Extensions: The Cabinet, Pillowman, Harper Regan, The Long Red Road

cabinet 

The Cabinet  – extended through April 4th

Redmoon Theatre has announced an extension of their haunting and surreal production. The Cabinet,originally slated to close on March 7th, has now been extended through April 4th.  Tickets are available online or by calling (312) 850 – 8440. (Read our review ★★★½)

 

 

   

PmanLogo600 Pillowman – extended through March 16th

Due to popular demand, Redtwist Theatre’s smash hit Pillowman, by Martin McDonagh and directed by Kimberly Senior, has extended its run through March 16, 2010, with a further extension imminent (fyi: Pillowman has been running strong since November 2009!).  All performances at the Redtwist blackbox space, 1044 W. Bryn Mawr.  Tickets, priced at $22 – $27, are currently on sale.  (See our Pillowman review here ★★★)

 

   

Harper Regan – extended through March 28th

On Thursday, January 21st, the Steep Theatre’s U.S. premiere of Simon StephensHarper Regan opened. Word hit the street by Friday and the first reviews hit the stands Saturday morning. By noon on Monday the 24th, every performance of the six-week run and the one week extension had sold out.  In response to this terrific demand, Steep has announce additional performances of this smash hit. An unprecedented 16 performances have been added to this already extended show – now running through March 28th.  For ticket info here. (our review here)

   

 

LongRedRoad_poster The Long Red Road extended through March 21st

Due to high demand for tickets, Goodman Theatre has extended its world-premiere production of The Long Red Road, a new play by Brett C. Leonard, directed by Philip Seymour Hoffman, by one week—now running February 13 through March 21, 2010. The cast of six remains intact for the extension week, including London’s stage and screen actor Tom Hardy, as well as Marcos Akiaten, Greta Honold, Chris McGarry, Fiona Robert and Katy Sullivan.

 

   

 

REVIEW: Beautiful City (Theatre Mir)

Solid cast punctuates this urban fairytale

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Theatre Mir presents

Beautiful City

 

Written by George F. Walker
Directed by
Rob Chambers
At Storefront Theatre, 66 E. Randolph,
thru April 3rd
(more info)

By Katy Walsh

“Make no little plans” is a phrase coined by Chicago’s infamous urban planner, Daniel Burnham. In Theatre Mir’s play Beautiful City, lead character Tony Raft embraces this philosophy despite opposition from his architect, a witch and the mob.  Performed at the Storefront Theatre in conjunction with DCA Theatre and the Beautiful_City10Chicago Department of Cultural Affairs, Beautiful City is the story of each person’s quest to get what they want by overcoming ‘the simple ugly truth.’ Tony wants a grandiose shopping mall. His mobster mama wants more money. His architect wants to be healed. The witch wants urban renewal and the freedom to dig through garbage. Beautiful City interconnects three families in an urban fairy tale of betrayal, greed and redemption.

The entire cast has been solidly constructed. Here are some of the pillar performances: Yosh Hayashi (Tony Raft) impresses with his vigorous audacity over a shopping mall obsession. Splendidly rotten in Steep Theatre’s Hollowlands, Hayashi exploits the humor in his every diabolical depiction. It’s Gilbert Gottfried as Hannibal Lector. Walking up and down stairs in 3 inch heels, Rachel Slavick (Mary Raft) is tough. Except for a wonderful salad thrashing scene, Slavick plays it stone faced cold. Mira Vasiljevic (Gina Mae Sabatini) contorts her look with an ongoing skunk face in her portrayal of the witch. Physically and vocally, Vasiljevic showcases her character as a bizarre source of life’s truth. She’s hilarious! C. Sean Piereman (Paul Gallagher) is the one to be rescued in this modern day fable. In the first few scenes, Piereman’s pain is so uncomfortably real, one feels the need to call 911. Other high energy moments of dramedy are Jeremy Kahn (Stevie Moore) as a fast-talking punk, Kristen Secrist (Jane Sabatini) as a wacky hospital volunteer, Kurt Brocker (Rolly Moore) as a desperate thug and Megan Kohl (Dian Black) as the confident gum -chewing cop. It is stellar acting wrapped up in Whitney McBride’s character-perfected costumes.

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Director Rob Chambers maximizes the physical space and the script to establish the framework of this adult fairy tale. Chambers is working from the foundation laid by playwright George F. Walker. Walker illustrates the issues of gentrification with an entertaining myth of mobsters verses witches. The parts are there for a solid built fortress. To nail it, Walker needs to sand it down for refinement. Some of the scenes are longer than necessary. In particular, a pivotal end scene is overly explanatory. This technique feels Hollywood-esque in “dumbing it down for the mainstream.” There are also some transitional moments of clunkiness, like, the scene where Paul is in the witch’s store. When did he decide to seek her out? It’s like realizing you are already in a room when you thought you were walking down a corridor. Walker’s blueprint needs a hallway connecting smaller rooms to more effectively imagine city dwelling. Nonetheless, even without a script renovation, Mir Theatre’s Beautiful City is an entertaining lesson of urban renewal for the entire community.

Making his own contribution to our city landscape, Frank Lloyd Wright says, “eventually, I think Chicago will be the most beautiful city left in the world.” Right with you, Frank!

Rating: ★★★

 

Post-show Discussions

  • Thursday, March 11, with cast and director Rob Chambers
  • Saturday, March 20, with Dr. Michael Bennett, executive director of DePaul University’s Egan Urban Center
  • Friday, March 26, with Al Gini, contributor at WBEZ Chicago Public Radio and professor of philosophy and business ethics at Loyola University, Chicago

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