Emerald City Theatre announces 2010-11 season

Emerald City 15th Anniversary Logo

Emerald City marks 15th Anniversary

with exciting new season

 

Charlie and the Chocolate Factory Charlie and the Chocolate Factory Charlie and the Chocolate Factory Charlie and the Chocolate Factory

 

Emerald City Theatre Artistic and Executive Director Karen Cardarelli has announced the company’s 2010-2011 season lineup of family theater, which marks the organization’s 15th anniversary season and includes two beloved classic productions and two Chicago premieres.

The season commences with the Midwest premiere of Pinkalicious, direct from a sold out run Off Broadway

Emerald City celebrates the holiday season with a new take on an old favorite-a rocked out version of L. Frank Baum’s The Wizard of Oz.

2011 begins with a bang as Emerald City Theatre presents the world premiere of Don’t Let the Pigeon Drive the Bus!, based on the Caldecott Award-winning books by Mo Willems. This brand new adaptation by Associate Artistic Director Ernie Nolan marks the company’s 28th world premiere production and continues the work of The PlayGround, formed in 2008 and dedicated to the development of world-class scripts for early learners.  Since its inception, Emerald City original scripts have been produced at 17 theatre companies nationwide. Most recently, Co-Founder and Artistic Associate Alyn Cardarelli‘s hit How I Became a Pirate was produced at Imagination Stage in Washington D.C, Dallas Children’s Theatre, and Stages Theatre in Minneapolis.

The 2011 Season ends on a delicious note with Roald Dahl’s beloved Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, directed by Ernie Nolan. 


 

September 18 – December 31, 2010

Charlie and the Chocolate Factory

Pinkalicious

Book: Elizabeth Kann & Victoria Kann
Music/Lyrics: John Gregor
Lyrics: Elizabeth Kann & Victoria Kann

Based on the book "Pinkalicious" by Victoria & Elizabeth Kann
Directed by Ernie Nolan

The season commences with the Midwest premiere of Pinkalicious, direct from a sold out run Off Broadway.

When Pinkalicious Pinkerton eats one too many pink cupcakes, she catches a serious case of Pinkititis and turns pink from head to toe!  To cure her condition, Pinkalicious’ organic-eating parents and broccoli-loving little brother must teach her the importance of a balanced diet. A Midwest premier, directed by Associate Artistic Director Ernie Nolan, this heartwarming musical’s Gateway Theme of healthy eating is sure to strike a chord among parents and picky eaters alike. Families are invited to hear the original story, make pink crafts and enjoy pink treats at Pinkalicious’ Cupcake Tea Parties, special events beginning in late September.     Recommended for ages 3+.


November 18, 2010 – January 2, 2011

Charlie and the Chocolate FactoryThe Wizard of Oz

 

By L. Frank Baum
Music/Lyrics by Harold Arlen and E.Y. Harburg
Adapted for the Royal Shakespeare Company by by John Kane
Directed/Choreographed by Ernie Nolan.

When Dorothy Gale and her beloved dog Toto are swept away to a land somewhere over the rainbow, they discover the true meaning of home. In this rocked out version of the classic story, you’ll hear favorites like "If I Only Had a Brain" and "Follow the Yellow Brick Road." Bring your munchkins to Oz this holiday season for one of the most memorable stories ever created Recommended for ages 3+

 


 

January 15, 2011 – April 10, 2011

 

Charlie and the Chocolate Factory
Don’t Let the Pigeon Drive the Bus!

World Premiere!

From the Books by Mo Willems
Adapted by Ernie Nolan
Directed by Jacqueline Stone

Based on Mo Willems’ Caldecott-winning favorite, this highly interactive play puts the audience in the driver’s seat as everybody’s favorite pigeon asks to drive the bus, eat a hot dog, have a puppy, and stay up late.  It’s up to you to decide what he can do.  You’ve never met a pigeon like this before!  Recommended for ages 3+

 

 


 

February 12, 2011 – May 8, 2011

 

Charlie and the Chocolate Factory

Charlie and the Chocolate Factory

By Richard R. George
From the fantasy by Roald Dahl
Directed by Ernie Nolan

Mysterious Willy Wonka is opening the gates to his coveted and curious chocolate factory- and only five children will be let inside! When good-hearted dreamer Charlie Bucket unwraps his lucky golden ticket, he and his grandfather are whisked away into a world of pure imagination. A tasty treat for the entire family!  Recommended for ages 3+

 

 

 


About the PlayGround

The PlayGround is Emerald City’s formal new works process, created in 2008 and lead by Associate Artistic Director Ernie Nolan. The PlayGround manages the selection of concepts for adaptation, organizes the internal creative input and produces table and staged readings. Additionally, it researches the needs of young audiences and how those needs can be supported through theater.

"Emerald City Theatre has become one of Chicago’s largest Gateways to the Arts for young children," says Associate Artistic Director Ernie Nolan. "Understanding the difference between how a 4-year old learns from a play and how a 10-year old learns takes a lot of time and research. The PlayGround frames the work we have been doing to combine the understanding of our audience with the work our artists are creating."

       
         

Emerald City 15th Anniversary Logo

         
         

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REVIEW: Shoot Faster, Dear Brother, I’m Dying (Apollo)

Lovely lies, perfectly preserved

 

A Civil War era America gets amusingly preserved in 'Shoot Faster, Dear Brother, I'm Dying!'

Apollo Theatre presents
  
Shoot Faster, Dear Brother, I’m Dying!
 
Written by Joe Anderson and Demian Krentz
Directed by
Amanda Blake Davis
at
Apollo Theatre Studio, 2540 N. Lincoln (map)
through July 31st  |  tickets: $15  |  more info

reviewed by Lawrence Bommer

Not your usual blast from the past, this delicious, daffy and demented spoof of an imaginary Victorian-era correspondence between two strategically separated brothers amounts to a kind of sit-down comedy. It’s two hours of perfect parody as Shoot Faster, Dear Brother, I’m Dying! exactly apes the ornate letter-writing style of a A Civil War era America gets amusingly preserved in 'Shoot Faster, Dear Brother, I'm Dying!'century and a half ago. And it works equally well as a delightful exercise in deadpan absurdity. Silly and funny are far from mutually exclusive: The proof is this archly phony recitation of manufactured adventures.

Over the last decade comedians Joe Anderson and Demian Krentz have merrily concocted a series of letters exchanged between the hypothetical Binjimmons brothers, Chauncy and Adam, pontificating blowhards and gasbags with style to  spare. It’s here debuted as a major historical reclamation, here performed–as a breathless curator (Karen S. Chapman) describes–for the first time in chronological order from 1864 to 1871. Adding to the artificial authenticity is a musical backdrop by fiddler Kevin Madderson and a series of cleverly appropriated 19th century photographs and drawings depicting the brothers in love and war.

In the course of correspondence the brothers emerge as a kind of 19th century Beavis and Butthead. Without quite realizing the awful secrets they reveal, the letters recount Chauncy’s cowardice as a Confederate soldier, his desperate trek to the still wild West where he weds a whore who he thought was a nurse because “the hospital shared the same wall as a bordello,” and has his incredibly faithful dog stolen by a band of fur traders. Chauncy goes on to destroy scores of trees in order to create a Barnum-like entertainment complex. He slaughters buffalos to satisfy his need for sandwiches. He remains recklessly clueless of the carnage he commits wherever he wanders.

Meanwhile, ensconced in their family home in Virginia, brother Adam manages to sire a big-headed baby who’s captured by Indians, loses track of his randy father (a closet Mormon) and his deranged mother, who manages to terrorize a town before disappearing into the wilderness. When Chauncy is kidnapped by a crew of fur-loving partisans who despise him for leveling their forest, he’s rescued by his brother and a posse of courageous courtesans. It’s so crazy you almost think it just might be true…

 

Demian Krentz as Adam Binjimmons in Shoot Faster, Dear Brother, I'm Dying Joe Anderson as Chauncy Binjimmons in Shoot Faster, Dear Brother, I'm Dying

Complicating matters is the fact that five years of letters appear to be missing, only to be found just in time to fill in assorted gaps during the second act.

The remarkable feat–worthy of Mark Twain and other tall-tale tellers–is how well the author-performers capture the baroquely ornamental flavor of the era. With breathless zeal and unflappable seriousness, they deliver their hilariously flowery prose, festooned with overwrought aphorisms mingling with anecdotes of casual cruelty. Chauncy, a pathological liar when he’s not a self-pitying hypocrite, can mention the approach of a little boy, only to correct himself a moment later by saying it was actually a large man who was further off. The Binjimmons will never use four words when ten will do even better. The result is an embarrassment of riches which occasionally is just an embarrassment.

A closer recreation of 19th century humorists can’t be imagined nor should it. Or as the theater charmingly puts it, “Chicago theatergoers who have long clamored for an epistolary comedy about the Civil War, featuring a live fiddle players and photos of old things, will finally be able to check their item off their collective bucket lists.” Indeed.

  
  
Rating: ★★★½
  
  

 

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REVIEW: Million Dollar Quartet – yeah, it still rocks!

Yeah, it still rocks

 

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Apollo Theater Chicago presents
   
Million Dollar Quartet
   
Book by Colin Escott and Floyd Mutrux
Musical Arrangements by
Chuck Mead
Directed by
Floyd Mutrux & Eric Schaeffer
at
Apollo Theater, 2540 N. Lincoln (map)
through September 5th  |  tickets: $59-$80  |  more info

reviewed by Oliver Sava

I know two people that have seen Million Dollar Quartet over 30 times. A retired married couple, they are the target audience of the musical: seniors with a nostalgic appreciation for the pioneers of rock n’ roll. I have a nostalgic appreciation for No Doubt. My knowledge of Johnny Cash’s music is the “Walk the Line” soundtrack, my Elvis I.Q. is limited to my mother’s cassettes on road trips, and I recognize the songs mdq-03 of Carl Perkins and Jerry Lee Lewis, but know next to nothing about the men themselves. That being said, Million Dollar Quartet is currently playing on Broadway with a national tour in the works and Tony nominations in its pocket, so it’s got to be good, right?

It is.

I expected dynamic musical numbers from skilled performers, but Million Dollar Quartet is more than just a glorified cover band. Escott and Mutrux’s book is edutainment at its finest, a spirited history lesson on the early days of rock n’ roll centered on legendary music producer Sam Phillips (Tim Decker), the man responsible for the superstar jam session. Decker understands the emotional journey of his character, from Phillips’ pride in the humble Sun Records, his anger at losing his major talent, and his hope in the future of rock n’ roll. Phillips’ devotion to the music is clear in Decker’s confidence on stage, portraying a man whose home is the studio.

Flashbacks to Phillips’ first encounters with Perkins (Gabe Bowling), Cash (Sean Sullivan), and Presley (David Lago) establish the relationship between the musicians and their producer, and reveal how paramount Phillips was to the evolution of these men as artists. These three men are the already established Sun Records family, three brothers that don’t always get along but respect each other, with Lewis (Lance Lipinsky) as the cocky new kid with the potential to be a star. When the four of them play together, the results are electric, and Phillips is that tie that binds them.

The thrill of Million Dollar Quartet is seeing four legends playing together for the first and only time. The actors have to sell the illusion for maximum impact, and the new cast does so admirably. Lipinsky has big shoes to fill – Levi Kreis is nominated for a Tony and has won the Outer Critics Circle for Best Featured Actor – but he backs up Lewis’s ego with boundless energy and fevered fingers that showcase his technical mastery. Lipinsky’s mischievous smile and carefree demeanor contrast with his more professional comrades, providing comic relief and adding tension to the script, particularly in his interactions with Bowling’s hotheaded Perkins. With his hit song “Blue Suede Shoes” usurped by Presley and his record sales dwindling, Perkins stands to lose the most, and Bowling finds the desperation that lies beneath the temper.

mdq01Sullivan has Cash’s bass vocals down pat, and his gentle conduct serves to make the character’s conflict – telling Phillips he will not be renewing his Sun contract – all the more believable. As the most imitated of the group, Lago does all the hip shaking and lip curling you expect, but is careful not to become a caricature. At this point in his career Elvis is still a young upstart, and Lago plays him with an understated sexuality that suggests a man not yet in control of the power he has over people, especially women. Kelly Lamont brings some estrogen to the studio as Dyanne, Presley’s sassy girlfriend with a powerhouse belt, and her rendition of “Fever” smolders, starting softly and building in intensity until the last note. Watching the quartet take turns flirting with her is consistently amusing, and the a cappella fan in me swooned as she vocalized the fiddle part in “Riders in the Sky.”

When the quartet plays, they forget about contracts and television appearances and just live in the music. That release is rock n’ roll, and Million Dollar Quartet is a fitting tribute to its early years that shouldn’t be missed.

   
   
Rating: ★★★½
   
   

 

   
  

REVIEW: Peter Pan (Emerald City Theatre)

Tinkerbell’s pixie-dust works its magic on rollicking production

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Emerald City Theatre presents:

Peter Pan

Based on the character created by J.M. Barrie
Book and lyrics by Alyn Cardarelli
Music by Steve Goers
Directed by Matthew Gunnels
Thru July 22nd at
Apollo Theatre, 2540 N. Lincoln (more info)

reviewed by Katy Walsh

Disney, Depp, Dustin, Duncan, the legend of Peter Pan has been retold and reimagined on stage and screen for over a century. This time its Emerald City Theatre’s adaptation as they present the world premiere of Peter Pan. Based on the character created by J.M. Barrie, Emerald City has created an energetic and colorful musical of the infamous boy who didn’t want to grow up. This version focuses on Wendy’s rite of passage. Mr. and Mrs. Darling want Wendy to move out of her childhood nursery and put on a big girl’s dress. Wendy wants to play! Cue the Pan. Peter arrives to whisk her away. He takes her to Neverland, a magical island where lost boys, pirates, Indians and a crocodile duel it out daily in the ultimate never ending game. Emerald City’s Peter Pan is a fun family pleaser with comedy and sentimentality that reaches the child in all of us.

In my Peter Pan encounters, I’ve never rooted for the pirates. Until now! Aside from trying to stab and poison people, Captain Hook (Michael Kingston) and Smee (Zev Steinberg ) are likable guys. Steve Goer‘s “Pirates with a Plan” song is a standout number with Kingston and Steinberg’s comedic antics. In particular, Steinberg is acrobatic in his movement throughout the play. His fight with Jamila Turner (Tiger Lilly) has a thrilling physicality. And Turner shifts gears perfectly in her dual roles as a strong, independent princess warrior and the empathetic maternal Mrs. Darling. Michael Rieman (Tootles) and Caleb Probst (Slightly) are hilarious as the lost boys and later in drag as the mermaids. Allison Lind (Wendy) is wonderful playing a girl playing a mother in a pretend world. With a permanent angelic smile, Ryotaro Shigeta (Peter) exudes a youthful arrogance and sense of fun. He is definitely “The Pan.”

Sprinkling the pixie dust on his talented ensemble, Matthew Gunnels directs a briskly paced sixty minute adventure. The choreography (Ernie Nolan ) is bursts of activity in the lively chases and fighting. The costumes (Branimira Ivanova ) are childlike fun. Peter and the lost boys wear lively patchwork outfits that fit a child’s imaginative style; the mermaids are in vibrant wigs and tails swimming on rollers. This Peter Pan production is all about special touches that add to its entertainment value. Special props to the prop master (Jenny Pinson). Hook has multiple versions of his prosthetic hand, including a toothbrush. One of my favorite moments is the glasses, umbrella and teddy bear used in the very satisfying ending. It was a nod out to the Disney version of “Peter Pan” which made me a little misty for my own childhood bedroom. Emerald City’s Peter Pan magically transports you back to Neverland. Whether it’s for the first-time or a return visit, the voyage is a fun trip!

Rating: ★★★½

Running time: Sixty minutes with no intermission. Parking lot available for earlier arrivals. This play is suitable for families with children ages 3 to 12 years .

EXTRA CREDIT:

Openings-closings this week

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show openings

 

Abagail’s Party A Red Orchid Theatre

The Analytical Engine Circle Theatre

Cocktails with Larry Miller Paramount Theatre

The Gimmick Pegasus Players

Katrina: The “K” Word Loyola University Chicago Theatre

Kenny Rogers Paramount Theatre

Love Song Buffalo Theatre Ensemble

Monks in Trouble Apollo Theater Studio

Mrs. Caliban Lifeline Theatre

The Old Settler Writers’ Theatre

Over the Tavern Noble Fool Theatricals

The Ring Cycle The Building Stage

Valentine’s Weekend Engagement River North Chicago Dance Company

What Once We Felt About Face Theatre

 

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show closings

 

American Buffalo Steppenwolf Theatre

The Artist Needs a Wife the side project

August: Osage County Ford Center for the Performing Arts/Oriental Theatre

Determination Bruised Orange Theater

F.A.T. People Gorilla Tango Theatre

Frindle Griffin Theatre

The Glass Menagerie Chicago Heights Drama Group

Keymaster/Gatekeeper Gorilla Tango Theatre

Minna Trap Door Theatre

Phedra New World Repertory Theatre

A Raisin in the Sun Merle Reskin Theatre, Depaul Theatre School

The Wedding TUTA Theatre

The Year of Magical Thinking Court Theatre

 


special ticket offers

 

$20 tickets to Distracted at American Theater Company, 1909 W. Byron Street.  American Theater Company is offering $20 tickets to the following performances only: Thursday, February 11 at 8 p.m., Saturday, February 13 at 3 p.m. and Sunday, February 14 at 3 p.m.  To purchase tickets, call (773) 409-4125 or visit www.atcweb.org and use the code "extras".

$10 tickets to Phedra by Jean Racine at Theatre Building Chicago,

1225 W Belmont.  New World Repertory Theater is offering a limited number of discount tickets for their Thursday and Friday 8:30 p.m. performances through February 14.  Call the box office at 773-327-5252 and use the code "EXTRA."

Print this email for $5 off one (1) regular priced admission for The Flaming Dames Mardi Gras themed revue, "Bourbon Street Burlesque" presented by New Millennium Theatre Company at The Spot, 4437 N. Broadway.  Show runs Friday and Saturday nights  through February 27 at 10:15 p.m. (NO PERFORMANCES FEB 12-13) and a special performance on Fat Tuesday, February 16 at 10:15 p.m. $5 dollar discount taken at box office in exchange for printed email blast.  Call 312/458-9083 for reservations or visit  www.nmtchicago.org for more information.

$15 tickets to Diamante Production’s world premiere of Lucid at the Athenaeum Theatre, 2936 N. Southport Ave.  Diamante Productions is offering a limited number of discounted tickets for the Sunday, Feb. 14, 3 p.m. performance. The discount is available for these three performances only.  This offer is only valid at the door.

REVIEW: The True Story of the 3 Pigs (Emerald City Theatre)

Hamming it up for the over 5 set!

3pigs

Emerald City Theatre presents:

The True Story of the Three Pigs

By Jon Scieszka and Lane Smith
Adapted by Alyn Cardarelli
Directed by Ernie Nolan
Thru March 25th (ticket info)

By Katy Walsh

Joe Goldammer (little pig) with Ruby Aufmann The media investigates a double ham-icide. Emerald City Theatre presents The True Story of the Three Pigs. The play starts where the three pigs fairytale ends. Two pigs are dead. The wolf is in jail. Random Adjective, a reporter, has been assigned to examine the evidence. The audience is invited to accompany her as greenhorn reporters. Her investigation leads to interviews with the surviving pig, Red Riding Hood, and the wolf. The True Story of the Three Pigs is an interactive play that teaches children that there are many sides to a story and to always cover your mouth when you sneeze.

Joe Goldammer uses distinctive voices to play multiple roles: a high pitch squeak for the surviving pig, garble growls for nana wolf, and portrays Red Riding Hood as a German research expert on wolves. Although entertaining for adults, Goldammer’s best comedic moments may be lost on the little ones. Samantha Nicodemus plays Random Adjective as a fast talking reporter from the 1940’s. Nicodemus does a great job of keeping the kids connected to what’s happening by reviewing the evidence after each interview. Matt Olson is the Big Bad Wolf or Alexander T. Wolf. In two of the crime reenactments, Olson is the stereotyped Big Bad Wolf. However, when Alexander T. Wolf gets to tell his version of the story, he is a vulnerable, misunderstood wolf with allergies. Ernie Nolan  directs the action and keeps the cast animated with exaggerated gestures to elicit giggles.

pigs2It’s obvious upon entering the Apollo Theatre that Emerald City Theatre loves kids! They keep the 60-minute show interactive. Kids volunteer to come up on stage to verify huff puff results or model reporter moxie. After each interview, the audience members (i.e., greenhorn reporters) are invited to ask questions and assess the 5 W’s and 1 H (who, what, when, where, why and how). The repetitive nature of the reenactments help the younger audience members follow the story. Emerald City also adds to the children’s theatrical experience by providing coordinating gifts and games, pre-show pig-snout-making activity and post-show autographs with the cast. The kids even decide one of three endings. Applause determines what the newspaper headline will be. (for the opening performance the greenhorn reporters voted that the wolf was actually innocent)

The show promotes its target audience as 3-8 years old. Observing the children in the audience, a 5 years-or-over rating seems more realistic. Newspaper reporter, ham on a platter, German scientist – the story has some complicated elements to follow. Although the cast has colorful costumes (Ernie Nolan), the minimal scenery isn’t visually exciting. Unable to follow the story and without colorful stimulation, the pre-schoolers may become victim to the paparazzi. They don’t care about the truth! They want the three pigs fairytale.

Rating: ★★★

Helpful links:

3LittlePigs-Emerald

Matt Olson as the Big Bad Wolf (aka Alexander T. Wolf) greets greenhorn reporters Max and Ruby after the performance.


Creative team includes: Nic Jones (lighting), Joe Court (sound), Jenny Pinson (props), Joshua Lansing (technical director) and Scott Deter (stage manager)

Theater openings and closings this week in Chicago

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show openings

 

Twas the Night Before Christmas Center for Performing Arts at Governors State

500 Clown Christmas North Central College 

American Stars in Concert for the Holidays Paramount Theatre

Civic Ballet’s The Nutcracker James Lumber Center for the Performing Arts

Icarus Lookingglass Theatre

It’s a Wonderful Life Improv Playhouse

The Klezmatics North Shore Center for the Performing Arts

The Nutcracker McAninch Arts Center

W is for Winter Prop Thtr

 

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show closings

1985 The Factory Theater (our review)

All the Fame of Lofty Deeds House Theatre  (our review)

Aunt Dan and Lemon BackStage Theatre Company

Beethoven, as I Knew Him Drury Lane Water Tower

Burlesque is More Annoyance Theatre

Carnival Nocturne – Storefront Theater  (our review)

Chad Morton’s TV Christmas Miracle Village Players Performing Arts Center

Cockettes: Christmas Spectacular Annoyance Theatre

Cold Dream Theatre

Cooperstown Theatre Seven of Chicago (our review)

The David Bowie Hepzikat Funky Velvet Flarney Solstice Spectacular Live…From Space! New Millenium Theatre

D-Cup Diatribes Gorilla Tango Theatre 

Democracy Eclipse Theatre (our review)

Faith Off Gorilla Tango Theatre

The Flaming Dames in Naughtier and Nice New Millenium Theatre

Florid Deveraux Does the Holidays Prop Thtr

Gift of the Magi EverGreen Theatre Ensemble

Gossamer Adventure Stage Chicago

Graceland Profiles Theatre 

Horrible Apollo Theatre (our review)

Hunky Dory The Factory Theater (our review)

Improv Children of the Corn 3 Corn Productions

Low Toner: Decision Quality Gorilla Tango Theatre

LUNATIC(a)S Teatro Luna (our review)

Perseus and Medusa: Or It’s All Greek to Me Piccolo Theatre

Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer Annoyance Theatre (our review)

Short Shorts Annoyance Theatre

A Silent Night: Grandma Got Run Over Without Healthcare Gorilla Tango Theatre

Souvenir Northlight Theatre (our review)

When She Danced TimeLine Theatre

Whining in the Windy City Royal George Theatre