future hold? The good news is dance parties! The bad news is no lobster! Lights Out Theatre Company presents Songs for a Future Generation. Set in the future, in a galaxy far, far away, Songs for a Future Generation imagines the SFAFG1continued challenges of hosting successful theme parties, searching for ‘the one’, and saving the… rock lobster. It is present day themes with science fiction twists. The party hosts are clones. The love seeker is a time traveler. The seafood advocate is an  intergalactic fugitive. Songs for a Future Generation is multiple stories unfolding during a series of dance parties. Watching the show is like being a wallflower, you are delighted by the rocking bash but uncertain how to engage in what’s happening.

The cast rockets with pure octane energy. The best moments are the choreographed (Anna Lucero) dance sequences involving the whole cast. The ensemble is perfectly in-sync in the dance. They bop with such enthusiasm, it feels like you are gawkers at the cool kids’ party rather than an audience at a play. As Marika clones, Andrea DeCamp, Hailey Wineland and Annie Lydia Litchfield do a wonderful job being unique while being in unison. Jaclyn Keough (The Kid), looking like an androgynous “It’s James Dean,” was fascinating to watch in her antics to rescue the rock lobster. Jonathan Matteson (Error) is the lovestruck time traveler bringing old school charm to a hedonistic generation. The costumes (Bradley Burgess-Donaleski) and hairstyles are a fun, sexy, hot mess.

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For any dance party to be successful, certain elements must be present. For Songs for a Future Generation, there is definitely the right music, dance and energy. The buzz killer is often straddling the party balance between “too much” and “not enough.” In the dance numbers, keeping the large cast in step together is impressive. In scenes, where the action is low and the cast is hugging the walls, the stage’s emptiness is “nobody came to my party” awkward. The script also becomes party victim to “too much” or “not enough.” Although there are multiple storylines to follow, the content is light and frothy. The plotlines are basic and predictable. The rave is definitely the boogie. Life is a collection of celebrations. Every festivity doesn’t have to be legendary. Treat Songs for a Future Generation like the eye candy at a party, he’s pretty to look at but a strong connection isn’t necessarily present. It’s a fun hour without any emotional or intellectual commitment. Sometimes, it is just about dancing!

Rating: ★★★

Running Time: One hour and twenty-five minutes (no intermission, 10 minute delayed start).

3 WORDS: A graduate of the Arthur Murray Dance Academy, Shawn describes the experience as “kids having fun!”

WAITING FOR THE SHOW

Traveling via CTA from Lakeview to Chinatown, I was astonished by the quick thirty minute commute (Bus #11 and Red Line). The extra time came in handy at Moon Palace Restaurant, 216 W. Cermak. The restaurant staff seemed surprised at the high volume Thursday night. The food didn’t arrive in its usual swift timing plus there was a several minute interlude between the arrival of my salt and pepper fish and Shawn’s Moon Palace chicken. The fish dish is my long time Moon Palace favorite! It seems a little less peppery than my memory craved. Still, a tasty meal topped with an almond AND fortune cookie! Reading my fortune “You are always welcome in any gathering,” I bop down the street to the dance party at EP Theatre.


MISSION STATEMENT:

Lights Out Theatre Company is an ensemble of multi-disciplined artists dedicated to serving Chicago audiences with fresh and provocative theatrical productions. United under the common goal to bring new ideas, voices, and audiences into the theatre, LOTC seeks to create works that are relevant, risky, and transcendent of tradition and genre.

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