REVIEW: Three Tall Women (Court Theatre)

  
  

Three strong women champion Albee’s tale of end-of-life regrets

  
  

Edward Albee’s Three Tall Women features Mary Beth Fisher (Woman B), Lois Markle (Woman A), Maura Kidwell (Woman C).  Photo by Michael Brosilow.

  
Court Theatre presents
   
Three Tall Women
  
Written by Edward Albee
Directed by
Charles Newell
at
Court Theatre, 5535 S. Ellis (map)
through Feb 13  |  tickets: $10-$50  |  more info

Reviewed by Barry Eitel

Edward Albee’s 1994 play Three Tall Women breathed new life into the legendary playwright’s career. Although works like Zoo Story and Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf were instant classics, many thought Albee had finished cranking out the good stuff by the 1990’s. The doubters were put in their place with this meditative piece, a half-exorcism, half-eulogy closely linked to Albee’s own experiences with his deceased adoptive mother. Finding himself king of the American absurdism hill again, Albee took home a Pulitzer prize and found receptive audiences for his later plays, which include The Goat, or Who is Silvia? and The Play About the Baby (both of which also garnered many awards).

Mary Beth Fisher (Woman B), Maura Kidwell (Woman C) and Lois Markle (Woman A). Photo by Michael BrosilowThree Tall Women examines a life, but with a fractured and multifaceted lens, Albee’s trademark style. The three women are really only different versions of one, an old former socialite on her deathbed. The woman, a semi-fictional representation of Albee’s own mother, lived a life rife with pleasures and regrets. She came from poverty and learned fast about love and society, and ended up a wife and mother (with heavy doses of infidelity and familial strife). Although the play eschews any neat moral, you leave the theatre with a new comprehension for how the seconds of life tick away.

The first act rolls along slowly. The protagonist, A (the remarkable Lois Markle), sits on her bed, recounting and rambling about her 90+ years of life experience. She is attended on by B (the also remarkable Mary Beth Fisher), who is some type of live-in nurse. Also in the room is C (Maura Kidwell), a lawyer’s assistant intent on getting to the bottom of some financial inaccuracies. The trio trade barbs and gems about life, but mostly they listen to the occasionally incoherent tales of A. Death is a constant presence, but it isn’t the main focus of all conversation. The first act characters dust the inevitability of death under the rug until right before intermission.

Dying, life, and regret become the center of Act Two. A’s condition has deteriorated. She lies in a bed, wired to monitors. However, Albee has the woman—or women—discuss her life in front of the body. A, B, and C are now several personifications of the same woman. C is the 26-year-old girl, B is the embittered 52-year-old spouse, and A is the finale of the woman’s life. They argue, teach, and advise. C can’t believe she becomes B, and B can’t imagine how she transforms into A. Yet they all face death together. The comatose A has a visit from her son (a lineless Joel Gross), which inspires completely different reactions from each incarnation.

Director Charles Newell assembled a shining group of women for his cast. Markle, who was referred by Albee himself, gives a magical, heartfelt performance. Fisher keeps up with her, packing her portrayal of B with sass and vulnerability. Kidwell stumbles in the first act, unable to give C the layers required. However, any young actress is going to look unpolished when placed on-stage with such seasoned performers as Markle and Fisher. But Kidwell picks it up after intermission and holds her own.

In general, the first act feels clunky and languid. Act Two has a completely different energy, and Newell isn’t afraid to try some risky staging. It pays off. The latter half is exponentially more engaging, especially with Fisher’s and Markle’s talents.

It really doesn’t matter much how biographical or fictional Three Tall Women actually is. Albee, Newell, and the cast find universal truths in the woman’s story. We all are going to die, no matter our age now. It is one thing about the future we can be sure of.

  
  
Rating: ★★★
  
  

Edward Albee’s Three Tall Women features Maura Kidwell (Woman C), Mary Beth Fisher (Woman B), and Lois Markle. Michael Brosilow.

  
  

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REVIEW: The Trinity River Plays (Goodman Theatre)

  
  

A hilarious yet complicated bouquet of family and tradition

  
 

Iris (Karen Aldridge) (center couch) returns home to find nothing has changed in the past 17 years as (l to r) Daisy (Jacqueline Williams), Rose (Penny Johnson Jerald) and Jasmine (Christiana Clark) dance around the house. Photo by Eric Y. Exit

  
Goodman Theatre presents
  
The Trinity River Plays
  
Written by Regina Taylor
Directed by Ethan McSweeny
at Goodman Theatre, 170 N. Dearborn (map)
through Feb 20  |  tickets: $25-$78  |  more info 

Reviewed by Katy Walsh

‘You don’t start a garden by digging. You start it by dreaming.’ Goodman Theatre presents the world premiere of The Trinity River Plays. Playwright Regina Taylor has penned three one act plays: Jarfly, Rain, and Ghoststory. The compilation follows Iris Spears from happy, precocious, awkward seventeen year-old to detached, reserved, successful thirty-six year old. Iris is a budding storyteller. Rose has nurtured her daughter’s growth from bulb to bloom. Aunt Daisy tends the hothouse in her sister’s absence. Cousin Jasmine pushes a little weed to get Iris to blossom. Deflowering! Jack (Samuel Ray Gates) comes over to thank Iris (Karen Aldridge) for helping him with his schoolwork. Photo by Brandon Thibodeaux.Iris pulls up her roots and transplants away from her family. Fifteen years later, a return home digs up buried secrets and withering relationships. The Trinity River Plays is a complicated and hilarious bouquet of family drama.

The playwright has picked distinct, rich characters for a colorful arrangement. Taylor’s dialogue is organic and natural. Under the direction of Ethan McSweeny, this talented cast IS family. The relations are the familiar and unexplainable ties that bind and sometimes suffocate. In the lead, Karen Aldridge (Iris) engages as a lovable geek. In Jarfly, Aldridge’s ability to connect as a confident, cock-eyed optimist makes her later severed linkage to home and self that much more tragic. At the end of Jarfly and Rain, Aldridge’s movements haunt with raw emotion. Bringing continuous comedy relief, Christiana Clark (Cousin Jasmine) is a delicious combination of grandiosity and audacity. Aided visually by Valerie Gladstone (wig and hair design) and Karen Perry (costume design), Clark is a hot mess! Bringing more humor, Jacqueline Williams (Aunt Daisy) cackles with the wise musings of a woman on psychotropic medication. Williams delivers one liners to sassy perfection. Not appearing until the second play, Penny Johnson Jerald (Iris’s mother Rose) gives a complex portrayal as estranged mother, loving sister and enabling aunt.

Jerald stays indifferent to Aldridge making the mom-daughter alienation difficult to understand. Without spoiling a plot point, a story shift helps Jerald to showcase a softer and playful side.

     
Daisy (Jacqueline Williams) tries to understand her niece while coping with her sister's illness. Photo by Eric Y. Exit. Jasmine (Christiana Clark) dreams of moving to New York City and becoming a famous dancer/choreographer.
Frank (Jefferson A. Russell) makes a surprise visit to see Iris at her Texas home. Photo by Eric Y. Exit. Karen Aldridge and Penny Johnson Jerald - Goodman Theatre Iris (Karen Aldridge) is reacquainted with her high school crush Frank (Samuel Ray Gates). Photo by Eric Y. Exit.

From entry into the theatre, it’s all about the garden. Scenic designer Todd Rosenthal has a 70’s ‘Brady Bunch’-like house as a backdrop. In front of it is a beautiful garden. An abundance of vibrant flowers is a delightful sight (especially during Chicago winters). And it’s real! Throughout the show, dirt is shoveled and flowers are planted. The garden is watered by hose and rain. The effect is impactful realism.

Playwright Regina Taylor has written and promoted The Trinity River Plays as three separate plays. In actuality, it’s one play about one family. Taylor’s solid family dysfunction is experienced the best possible way with a lot of laughter. Trying to keep The Trinity River Plays separate entities adds to the length and loose pacing. Scene transitions have prolonged black-outs that sometimes confuse as intermission cues. Pulling it together as “The Trinity River PLAY”  (singular!) will tighten up the action – including eliminating one of the two intermissions – allowing this work to bloom and flourish from daisies to rose bushes. I do love daisies but roses make a stronger statement.

  
  
Rating: ★★★
  
  

(l to r) Iris (Karen Aldridge) and Daisy (Jacqueline Williams) prepare dinner while Frank (Jefferson A. Russell) and Jack (Samuel Ray Gates) get acquainted in the yard. Photo by Eric Y. Exit

Trinity River Plays continues through February 20th, playing Wednesdays, Thursdays and Sundays at 7:30pm, Fridays and Saturdays at 8pm, and Thursdays, Saturdays and Sundays at 2pm.  Tickets are $25-$78.  Go to www.goodmantheatre.org for more info.

Running Time: Three hours and fifteen minutes, which includes two intermissions.

        
        

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