2011 Non-Equity Jeff Award Winners!

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2011 Non-Equity Jeff Award Recipients

Monday, June 6th 2011

32 different companies were recognized going into the 2011 non-Equity Joseph Jefferson Awards. The Hypocrites, Theo Ubique Cabaret Theatre and Lifeline Theatre had the most nominations. Redtwist Theatre was close behind while scoring 3 out of the 6 Best Play Production nominations. The non-equity Jeff Awards got off to a bang at the Park West Monday night with a lively Red Carpet show broadcast online prior (pictures), hosted by Eric Roach and Anderson Lawfer. The awards show was hosted by Kevin Bellie of Circle Theatre. It kicked off with a musical number from Theo Ubique’s Cats. After the parade of nominees, and a Lady Gaga bit performed by Bellie, the awards were doled out. The awards did not go off without a hitch, as the Best Director of a Musical was at first awkwardly announced incorrectly. Here’s how everything played out:

2011 NON-EQUITY JEFF AWARD RECIPIENTS

PRODUCTION / PLAY

Man from Nebraska Redtwist Theatre 

PRODUCTION / MUSICAL

Cabaret – The Hypocrites

DIRECTOR / PLAY

Jimmy McDermott   (Three Faces of Doctor Crippen, The Strange Tree Group)
James Palmer   (The Love of the Nightingale, Red Tape Theatre

DIRECTOR / MUSICAL

Matt Hawkins   (Cabaret, The Hypocrites)

ENSEMBLE

Shakespeare’s King Phycus, The Strange Tree Group w/ Lord Chamberlain’s Men

ACTOR IN A PRINCIPAL ROLE / PLAY

Chuck Spencer in Man from Nebraska, Redtwist Theatre

ACTOR IN A PRINCIPAL ROLE / MUSICAL

Andrew Mueller in Big River, Bohemian Theatre Ensemble

ACTRESS IN A PRINCIPAL ROLE / PLAY

Caroline Neff in Helen of Troy, Steep Theatre Company
Nicole Wiesner in First Ladies, Trap Door Theatre

ACTRESS IN A PRINCIPAL ROLE / MUSICAL

Jessie Fisher in Cabaret, The Hypocrites

ACTOR IN A SUPPORTING ROLE / PLAY

Brian Perry in Shining City, Redtwist Theatre

ACTOR IN A SUPPORTING ROLE / MUSICAL

Courtney Crouse in Big River, Bohemian Theatre Ensemble

ACTRESS IN A SUPPORTNG ROLE / PLAY

Sara Pavlak in Agnes of God, Hubris Productions

ACTRESS IN A SUPPORTING ROLE / MUSICAL OR REVUE

Kate Harris in Cabaret, The Hypocrites

NEW WORK

Emily Schwartz for The Three Faces of Doctor Crippen, The Strange Tree Group

NEW ADAPTATION

Robert Kauzlaric for Neverwhere, Lifeline Theatre

CHOREOGRAPHY

Brenda Didier for Cats, Theo Ubique Cabaret Theatre

ORIGINAL INCIDENTAL MUSIC

Chris Gingrich, Henry Riggs, Thea Lux, and Tara Sissom That Sordid Little Story,  The New Colony

MUSIC DIRECTION

Austin Cook for Some Enchanted Evening: The Songs of Rodgers and Hammerstein, Theo Ubique Cabaret Theatre

SCENIC DESIGN

Alan Donahue for Neverwhere, Lifeline Theatre

LIGHTING DESIGN

Jared Moore for No Exit, The Hypocrites

COSTUME DESIGN

Matt Guthier for Cats, Theo Ubique Cabaret Theatre
Alison Siple for Cabaret, The Hypocrites

SOUND DESIGN

Mikhail Fiksel for Neverwhere, Lifeline Theatre

ARTISTIC SPECIALIZATION

Glen Aduikas, Rick Buesing, Mike Fletcher, Salvador Garcia, Stuart Hecht, David Hyman, Terry Jackson, Don Kerste, Bruce Phillips, Al Schilling, Lisi Stoessel, Eddy Wright – Robot design and engineering for Heddatron, Sideshow Theatre Company

Izumi Inaba: Makeup Design for Cats, Theo Ubique Cabaret Theatre

  
  

Review: Next to Normal (Broadway in Chicago)

     
     

A harshly relevant, yet gloriously hopeful masterpiece

     
     

The cast of 'Next to Normal' - Clockwise from top: Curt Hansen, Jeremy Kushnier, Preston Sadleir, Emma Hunton, Asa Somers, and Alice Ripley

  
Broadway in Chicago presents
  
Next to Normal
  
Book/Lyrics by Brian Yorkey
Music by Tom Kitt
Directed by Michael Greif
at Bank of America Theatre, 18 W. Monroe (map)
through May 8  | 
tickets: $32 – $95  |  more info

Reviewed by Catey Sullivan

Last year, the Pulitzer Prize board took a look at the short list from the subcommittee that makes recommendations on who should win the coveted award for drama. The board tossed the recommendations out, and instead bestowed the Pulitzer on Next to Normal, a show that the recommending body didn’t even rate as a semi-finalist. In some circles, the decision was viewed as an autocratic move illustrating the limitations of an unchecked board. Others applauded the decision, overjoyed that a musical about mental illness had catapulted the difficult topic into the national spotlight. Revisiting Next to Normal for the second time in as many years, we’re more certain than ever that the Pulitzer went to the right people.

Alice Ripley and Curt Hansen in 'Next to Normal'.On paper, the show sounds like the worst idea for a musical since “Springtime for Hitler”. Next to Normal has no dance numbers to speak of, no chorus line of cute chorines, no happy ending. It is about a woman who has shock treatments. It is also about a family that has been devastated by tragedy, perhaps beyond repair. It is about doctors who admit that nobody really knows how to cure mental illness and that finding an effective treatment for mood disorders is like locating a silver thread in a huge, cloudy swamp. It is about the futility of stumbling blindly through ad lib regimes of SRO inhibitors, benzodiazepines, lithium, Prozac, Cymbalta, Zoloft, Seroquel, and an endless alphabet soup of other chemistry-altering pills whose side effects range from dizziness to death. Clearly, we’re not in Shuffle-off-to-Buffalo territory here.

Yet in a country where, year after year, suicides outnumber homicides, Next to Normal is about as relevant, compelling and urgently necessary as theater gets. It also benefits from composer Tom Kitt’s gorgeous score, Brian Yorkey’s smart, insightful lyrics and direction by Michael Greif that grabs your heart within the first 10 seconds and doesn’t let go until long after the final curtain call. Next to Normal is not an easy show: It confronts you relentlessly with the despair, absurdity and in-curability of mood disorders. But it is also gloriously hopeful as it shines a compassionate spotlight on a topic about which there is far too much ignorance.

And make no mistake – that ignorance is rampant. Consider the language of suicide: We say “Diana killed herself,” as if the act were a choice, a decision uninfluenced by the very real illness of depression. When people die of cancer, the disease is blamed. When people die of depression, the victims are blamed.

So much for background on the societal necessity of this particular show. This is theater, so the real question isn’t about its social value. It’s about whether it is any good. The answer is yes. With significant caveat. The cast for the touring production is mostly as good as the Broadway ensemble, but the player who falls outside that “mostly” is crucial.

     
Curt Hansen (Gabe), Alice Ripley (Diana) and Asa Somers (Dan) in Broadway in Chicago's 'Next to Normal' Emma Hunton as Natalie in the national tour of 'Next to Normal'.
Asa Somers as Dan in Broadway in Chicago's 'Next to Normal'. Preston Sadleir as Henry in Broadway in Chicago's "Next to Normal" Curt Hansen as Gabe in Broadway in Chicago's "Next to Normal"

Next to Normal is anchored by Alice Ripley, who won the Tony for her performance as Diana Goodman on Broadway. But Ripley’s voice is not what it was on Broadway a year ago. Performing this vocally demanding score eight times a week has taken a toll. She struggles significantly with both pitch and with diction. Crucial lyrics are muddy, soaring top notes falter painfully. Pivotal numbers – I Miss the Mountains, You Don’t Know, Didn’t I See This Movie – don’t get the clarity the plot needs or the musicality the score contains.

Acting, Ripley remains superb, capturing the highs, lows and utter absurdities of mood disorders with an accuracy that is both deeply moving and blackly hilarious. But Next to Normal demands a great vocalist as well as a great actress. Opening night at the Bank of America (Shubert) Theatre, Ripley simply wasn’t consistent in the former capacity.

Alice Ripley as Diana in Broadway in Chicago's "Next to Normal"Still – perhaps paradoxically – Next to Normal remains a four star, must-see show. The supporting cast is pitch perfect. As Diana’s struggling 16-year-old daughter, Emma Hunton is heart-breaking in her vulnerability and defensive anger. With the short, bittersweet “Everything Else”, she delivers an ode to the crystalline order of Mozart’s music, with a poignant wistfulness that’s as sad as it is beautiful. As Diana’s son Gabe, Curt Hansen is thrilling, at once alluring and menacing and positively electrifying on the rock-infused “I’m Alive.” As Diana’s husband, Asa Somers’ Dan, delivers both the all-but unbearable frustration that results when a loved one’s struggle with mental illness seems never ending and years of treatment prove to be of dubious value. And as Diana’s psychiatrist, Jeremy Kushnier deftly portrays both the expertise and the impotence of a science that is more guess work than anything.

Next to Normal remains a magnificent musical. But with Ripley no longer in prime voice, it isn’t as magnificent as it might be.

  
  
Rating: ★★★★
  
  

The cast of "Next to Normal", now playing at the Bank of America Theatre in downtown Chicago. Photo by Joan Marcus.

Photos by Joan Marcus.

     

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REVIEW: Long Day’s Journey Into Night (Polarity Ensemble)

  
   

This ‘Journey’ lacks propulsion

 

 

Long Days Journey - Polarity 002

   
Polarity Ensemble presents
    
Long Day’s Journey Into Night
    
Written by Eugene O’Neill
Directed by
Susan Padveen
at
Josephinum, 1500 N. Bell (map)
through Dec. 5  |  tickets: $10-$19  |  more info

Reviewed by Barry Eitel

Eugene O’Neill’s Long Day’s Journey into Night, one of the most important plays in the American canon, is a marathon experience. Four acts, four actors (mostly), and enough substance abuse to melt your liver. Clocking in at almost four hours, the bulky play is rarely done. Polarity Ensemble has bravely engaged with the monster, opening their season with the highly-biographical play. The spark driving this production is dim, causing the world to feel artificial. Considering the challenges, however, Polarity and director Susan Padveen should be commended.

Long Days Journey - Polarity 011Long Day’s Journey can be seen as O’Neill’s love letter to the theatre. Alternatively, it could also be seen as a suicide note.

The play is based on O’Neill’s family life, one that is accustomed to second-rate hotels and late night trains. The father of both the real-life O’Neill and Edmond, his doppelganger in his story, played the lead in a perpetually touring production of The Count of Monte Cristo for thousands of performances. In Long Day’s Journey, the stress of the road has shredded apart Edmond’s family, along with cheap doctors, alcoholism, and a mother with a nasty morphine addiction.

Somewhat surprisingly, the play reads like a living, breathing text rather than a starchy closet drama. O’Neill never saw the play staged. He finished it, threw it in a vault, and said it could only be published a quarter-century after his death. His wishes were subverted, though, and the play saw the light of the day only three years after he was buried. It was met with enormous acclaim, won Eugene a posthumous Pulitzer Prize, and now is required reading for any lover of American theatre. O’Neill’s memories are made watchable because of his charming wit and penchant for writing scorching conflicts which are constantly poked and resuscitated.

After sitting through that crushing diurnal cycle at Polarity’s space, you aren’t left snoring. But you aren’t left electrified, either. The cast shies away from the play’s essential weightiness. They never look comfortable just letting themselves sit immersed in the Tyrone’s dysfunction. The actors can’t get across the giant, swerving egos the script requires.

Long Days Journey - Polarity 013 Long Days Journey - Polarity 012
Long Days Journey - Polarity 003 Long Days Journey - Polarity 019

Kevin Kenneally is patriarch James. The role is perhaps the most difficult in the tale. He has probably the most stage time, and the hardest journey: watching the aftershocks of a family he had a major hand in destroying. Keanneally cannot plug into the raw power needed for James. For the most part, Keanneally steers his James well. But when the cards are down and pretenses have broken apart, he often retreats into vulnerability, as opposed to struggling to paint over his sensitivity with anger and disappointment.

Caroline Dodge Latta as James’ wife, Mary, fares better. She particularly shines in the last moments, where she brings down the house with one of my favorite monologues of all time. The two brothers are the most interesting piece of the cast. Bryan Breau’s Edmond and Eric Damon Smith’s whiskey-soaked Jamie spar with zest, even if some of the stakes aren’t high enough.

Long Day’s Journey into Night is a powerhouse play. Requiring thorough, battle-ready actors, the experience should be a punch in the throat. Padveen’s production is not a powerhouse. The lying isn’t believable enough, the delusions aren’t thick enough, and the family’s utter inability to communicate isn’t fully fleshed-out. The volatility needs to be wrenched up. O’Neill allows little room for tepidness.

That being said, Polarity could have done much, much, much worse. The major themes all bleed out, leaving plenty to ponder after the night finally arrives. Padveen’s production sucks the breath from you. But O’Neill’s incendiary script can knock you cold.

   
   
Rating: ★★½
       
     

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REVIEW: A Chorus Line (Marriott Theatre)

Gotta Dance!

 

Chorus Line at Marriott

   
Marriott Theatre presents
   
A Chorus Line
   
Music by Marvin Hamlisch, Lyrics by Edward Kleban
Book by James Kirkwood and Nicholas Dante
Directed by Mark Lococo
at Marriott Theatre, 10 Marriott Drive, Lincolnshire (map)
Through October 31  |  tickets: $35-$48  |  more info

reviewed by Lawrence Bommer

Mara Davi as Cassie - Chorus Line MarriottCelebrating its 35th anniversary in a terrific revival staged by Mark Lococo, A Chorus Line remains the late Michael Bennett‘s breakthrough backstage musical, winner of nine Tony Awards and the Pulitzer Prize. In this "show before a show" the parts–the 17 dancers–outweigh the whole. That greater good is an imaginary musical where, as the hoofers swagger in Nancy Missimi’s gold lamé suits against massive mirrors, their Broadway fantasies come true. But by then we know “what they did for” dance.”

Most musicals are examples of art imitating life. Not so A Chorus Line. It fascinates because its constantly young cast insure that this show is a textbook case of life imitating art imitating life. (Actors in 2010 who could be the children of the 1975 cast are creating the 1975 creation that was itself inspired by the reality of 1975 dancers.) The recessed mirrors in Marriott’s Production perfectly symbolize the backstage, show-before-a-show nature of this unconventional depiction of the creation of a very conventional Broadway musical. (Remember: The finale, “One Singular Sensation,” is really intended as a backup to a star of the Streisand, Verdon or Ann Miller persuasion. “Chorus Line” may be all about dance but the “outside” musical that they’re creating is not.)  

It’s ironic that, after we get to know the "dance gypsies" chosen from the 24 who endure this grueling try-out, the survivors get swallowed up in "One," this massive finale where what counts is the lockstep anonymity of a kick line. The humanity that went into the song-confessionals, where the auditioners testified to the resilience, sexiness, escapism and transience of their trade, yields to the conformity of interchangeable parts. This "one singular sensation" is American individuality feeding American efficiency. Another all-too-American quality, at least at this stage of the recession, is the desperation that surges through “I Need This Job.”

 

Anika Ellis as Shiela - Chorus Line Marriott Bryan Knowlton as Paul - Chorus Line Marriott
Chorus Line - One Singular Sensation Nina Fluke as Val - Chorus Line Marriott
Chorus Line Cast - Marriott

Before that chorus/assembly line closes ranks, we’ve felt the full diversity of the dancers, as preserved from interviews that Bennett did with the original dancers some 35 years ago. It’s ironic that the current dancers may have their own stories but they’re in effect prisoners of the musical’s now-distant past.

In Lococo’s devoted reprise of this not-so-retro musical, a second (or third?) generation solidly replay the life stories of the 1975 originals, slinking and strutting their way through Bennett’s pizzazz-packed choreography (here re-imagined by Rachel Rockwell) and tearing into Marvin Hamlisch‘s sturdy score. This arena staging may be in the round but the mirrors work even better than in a proscenium  production. They may not suggest many more dancers than the cast itself but the recessed effect makes it look like we’re seeing memories as much as moments here.

Adam Estes as Gregory - Chorus Line MarriottFleshing out showbiz stereotypes with true-life immediacy, Alexander Aguilar relishes the effortless bravura of "I Can Do That" and Pilar Millhollen belts out the tough-girl wisdom of "What I Did for Love." As Sheila, the aging but indomitable siren, Anika Ellis purges her past in "At the Ballet," while Nina Fluke reinvents Val’s surgical saga in "Dance: Ten; Looks: Three."

In the one unsung solo, Bryan Knowlton digs heartache from Paul’s tale of a gay dancer unexpectedly accepted by his family. Registering the full joy of moving fast, buffed-up Max Kumangai is a blurry revelation.

As he shapes the audition-rehearsal with God-like omniscience, Chicago favorite Tim Gregory brings easy authority to confessor-choreographer Zach, though his soap-opera showdown with Cassie, his old flame, seems perfunctory. Undeterred, Broadway notable Mara Davi (who appeared in the recent revival) throws herself into "The Music and the Mirror," Cassie’s tour-de-force dance sequence. It should feel as if everyone who ever danced the part were with her but on opening night she seemed to lose her terpsichorean motivations and it fell flat.

First and always, the revival confirms the continuing cause for its docu-tribute: Bennett’s high-strutting, soul-stirring dances are a perfect match for the aspirations this musical will always extol.

   
   
Rating: ★★★★
   
   

Chorus Line - One Singular Sensation2

 

   
   

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Jeff Award nominations – Court and Timeline lead the pack

Court and TimeLine Clean Up

The Jeff Awards has announced 162 nominations in 31 categories for Chicago Equity theatrical productions which opened between August 1, 2009, and July 31, 2010. The 42nd Annual Jeff Awards ceremony honoring excellence in professional theatre produced within the immediate Chicago area will be held on Monday, October 25, at Drury Lane Oakbrook. Musical numbers featuring cast members from nominated musicals and video segments from nominated plays will be included in the Jeff Awards ceremony, emceed by luminary actors Deanna Dunagan and Felicia P. Fields. The evening is black tie optional and the public is cordially invited to attend. Full list of nominees is after the jump.

 

 Production – Play – Large

The Brother/Sister Plays – Steppenwolf Theatre   (our review ★★★★)
The Elaborate Entrance of Chad Deity – Victory Gardens Theater i/a/w Teatro VistaTheatre With a View  (our review ★★★½)
The Illusion – Court Theatre   (our review ★★★)
Ma Rainey’s Black Bottom – Court Theatre  (our review ★★★★)
The Mystery of Irma Vep – Court Theatre  (our review ★★★★
A Streetcar Named Desire – Writers’ Theatre   (our review ★★★★)

Production – Play – Midsize

Abigail’s Party – A Red Orchid Theatre   (our review ★★★½)
All My Sons – TimeLine Theatre Company    (our review ★★★★
The Farnsworth Invention – TimeLine Theatre  (our review ★★★½)
‘Master Harold’…And The Boys – TimeLine Theatre (our review ★★★½)
Tobacco Road – American Blues Theater   (our review ★★★)

Production – Musical – Large

Animal Crackers – Goodman Theatre   (our review  ★★★)
Cabaret – Drury Lane Productions  (our review ★★½)
The Drowsy Chaperone – Marriott Theatre  (our review ★★★½)
Hairspray – Marriott Theatre  (our review ★★★★)
Ragtime – Drury Lane Productions  (our review ★★★★)
Thoroughly Modern Millie – Drury Lane Productions  (our review ★★★)

Productions – Revue

The Absolute Best Friggin’ Time of Your Life – Second City etc (our review ★★★½)   
Low Down Dirty Blues – Northlight Theatre  (our review ★★★½)
Oh Coward! – Writers’ Theatre   (our review ★★★½)

Ensemble

Abigail’s Party – A Red Orchid Theatre
Animal Crackers – Goodman Theatre
The Brother/Sister Plays – Steppenwolf Theatre Company
The Farnsworth Invention – TimeLine Theatre Company
Ma Rainey’s Black Bottom – Court Theatre
Ragtime – Drury Lane Productions
The Wedding – TUTA Theatre Chicago

New Work – Play

Kristoffer DiazThe Elaborate Entrance of Chad Deity – Victory Gardens Theater i/a/w Teatro Vista…Theatre With a View
Michael Golamco Year Zero – Victory Gardens Theater
Andrew Hinderaker Suicide, Incorporated – The Gift Theatre
Jim Lynch The Tallest Man – The Artistic Home
Bruce Norris A Parallelogram – Steppenwolf Theatre Company
David Schwimmer and Andy Bellin Trust – Lookingglass Theatre Company
Craig WrightMistakes Were Made – A Red Orchid Theatre

Director – Play

Nick Bowling The Farnsworth Invention – TimeLine Theatre Company
David Cromer A Streetcar Named Desire – Writers’ Theatre
Sean Graney The Mystery of Irma Vep – Court Theatre
Tina Landau The Brother/Sister Plays – Steppenwolf Theatre Company
Shade MurrayAbigail’s Party – A Red Orchid Theatre
Charles Newell The Illusion – Court Theatre
Kimberly Senior All My Sons – TimeLine Theatre Company
Edward Torres The Elaborate Entrance of Chad Deity – Victory Gardens Theater i/a/w Teatro Vista…Theatre With a View

Director – Musical or Review

Jim CortiCabaret – Drury Lane Productions
Jim Corti Oh Coward! – Writers’ Theatre
William Osetek Thoroughly Modern Millie – Drury Lane Productions
Marc Robin The Drowsy Chaperone – Marriott Theatre
Marc Robin Hairspray – Marriott Theatre
Rachel Rockwell Ragtime – Drury Lane Productions
Henry Wishcamper Animal Crackers – Goodman Theatre

Actor in a Principal Role – Play

Desmin Borges The Elaborate Entrance of Chad Deity – Victory Gardens Theater i/a/w Teatro Vista…Theatre With a View
Brian Dennehy Hughie/Krapp’s Last Tape – Goodman Theatre
Rob Fagin The Farnsworth Invention – TimeLine Theatre Company
Erik Hellman The Mystery of Irma Vep – Court Theatre
Tracy Letts American Buffalo – Steppenwolf Theatre Company
Nick Sandys Les Liaisons Dangereuses – Remy Bumppo Theatre Company
Michael Shannon Mistakes Were Made – A Red Orchid Theatre
Chris Sullivan The Mystery of Irma Vep – Court Theatre

Actor in a Principal Role – Musical

Quentin Earl Darrington Ragtime – Drury Lane Productions
James Harms The Drowsy Chaperone – Marriott Theatre
Max Quinlan Jesus Christ Superstar – Theatre at the Center
Alan Schmuckler Sugar – Drury Lane Productions
Joey Slotnick Animal Crackers – Goodman Theatre

Actress in a Principal Role – Play

Tracy Michelle ArnoldPrivate Lives – Chicago Shakespeare Theater
Cassandra Bissell Mary’s Wedding – Rivendell Theatre Ensemble
Janet Ulrich Brooks All My Sons – TimeLine Theatre Company
Kirsten Fitzgerald Abigail’s Party – A Red Orchid Theatre
Natasha Lowe A Streetcar Named Desire – Writers’ Theatre
Lia MortensenThe Hiding Place – Provision Theater
Allison Torem Trust – Lookingglass Theatre Company

Actress in a Principal Role – Musical

Holly Ann Butler Thoroughly Modern Millie – Drury Lane Productions
Cory Goodrich Ragtime – Drury Lane Productions
Heidi Kettenring I Do! I Do! – Theatre at the Center
Marissa Perry Hairspray – Marriott Theatre

Solo Performance

Mary Beth Fisher The Year of Magical Thinking – Court Theatre
Dael Orlandersmith Stoop Stories – Goodman Theatre

Actor in a Supporting Role – Play

Allen GilmoreSizwe Banzi is Dead – Court Theatre
Francis Guinan A Guide for the Perplexed – Victory Gardens Theater
Tom IrwinA Parallelogram – Steppenwolf Theatre Company
Timothy Edward Kane The Illusion – Court Theatre
Nick SandysTwelfth Night – First Folio Theatre
Lindsay Smiling Blue Door – Victory Gardens Theater
Michael Patrick Thornton Suicide, Incorporated – The Gift Theatre

Actor in a Supporting Role – Musical

Mark David Kaplan Ragtime – Drury Lane Productions
Peter Kevoian The Christmas Schooner – Theatre at the Center
David Lively Cabaret – Drury Lane Productions
Adam Pelty The Drowsy Chaperone – Marriott Theatre

Actress in a Supporting Role – Play

Janet Ulrich Brooks When She Danced – TimeLine Theatre Company
Cindy Gold Awake and Sing! – Northlight Theatre
Rebecca Spence Les Liaisons Dangereuses – Remy Bumppo Theatre Company
Stacy Stoltz A Streetcar Named Desire – Writers’ Theatre
Wandachristine The Old Settler – Writers’ Theatre
Natalie West Abigail’s Party – A Red Orchid Theatre
Jacqueline Williams The Brother/Sister Plays – Steppenwolf Theatre Company

Actress in a Supporting Role – Musical

Rebecca Finnegan Cabaret – Drury Lane Productions
Heidi Kettenring Hairspray – Marriott Theatre
Valisia LeKae Ragtime – Drury Lane Productions
Barbara Robertson Yeast Nation (the triumph of life) – American Theater Company
Paula Scrofano Thoroughly Modern Millie – Drury Lane Productions

Actor in a Revue

Mississippi Charles Bevel Low Down Dirty Blues – Northlight Theatre
Rob Lindley Oh Coward! – Writers’ Theatre
Gregory Porter Low Down Dirty Blues – Northlight Theatre
Sam Richardson Spoiler Alert: Everybody Dies – The Second City

Actress in a Revue

Christina Anthony The Absolute Best Friggin’ Time of Your Life – The Second City e.t.c.
Felicia P. Fields Low Down Dirty Blues – Northlight Theatre
Kate Fry – Oh Coward! – Writers’ Theatre
Sandra Reaves-Phillips – Low Down Dirty Blues – Northlight Theatre

Scenic Design – Large

Jeffrey Bauer A Guide for the Perplexed – Victory Gardens Theater
John Culbert Ma Rainey’s Black Bottom – Court Theatre
Kevin Depinet Ragtime – Drury Lane Productions
Kevin Depinet Thoroughly Modern Millie – Drury Lane Productions
Collette Pollard The Illusion – Court Theatre
Todd Rosenthal A Parallelogram – Steppenwolf Theatre Company
Walt Spangler A True History of the Johnstown Flood – Goodman Theatre

Scenic Design – Midsize 

Aimee Hanyzewski Of Mice and Men – Oak Park Festival Theatre
James Leaming Tobacco Road – American Blues Theater
Timothy Mann ‘Master Harold’…And The Boys – TimeLine Theatre Company
Angela Miller Jeeves in Bloom – First Folio Theatre
Inseung Park The Hiding Place – Provision Theatre

Costume Design – Large

Jacqueline Firkins The Illusion– Court Theatre
Nancy Missimi The Drowsy Chaperone – Marriott Theatre
Tatjana Radisic Cabaret – Drury Lane Productions
Alison Siple The Mystery of Irma Vep – Court Theatre

Costume Design – Midsize

William J.  Morey Into the Woods – Porchlight Music Theatre Chicago
Sarah E. Ross & Kristin DeiTos Tobacco Road – American Blues Theater
Emily Waecker Les Liaisons Dangereuses – Remy Bumppo Theatre Company

Sound Design – Large

Mikhail Fiksel The Elaborate Entrance of Chad Deity – Victory Gardens Theater i/a/w Teatro Vista…Theatre With a View
Joshua Horvath and Nick Keenan The Illusion Court Theatre
Joshua Horvath and Ray Nardelli Ma Rainey’s Black Bottom– Court Theatre
Ray Nardelli Hephaestus: A Greek Mythology Circus Tale – Lookingglass Theatre Company and Silverguy Entertainment

Sound Design – Midsize

Victoria Delorio Mary’s Wedding – Rivendell Theatre Ensemble
Mikhail Fiksel – War With The NewtsNext Theatre Company
Nick Keenan End Days – Next Theatre Company
Miles Polaski One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest The Gift Theatre

Lighting Design – Large

Brian Sidney Bembridge Hephaestus: A Greek Mythology Circus Tale – Lookingglass Theatre Company and Silverguy Entertainment
John Culbert The Illusion– Court Theatre
Jesse Klug Cabaret – Drury Lane Productions
Jesse Klug Ragtime – Drury Lane Productions
Jesse Klug Thoroughly Modern Millie – Drury Lane Productions

Lighting Design – Midsize

Lee Fiskness End Days – Next Theatre Company
Jesse Klug Yeast Nation (the triumph of life) – American Theater Company
Keith Parham The Farnsworth Invention – TimeLine Theatre Company
Jaymi Lee Smith Mary’s Wedding – Rivendell Theatre Ensemble

Choreography

John Carrafa Animal Crackers – Goodman Theatre
Tammy Mader Thoroughly Modern Millie – Drury Lane Productions
Marc Robin The Drowsy Chaperone Marriott Theatre
Marc Robin Hairspray – Marriott Theatre

Original Incidental Music

Alaric Jans The Hiding Place – Provision Theater
Lindsay Jones Richard III – Chicago Shakespeare Theater
Henry Marsh Twelfth Night – First Folio Theatre
Ray Nardelli and Joshua Horvath The Long Red Road – Goodman Theatre
Ray Nardelli, Andre Pluess and Josh Horvath Hephaestus: A Greek Mythology Lookingglass Theatre Company and Silverguy Entertainment – Circus Tale
Jesse TerrillThe Wedding – TUTA Theatre Chicago

Music Direction

Roberta Duchak Ragtime – Drury Lane Productions
Doug Peck Animal Crackers – Goodman Theatre
Doug Peck Cabaret – Drury Lane Productions
Doug Peck Oh Coward! – Writers’ Theatre
Robert Reddrick Nothing But the Blues – Black Ensemble Theater

Artistic Specialization

Bridges Media – Multimedia Design – Trust – Lookingglass Theatre Company
Sage Marie Carter – Projections Design – Ragtime – Drury Lane Productions
Sylvia Hernandez-DiStasi – Circus Choreography and Movement Direction – Icarus – Lookingglass Theatre Company
Nick Sandys – Fight Choreography – Les Liaisons Dangereuses – Remy Bumppo Theatre Company
David Woolley – Fight Choreography – The Elaborate Entrance of Chad Deity – Victory Gardens Theater i/a/w Teatro Vista…Theatre With a View

 

For more info about the Jeff Awards,

please visit www.jeffawards.org .

Chicago Fringe Festival announces Pilsen play line-up

chicago_skyline_and_lake_michigan 

CHICAGO FRINGE FESTIVAL 2010

Pilsen Lineup and Venues, September 1st – 5th

 

The Chicago Fringe Festival has announced the complete lineup for its inaugural performing arts festival, slated for September 1st through the 5th in the Pilsen neighborhood. In the spirit of fringe festivals worldwide, 46 productions were selected by lottery from a total of 156 applicants. The final schedule will be released on August 1, 2010.

13 states will be represented at the uncensored festival, including New York, California, Maryland, Massachusetts, Colorado and Nevada. In addition, 2 international productions will make an appearance at the festival, with works from Israel and Canada making their Chicago debut. All told, 198 performers will participate in this landmark event.

Local Chicago artists will have a strong showing at the festival, with many acts looking forward to performing for a hometown crowd. New Millennium Theatre Company will present a revival of The Texas Chainsaw Musical, directed by Artistic Director Chad Wise. Genesis Ensemble, a two-year-old performance collective, will present sweet, half-darkness.

"Pilsen’s vitality and connection to the arts made it a natural fit for the festival," says Executive Director and Founder, Sarah Mikayla Brown. "We’re excited to push both artistic and geographical boundaries as we introduce our audience to new works in what may be a new neighborhood to them."

Fringe Central

At the heart of the festivities will be Fringe Central, located near Racine and 18th Street. Live music, entertainment and outdoor exhibits will be accompanied by delicious food provided by local favorite Honky Tonk BBQ. "Fringe Central will be ground zero for participants and audience alike to kick back, relax, and enjoy thesights and sounds of Pilsen. We’re excited to provide a place where folks can share ideas, network and just enjoy good company," says Associate Producer Vinnie Lacey.

Fringe Central will also play host to the Chicago Fringe Preview Party on August 28, 2010. Attendees will get an early taste of festival offerings as selected performers preview their Chicago Fringe productions.

8 Venues

All eight venues have been announced, including the Chicago Art Department Gallery, Dream Theatre, Temple Gallery, EP Theater, Chicago Arts District Galleries, Casa Aztlan and Simone’s Bar. Six of the venues are non-traditional spaces, and the Festival is currently raising capital to ensure premium flooring, lighting, sound equipment and technicians are in place to transform each space into a premiere performance venue.

MidwestFringe Circuit

The Chicago Fringe Festival will also mark the last stop of the first annual MidwestFringe Circuit, featuring three other American fringe festivals: Kansas City, Minnesota and Indianapolis. Four productions from each festival were selected by lottery to tour all four cities.


Guarenteed production slots at the 2010 Chicago Fringe Festival:

 

LOCAL

  • Shanna Shrum – Skinny Dipping – Not Your Mama’s One Woman Show!
  • Timothy Mooney Repertory Theatre – Moliere Than Thou
  • Lincoln Square TheatreThe Parenticide Club
  • Shakura World Theatre – Columbine & Roses
  • Piel Morena Contemporary Dance – Machito Pichon
  • Rebecca Kling – Uncovering the Mirrors
  • 2nd Story TheatreCabinalysis… or, Build Your Own Damn Cabin!
  • Citadel Theatre Company5 Times 10 – A Collection of 10 Minutes Plays
  • Les Enfants Terribles – Believe in Nothing, Mock Everything
  • The Consortium Project – Knee-Jerk
  • Megan Rhyme – Inner Cartography
  • Ripettes Burlesque – The Ripettes Burlesque in… Peter Panties: A Neverland Burlesque
  • Hubris ProductionsAnnee Pocalypse
  • The Anatomy Collective – TBD – Untitled Anatomy Collective Project
  • New Millenium Theatre  – The Texas Chainsaw Musical
  • No Small Productions – What To Expect
  • Weber & Einstein – Please Love Me, High School Boyfriend
  • Jason Economus – The Steve Show
  • Genesis Ensemblesweet, half-darkness
  • Terra Mysterium – Finding Eleusis
  • Patchwork Woman Performance – Bridges
  • The Hollow Tree – Scenes of a Love Like Nature
  • The Talking Cure – The Talking Cure Presents

NON-LOCAL

  • Theater Undeclared – Grind: The Musical
  • Swanderwoman Productions – Driving the Body Back
  • No Snowcones Productions – That Greek Thing
  • Jeff Kreisler & Up Top Productions – Get Rich Cheating
  • Meddlin’ Productions – Girls and Dolls
  • Adam Theater – Hansel & Gretel the end of a fairy tale
  • Terri Cyrmes – Single Girl in a Gay Man’s World
  • Pantea Productions – Silken Veils
  • Nicole Kearney Productions – And Ya Don’t Stop a hip hop play
  • Les Kurkendaal – Christmas in Bakersfield
  • RE/Dance – The Lonely Visitors
  • Paul Diem – Mulatto Child – Voices From the Margins
  • Evan O’Sullivan – Evan O’Television Presents: Double Negatives
  • BITE Theatre – KRAIGSLIST
  • La Rinascita – The Fugitives
  • Howard Petrick – Rambo: The Missing Years
  • Gemma Wilcox – The Honeymoon Period is Officially Over
  • Opium, Fireworks and Lead – Exhausted Paint: The Death of Van Gogh
  • Patrick Devine – Breaking Down in America
  • Maire Clerkin The Bad Arm – Confessions of a Dodgy Irish Dancer
  • And Giggles Productions – The Playdaters
  • Tiberius Productions Touch My App
  • What’s a Girl to Do Productions – Drunk with Hope in Chicago

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Theater Thursday: Talk Radio (State Theatre at Heartland)

Theater Thursday

 

Thursday, July 29

Talk Radio   by Eric Bogosian

The State Theatre of Chicago at Heartland Studio, 7016 N. Glenwood Ave

talkradioVisit the Heartland Studio for a radical re-imagining of Eric Bogosian‘s Pulitzer-Prize nominated play, Talk Radio. Then stick around immediately following the performance for a discussion with the director, cast, and Artistic Director. Light refreshments and drinks will be provided. Talk radio host Barry Champlain is a relic of an analog age, on the verge of a deal for national syndication. Tonight, not only is he under assault from many callers-in, but he also has digital communication thrust upon him. Bogosian meets Orwell in this commentary on the media.

Show begins at 8 p.m.   Event begins immediately following the performance

Tickets: $20    For reservations visit www.statetheatrechicago.com.