Review: Hair (Broadway in Chicago – Oriental Theatre)

     
     

Competent ‘Hair’ revels in its own kitsch

       
     

The company from national tour of 'Hair', now playing at The Oriental Theatre.  Photo credit: Joan Marcus

  
Broadway in Chicago presents
  
Hair
  
Book/Lyrics by Gerome Ragni & James Rado
Music by
Galt MacDermot
Directed by
Diane Paulus
at the
Oriental Theatre, 24 W. Randolph (map)
through March 20  |  tickets: $27-$90  |  more info 

Reviewed by Dan Jakes

If the pre-show announcement–which asks that you please turn on your heart and to please turn off your cell phone–isn’t a clear indication, there’s plenty of proverbial winking in director Diane PaulusHair. From the restrained band volume to the affable, mostly miles-from-the-danger-line interactions between actors and audience, we’re assured from the beginning that the night’s show is going to be professional, going to be groovy, and going to be safe.

Safety, of course, was not what made Gerome Ragni and James Rado’s rock-musical about a tribe of hippies significant. It defied modern standards of decency, blazed new theatrical territory and was written and performed in the chaotic epicenter of the same cultural revolution it advocated.

Today, young, accomplished, svelte actors teeter on some house seats, take a few trips down the aisles, dry hump for effect, and stand naked for the requisite nude The company from national tour of 'Hair', now playing at The Oriental Theatre.  Photo credit: Joan Marcusscene.

But let’s face it. Entertainment value aside, The Man acquisitioned Hair a long time ago. It’s unclear when, but the changeover presumably took place some time after religious groups stopped picketing outside of performances and some time before it began running in theaters named after multi-billion dollar car companies.

During this revival, I thought about what, if any, our contemporary equivalent to the monument Hair was in its heyday for intrepidity and relevance. It’s certainly nothing that can be described in the same genre (in the grand scheme of art and provocation, rock-musicals are now, by more honest billing, lite-rock-musicals). I won’t pretend to romanticize living in the late 1960’s–one, I would not yet exist as a fetus for another two decades and two, it was a notoriously violent era of persecution, uncertainty, hate, and abused authority–but I can appreciate the time’s profound art and its ability to have instigated change.

Yet the national conflicts Ragni and Rado wrote about are still (in some cases, eerily) recognizable. Our current generation is witness to an aggressively protested war, sex as a talking point for political candidates, old white men tossing around the word “communist” to rebuke lefties, and mainstream efforts to legalize marijuana. Then is it fair to wonder if, for all its critical acclaim, this latest resurgence of Hair missed an opportunity to be more than a technically laudable send-up to a counter-cultural artifact?

Lawrence Stallings, Steel Burkhardt and Matt DeAngelis in the 'Hair' National Tour. Photo: Joan MarcusIt’s telling that during opening night’s post-curtain-call “Be-In,” where the tribe welcomes the audience onstage to dance through a reprise, the cast really had to coax people to budge. Some inevitably jumped up, but most smiled good-naturedly while inconspicuously grabbing their coats and eying the exits.

Some rapport never got established.

And some did. As Berger, Steel Burkhardt has the most opportunity to break down the fourth-wall and create a sense of community. He doesn’t as often as I‘d have liked, but his allocated moments for addressing the audience are the most entertaining, substantive parts of the show. Taking a gentle stab at an over-zealous laugher is funny–allowing another to stuff single dollar bills down his suede fringe loincloth is funny and opens up the risk and fun of watching anything-goes action. The rest of Hair could benefit from this sense of happening and authenticity.

Vocally, the ensemble is consistent, and fits well within the folk-rock style Galt MacDermot’s compositions call for. Appropriately cast, these kids look and sound like the embodiment of young idealism and acceptance. At times, they’re sublime.

Billing a show as a revival carries a certain weight, implication and spirit. I’m not confident this latest production lives up to these. But as a fully-produced tribute, it’s at least a good trip.

  
  
Rating: ★★★
   
  

Center: Paris Remillard as Claude and Steel Burkhardt as Berger, in a scene from the national tour of 'Hair'. Photo credit: Joan Marcus

Steel Burkhardt, Hair the Musical, Joan Marcus Paris Remillard, Matt DeAngelis, Hair the Musical, Joan Marcus

Hair continues through March 20th, with performances Tuesday at 7:30, Wednesday 2 and 7:30pm, Thursday 7:30pm, Friday 8pm, Saturday 2 and 8pm, and Sunday 2pm.  Tickets are $27 and $90, and can be bought at www.broadwayinchicago.com.

     
     

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REVIEW: Rain – Tribute to the Beatles (Broadway Chicago)

     
     

An Easy Day’s Night

     
     

Steve Landes, Graham Alexander, Tom Telley and Doug Cox in Rain: A Tribute to the Beatles.

  
Broadway in Chicago presents
  
Rain – A Tribute to the Beatles
   
Written by The Beatles
at
Oriental Theatre, 24 W. Randolph (map)
thru Feb 13  |  ticket: $35-$75  |  more info 

Reviewed by Lawrence Bommer

For baby boomers wanting to share their childhood with their kids, for all the true-blue or late-blooming fans of the Fab Four whose great regret is that they never got to see the world’s greatest quartet in concert, or for folks who like to watch great songs Cast playing the Fab Four - Rain-A Tribute to the Beatlesreturn to their source, Rain should be human catnip for rockers and rollers everywhere. In two hours the ardent crowd at the Oriental Theatre get back The Beatles–from their black-and-white debut on “The Ed Sullivan Show” (a 1964 debut seen by 73 million viewers) to the hippie splendor of Sergeant Pepper and His Lonely Hearts Club Band to the transcendental meditation phase that mingled with anti-war ballads to, well, just a final nostalgic sing-along that gels all their acts together.

Providing context and much non-negotiable nostalgia, projections, vintage commercials, psychedelic animation, costume changes, and closed-circuit coverage (which combine the actual audience with clips from the Beatles 1965 concert at Shea Stadium) bring the 60s to life along with the music that stamped our memories.

Like the long-running Beatlemania, this life-sized simulation of the magnificent moppets spans their too-brief career. All the classics are performed live (too many to name but how wonderfully it ends with “Let It Be” and “Hey Jude”!) by the very skilled if not always perfectly matched Steve Landes, Graham Alexander, Tom Teeley and Doug Cox, as the Liverpool legends, with Chris Smallwood on percussion and keyboards. There are a fewer lesser known gems, like “That Boy,” that might even trigger some new nostalgia, if that’s possible.

Rain - A Tribute to the Beatles - at Shea Stadium

Ironically, this retrospective has been together longer than the Beatles ever were, a testament to the persistence of fame even in tribute form. No question, this is accuracy itself, except for the fact that it’s being done in 2011 for almost three generations more than could have seen the originals. But there’s nothing like making up for lost time.

  
  
Rating: ★★★
  
  

  
  

Broadway in Chicago continues 2010-2011 Season

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Broadway in Chicago’s 2010/2010 season to include:

  • Wicked
  • Next to Normal
  • 9 to 5
  • Hair
  • Spring Awakening
  • Beauty and the Beast
  • Working
  • Peter Pan

TRACES

October 26, 2010 – January 1, 2011

Broadway Playhouse 

 

Broadway in Chicago - Traces - Broadway Playhouse7 Fingers (Les 7 doigts de la main) is an astonishingly talented French Canadian company that has pioneered a whole new brand of theatrical entertainment, and their smash-hit production, TRACES, will launch its U.S. tour in Chicago this fall. Combining awe-inspiring acrobatic training with infectious urban energy, seven performers deliver dazzling, gravity-defying displays of skill that produce “one of the most creative and inspiring pieces of entertainment I’ve ever witnessed” (Edinburgh’s The Sun)–balancing on each other’s heads, tumbling through hoops and leaping spectacularly up giant poles without using their hands. More than just a display of acrobatic brilliance, the audience is gradually drawn into the performers’ real life stories and, by the final, dramatic climax of the show, on the edge of their seats, willing them to pull off the seemingly impossible. “Mesmeric, spontaneous and unpretentious,” ( London ’s Metro), this thrill-a-minute show will leave you begging for more.

 

 


GOD OF CARNAGE

November 30 – December 12, 2010

small_God-carnage-logo The son of one couple has broken two teeth of the son of another. At first diplomatic niceties are observed, but as the couples meet to resolve things, and the rum begins to flow, huge tensions emerge and the gloves come off, leaving more than just their liberal principles in tatters. Winner of the 2009 Tony® Award for Best Play and Best Director (Matthew Warchus), GOD OF CARNAGE is “the funniest play on Broadway!” raves WOR radio.

 

 


WICKED

December 1, 2010 – January 23, 2011

wicked Entertainment Weekly calls WICKED “the best musical of the decade.” WICKED, the longest-running Broadway musical in Chicago theatre history, is returning to Chicago . Winner of 26 major awards, including a Grammy and three Tony® Awards, WICKED is Broadway’s biggest blockbuster, a cultural phenomenon and was just named “the defining musical of the decade” by The New York Times.  Long before that girl from Kansas arrives in Munchkinland, two girls meet in the land of Oz.  One–born with emerald green skin–is smart, fiery and misunderstood.  The other is beautiful, ambitious and very popular. How these two grow to become the Wicked Witch of the West and Glinda the Good makes for “the most ‘Popular’ piece of Chicago theatre in a generation” (Chris Jones, Chicago Tribune).

 


9 to 5: THE MUSICAL

January 18 – January 31, 2011

9-59 to 5: THE MUSICAL is a hilarious story of friendship and revenge in the Rolodex era. This new musical comedy, direct from Broadway, is based on the hit movie and features Dolly Parton’s original hit title song along with her new Tony® Award and Grammy nominated score. The book is by Patricia Resnick (co-writer of the original screenplay). 9 to 5: THE MUSICAL tells the story of three unlikely friends who conspire to take control of their company and learn there’s nothing they can’t do — even in a man’s world. Outrageous, thought-provoking and even a little romantic, 9 to 5: THE MUSICAL is about teaming up and taking care of business… it’s about getting credit and getting even… and it’s about to open in Chicago!

 


BURN THE FLOOR

February 1 – February 13, 2011

burnfloor The international dance sensation BURN THE FLOOR visits Chicago direct from its record-breaking run on Broadway! You’ve seen Ballroom dance on shows like “Dancing with the Stars” and “So You Think You Can Dance.” Now, with BURN THE FLOOR, you will feel, live on stage, all the passion, the drama and the sizzling excitement of 20 gorgeous champion dancers, in a true theatrical experience, a performance with a grace and athleticism that The New York Times calls, “Dazzling!” From Harlem’s hot nights at The Savoy, where dances such as the Lindy, Foxtrot and Charleston were born, to the Latin Quarter where the Cha-Cha, Rumba and Salsa steamed up the stage, BURN THE FLOOR takes audiences on a journey through the passionate drama of dance.  The elegance of the Viennese Waltz, the exuberance of the Jive, the intensity of the Paso Doble – audiences with experience them all, as well as the Tango, Samba, Mambo, Quickstep and Swing.  It’s Ballroom. Reinvented.


LES MISERABLES

February 2 – 27, 2011

Cadillac Palace Theatre

Cameron Mackintosh presents a brand new 25th anniversary production of Boublil & Schönberg’s legendary musical, Les Miserables, with glorious new staging and spectacular re-imagined scenery inspired by the paintings of Victor Hugo. This new production has already been acclaimed by critics, fans and new audiences and is breaking box office records wherever it goes. The London Times hails the new show “a five star hit, astonishingly powerful and as good as the original.” The Western Mail says “an outstanding success.”  

 


RAIN: A TRIBUTE TO THE BEATLES

February 8 – February 13, 2011

Ford Center for the Performing Arts 

Rain BeatlesRAIN, the acclaimed Beatles concert, returns by popular demand, direct from Broadway! They look like them and they sound just like them!  “The next best thing to seeing The Beatles,” raves the Denver Post.   All the music and vocals are performed totally live!  RAIN covers The Beatles from the earliest beginnings through the psychedelic late 60s and their long-haired hippie, hard-rocking rooftop days. RAIN is a multi-media, multi-dimensional experience…a fusion of historical footage and hilarious television commercials from the 1960s lights up video screens and live cameras zoom in for close-ups. “A thrilling bit of time-warping nostalgia…Boomer Heaven!” raves The Fort Worth Star-Telegram. “Uncanny! RAIN are a quartet of fine musicians in their own right…as The Beatles, they triumph!” cheers the Boston Herald.  “An adoring Valentine to The Beatles,” declares the Washington Post.  Sing along with your family and friends to such favorites as “Let It Be,” “Hey Jude,” “While My Guitar Gently Weeps,” “Come Together” and “Can’t Buy Me Love,” and relive Beatlemania from Ed Sullivan to Abbey Road!

 


WORKING

February 15 – May 8, 2011

Broadway Playhouse

Working - Broadway Playhouse - ChicagoWORKING is a vital new musical based on the book by Pulitzer Prize-winning author and Chicago ’s own Studs Terkel.  Newly adapted by Stephen Schwartz (WICKED, PIPPIN and GODSPELL), WORKING is the working man’s A CHORUS LINE.  It is a musical exploration of people from all walks of life, with twenty-six songs by all-star composers Craig Carnelia, Micki Grant, Tony Award™ winning Lin-Manuel Miranda, Mary Rodgers, Susan Birkenhead, Stephen Schwartz and Grammy Award™ winning James Taylor.  WORKING celebrates everyday people, fills you with hope and inspiration and is the perfect musical for anyone who has ever worked a day in their lives.

 


HAIR

March 8 – 15, 2011

Ford Center for the Performing Arts

The Public Theater’s 2009 Tony-winning production of HAIR is an electric celebration on stage! This exuberant musical about a group of young Americans searching for peace and love in a turbulent time has struck a resonant chord with audiences young and old. Its ground breaking rock score paved the way for some of the greatest musicals of our time. HAIR features an extraordinary cast and dozens of unforgettable songs, including “Aquarius,” “Let the Sun Shine In,” “Good Morning, Starshine” and “Easy To Be Hard.” Its relevance is UNDENIABLE. Its energy is UNBRIDLED. Its truth is UNWAVERING. It’s HAIR, and IT’S TIME.


MERCHANT OF VENICE

March 15 – 27, 2011

Bank of America Theatre 

From the acclaimed Theatre for a New Audience, the first U.S. theatre to be invited to the Royal Shakespeare Company, comes Shakespeare’s tragicomedy following command runs Off- Broadway and in Stratford-Upon-Avon . Starring Oscar winner F. Murray Abraham in his riveting portrayal of Shylock, and directed by Darko Tresnjak (former Artistic Director, Old Globe), the play has been arousing controversies for centuries with raucous and gentle comedy, tender poetry, and its struggle with mercy and justice. In this riveting update, religion, race and sexuality collide with love, family and justice and the currency of society and humanity has never been so changeable.

 


WISHFUL DRINKING

April 5 – 17, 2011

Bank of America Theatre 

WISHFUL DRINKING, Carrie Fisher’s autobiographical solo show, follows Fisher’s life. Born to celebrity parents, Fisher lands among the stars when she’s picked to play a princess in a little movie called ‘Star Wars.’ But her story isn’t all sweetness and light sabers. As a single mom, she also battles addiction, depression, mental institutions, and that awful hyperspace hairdo. It’s an incredible tale–from having her father leave her mother for Elizabeth Taylor to marrying and divorcing singer/songwriter Paul Simon, from having the father of her baby leave her for a man to waking up one morning and finding a friend dead beside her in bed. Don’t miss this opportunity to see Carrie Fisher’s hit Broadway show.

 


NEXT TO NORMAL

April 26 – May 8, 2011

Bank of America Theatre 

 

Next to Normal - Broadway in ChicagoFrom the director of Rent comes the most talked about new show on Broadway, NEXT TO NORMAL, winner of the 2010 Pulitzer Prize for Drama and three 2009 Tony Awards including Best Score.  Alice Ripley who received the 2009 Tony Award for Best Actress in a Musical, will reprise her acclaimed performance in Chicago . Having been chosen as “one of the year’s ten best” by major critics around the country, NEXT TO NORMAL is an emotional powerhouse of a musical with a thrilling contemporary score about a family trying to take care of themselves and each other.  The New York Times calls NEXT TO NORMAL “a brave, breathtaking musical.  A work of muscular grace and power.  It is much more than a feel-good musical; it is a feel-everything musical.” Rolling Stone raves, “It is the best musical of the season – by a mile.  It’ll pin you to your seat.”


PETER PAN

Begins April 29, 2011

Chicago Tribune Freedom Center North

 

Peter Pan Chicago - Tribune Freedom Center North - Broadway in ChicagoBroadway In Chicago and threesixty° entertainment are excited to announce a unique event – a spectacular new production of J M Barrie’s classic story, PETER PAN, at the Chicago Tribune Freedom Center. Conceived by an award-winning creative team, the SMASH HIT Peter Pan features twenty-two actors, stunning puppets, epic music and dazzling flying sequences surrounded by breathtaking video projection using the world’s first 360-degree CGI theater set. Both cast and audience fly over Edwardian London. Performed in a state-of-the-art theater pavilion, this magical new “in-the-round” production of Peter Pan is an extraordinary experience for the whole family.

 


SPRING AWAKENING

May 3 – 8, 2011

Bank of America Theatre 

Spring Awakening - Broadway in ChicagoThe winner of 8 Tony Awards, including Best Musical – told by Duncan Sheik and Steven Sater through “The most gorgeous Broadway score this decade” (Entertainment Weekly) – SPRING AWAKENING explores the journey from adolescence to adulthood with poignancy and passion you will never forget. The landmark musical SPRING AWAKENING is an electrifying fusion of morality, sexuality and rock & roll that is exhilarating audiences across the nation like no other musical in years. Join this group of late 19th century German students on their passage, as they navigate teenage self-discovery and coming of age anxiety in a powerful celebration of youth and rebellion in the daring, remarkable SPRING AWAKENING. “Broadway may never be the same again!” NY TIMES

 


DISNEY’S BEAUTY AND THE BEAST 

June 28 – July 10, 2011

Broadway in Chicago - Beauty and the BeastThe romantic Broadway musical for all generations, NETworks presentation of DISNEY’S BEAUTY AND THE BEAST, the smash hit Broadway musical, returns to Chicago ! Based on the Academy Award-winning animated feature film, this eye-popping spectacle has won the hearts of over 35 million people worldwide. Hailed by the Chicago Sun-Times as “warm and winning performances, a tuneful score, and real heart,” the classic musical love story is filled with unforgettable characters, lavish sets and costumes, and dazzling production numbers including “Be Our Guest” and the beloved title song. Experience the romance and enchantment of DISNEY’S BEAUTY AND THE BEAST!



 

TICKETS

Group tickets are currently available for all of the 2011 Season Series shows.  Groups of 15 or more may receive a discount on most shows by calling (312) 977-1710.  2011 Season Series subscription packages will go on-sale to new subscribers on September 12, 2010.  Broadway In Chicago gift certificates, which can be redeemed for any production or for season ticket packages, can be obtained at Broadway In Chicago box offices, www.BroadwayInChicago.com or by calling Ticketmaster at (800) 775-2000.

 

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Essay-Review: Billy Elliot – A teaching moment?

Miners Association

Billy Elliot: A teaching moment?

 

 

J.P. Viernes as Billyby Paige Listerud

There shouldn’t be any trouble with the critically acclaimed and multiple award-winning show Billy Elliot, but there is. Simply put, the music – composed by Elton John – is gorgeous, the songs, memorable. The dialogue is, by turns, funny and frank—at appropriate moments brutally unsentimental and at others deeply touching. Under Stephen Daldry’s cunning direction, Billy Elliot successfully veers from hardcore expressionism to utter escapist fantasy. It’s a heartwarming tale about a child achieving his dreams against horrendous odds. All the same, while stuffed to the gills with sterling inter-generational talent, this multilayered production just isn’t putting bums in the seats at the Oriental Theatre the way Wicked did. Broadway in Chicago invited us to its “bloggers’ bash” last Thursday, no doubt to generate a fresh injection of press. Yet, shockingly, little more than half the theater was filled on a Thursday night.

So just what is the trouble with Billy?

  • Its rough language turns off too many parents. Hard to believe that this could be a concern in an urban setting, but this is the Midwest. Marketing Billy Elliot as a family show because of its plethora of child talent may have crashed on the reefs of American conservatism over language. Certainly the movie version, when it came to the US, received an R rating for adult language, which later transformed to a PG-13 rating upon DVD release. Much as I might wish that both parents and children could appreciate the touch of realism that Lee Hall has scripted for his Northern industrial English town, my sentiments may be completely overridden by parents not wanting one more cultural inducement for their kids to engage in verbal shock and awe.
  • It’s the economy stupid. Say what you want about uplifting messages about a talented dancing boy achieving his dreams, Billy Elliot is dark. Billy (J.P. Viernes for our performance) makes it to the Royal Ballet in London, but his small town community is going down. It’s 1984 and Margaret Thatcher is shutting down the UK’s national coal mining industry in favor of cheap coal from the Eastern bloc states. 300,000 jobs are all going bye-bye–forever. Try wringing a positive message out of that scenario as America double dips into the Great Recession (Great Depression for people of color) and the Democrats lose the gains they made in Congress two years ago.

So it’s not just the dirty words—Billy Elliot is crashing on the reefs of America’s economic and political turmoil. Would that the show itself could be a teaching moment about the value of survival in hard times. The trouble is that the only person surviving decently is Billy . . . and he survives because he is exceptionally talented, because his talent holds youthful promise, and because his future career is in the arts, not coal mining. The UK still subsidizes the arts far more than the US—but even that funding is facing a 25% cut under the current government.

Emily Skinner, Cesar Corrales and CastWhat may be an even more important point, emotionally and dramatically speaking, is that Billy is a lonely survivor. The production creates an infinitely potent moment of loss and isolation with the number “Once We Were Kings.” The miners, defeated after their struggle with the Thatcher government, descend into the darkness of the mining pit with only the lights on their helmets showing. Billy watches them depart—his own shadow cast long, black and solitary behind him. One way of life is ending while Billy’s is just beginning. Melancholy infuses Billy’s singular success at the Royal  Ballet. Billy makes his escape to London—but he cannot take the rest of his family or community with him.

Sadly, this just may be more realism than American audiences are ready to pay for in our country’s present situation. Ironically, Billy Elliot is just as much about human beings resorting to fantasy as a way to cope with hard times. This production contains incredible moments of fun and beautiful fantasy. Billy’s dance number with his young friend Michael (Dillon Stevens), complete with a cadre of 20-foot tap-dancing dress, is a flight into reverie over the joy of women’s clothing for the young cross-dresser. Other fantasy moments expand into profound theatrical expressions.

J.P. Viernes and Samuel PergandeOne of the deep pleasures of this production, over and above the movie version, is that we do not actually witness Billy as an adult ballet star. Future success is only hinted at during Billy’s dance with his older self (Samuel Pergande) to the music of Swan Lake. Peter Darling’s choreography and Rick Fisher’s lighting design evoke a scene that recalls William Wordsworth’s “The Child is Father of the Man.” The audience is moved to hope and dream with Billy because it can glimpse the fulfillment of his human potential through Viernes and Pergande’s grace and control.

Darling’s choreography even makes profound social statements about the nature of children’s lives under violent labor-busting conditions. The dance number “Solidarity” is by far the high point of the show. Darling intricately weaves together the feminine setting of Mrs. Wilkinson’s dance class with the outer masculine sparring between miners and police. Billy may tussle with the girls to keep up with Mrs. Wilkinson’s dance orders, but the children seem protected and separate from the struggle that is determining the course of their lives. Darling’s choreography stunningly reveals just how illusory separation is. It brings together the two disparate worlds of Billy’s universe and the lyrics of the song even comment on the blue-collar connections between the police and the striking miners. That’s a lot to achieve in one number and the cast pulls it off fantastically.

In fact, let’s just say here that every dance number is fantastic. Only the first act finale, “Angry Dance” pales, seeming rather anti-climactic, compared to the rest. Billy’s secret ballet lessons with Mrs. Wilkinson (Emily Skinner) have been exposed. Billy’s Dad (Armand Schulz) has just forbidden both them and his chance to audition at the Royal Ballet in London. So far as Billy’s family and the other miners are concerned, ballet is for “poofs.” Billy’s angry dance afterwards meshes with the violence erupting in town, since the police have just violently attacked Billy’s brother Tony (Patrick Mulvey – see picture below the fold).

Tommy Batchelor and Police Shields But once again, the choreography positions Billy as a lonely warrior against forces beyond his control. He alone faces a line of riot police with their ominous shields. Even as symbolism, the image is heavy-handed. Surely the rage and bloodshed that the whole community faces is worth some representation on stage. Having set Billy up as the boy who is “different” from the rest—because of his love for dance–he cannot at this point stand in for the whole community. As much as Fisher’s stark, expressionist lighting packs a powerful punch, the act of isolating Billy as if he were the only one suffering diminishes the powerful communal statement of the entire production and does not cleanly communicate Billy’s rage.

  • Billy is different from other boys. Billy is tacitly queer. Could the social conservatism of Billy’s mining town, circa 1984, have its mirror reflection in the urban and suburban environs of 2010 Chicago? That’s difficult to say. So long as documentaries like Straight-laced: How Gender’s Got Us All Tied Up reveal kids being harassed and bullied just for wearing scarves or pastel colors; so long as youngsters commit suicide because of anti-gay harassment at school – messages that promote tolerance regarding sexual identity and gender expression will always be needed in America.

A message of acceptance and tolerance, of appreciating differences, not denying, hiding or shunning them—this is the core message of Billy Elliot. One wonders whether this message, too, has been overwhelmed by our current economic troubles. Billy needs to escape the economic reality that his family and community confront. But the cost to him seems to be any close association with family and community. Few moments inspire more than when, not only Billy’s family realizes that he has to have his chance, but the entire community of rough and rugged miners offer up what little money they have left to get him to his audition in London. At that moment, Billy’s queerness seems to make no difference and their funding of his aspirations becomes their last, noble expression of “Solidarity Forever.”

Billy makes it out because of his exceptional talent. Heaven help the poor queer kid in a rough mining town who is simply average. At the end of the show, Billy gives his queer buddy, Michael, a goodbye peck on the cheek. Heaven help Michael because his community’s homophobia is not over and done with, whatever they have done for Billy. Michael still has to grow into queer adulthood. On top of that, he now has to grow up with extreme economic disadvantages to himself, his family, and his community—something that won’t make the homophobia go away. One of the terrifying things about economic crises is that people often go looking for an Other to scapegoat—whether that Other is queer, immigrant, or a member of a minority.

Is Billy Elliot’s message of acceptance, then, too narrow for our times? What one has with Billy’s acceptance by his family, the endorsement of his community, and with Billy and Michael’s own personal self-acceptance, is a brief respite from the punishing restrictions of sexuality and gender prejudice. It hardly seems enough in the face of government-sponsored economic terrorism–but they have to make do with what they have. And so do we.

Right now, that may not be enough for the American public, at least in terms of entertainment. Billy Elliot is such a big, rich and complex musical treat but it cannot do it all. One can only hope that this superb production has what it takes to survive the current climate.

   
   
Rating: ★★★½
   
   

Billy Elliot is currently playing at the Ford Center/Oriental Theatre through January 15. Individual tickets range in price from $30 to $100, and can be bought at all Broadway in Chicago box offices (24 W. Randolph, 151 W. Randolph and 18 W. Monroe), the Broadway in Chicago ticket line at 800-775-2000, all Ticketmaster retail locations (including Hot Tix), and online at www.BroadwayinChicago.com. For groups of 15 or more, call 312-977-1710.  For more information, visit www.BillyElliotChicago.com.

Corrales, Skinner, Hammond and Ballet Girls

 

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Broadway in Chicago announces 2011 Spring Season

Broadway in Chicago’s 2011 Spring Season


The 2011 Spring Season Series emphasizes Broadway In Chicago’s long-standing commitment to bringing the best of Broadway to Chicago . The complete season lineup, including performance dates, is as follows:

 

February 2 – 27, 2011

   
   
  Les Misérables Cadillac Palace Theatre
   
  Cameron Mackintosh presents a brand new 25th anniversary production of Boublil & Schönberg’s legendary musical, Les Miserables, with glorious new staging and spectacular re-imagined scenery inspired by the paintings of Victor Hugo. This new production has already been acclaimed by critics, fans and new audiences and is breaking box office records wherever it goes. The London Times hails the new show “a five star hit, astonishingly powerful and as good as the original.” The Western Mail says “an outstanding success.”   
   

 

February 15 – May 8, 2011

   
   
  Working – Broadway Playhouse
   
  WORKING is a vital new musical based on the book by Pulitzer Prize-winning author and Chicago ’s own Studs Terkel.  Newly adapted by Stephen Schwartz (WICKED, PIPPIN and GODSPELL), WORKING is the working man’s A CHORUS LINE.  It is a musical exploration of people from all walks of life, with twenty-six songs by all-star composers Craig Carnelia, Micki Grant, Tony Award™ winning Lin-Manuel Miranda, Mary Rodgers, Susan Birkenhead, Stephen Schwartz and Grammy Award™ winning James Taylor.  WORKING celebrates everyday people, fills you with hope and inspiration and is the perfect musical for anyone who has ever worked a day in their lives.
   

 

March 8 – 15, 2011

   
   
  Hair – Ford Center for the Performing Arts
   
  The Public Theater’s 2009 Tony-winning production of HAIR is an electric celebration on stage! This exuberant musical about a group of young Americans searching for peace and love in a turbulent time has struck a resonant chord with audiences young and old. Its ground breaking rock score paved the way for some of the greatest musicals of our time. HAIR features an extraordinary cast and dozens of unforgettable songs, including “Aquarius,” “Let the Sun Shine In,” “Good Morning, Starshine” and “Easy To Be Hard.” Its relevance is UNDENIABLE. Its energy is UNBRIDLED. Its truth is UNWAVERING. It’s HAIR, and IT’S TIME.
   

March 15 – 27, 2011

   
   
  Merchant of Venice – Bank of America Theatre
   
  From the acclaimed Theatre for a New Audience, the first U.S. theatre to be invited to the Royal Shakespeare Company, comes Shakespeare’s tragicomedy following command runs Off- Broadway and in Stratford-Upon-Avon . Starring Oscar winner F. Murray Abraham in his riveting portrayal of Shylock, and directed by Darko Tresnjak (former Artistic Director, Old Globe), the play has been arousing controversies for centuries with raucous and gentle comedy, tender poetry, and its struggle with mercy and justice. In this riveting update, religion, race and sexuality collide with love, family and justice and the currency of society and humanity has never been so changeable.
   

 

April 5 – 17, 2011

   
   
  Wishful Drinking – Bank of American Theatre
   
  WISHFUL DRINKING, Carrie Fisher’s autobiographical solo show, follows Fisher’s life. Born to celebrity parents, Fisher lands among the stars when she’s picked to play a princess in a little movie called ‘Star Wars.’ But her story isn’t all sweetness and light sabers. As a single mom, she also battles addiction, depression, mental institutions, and that awful hyperspace hairdo. It’s an incredible tale–from having her father leave her mother for Elizabeth Taylor to marrying and divorcing singer/songwriter Paul Simon, from having the father of her baby leave her for a man to waking up one morning and finding a friend dead beside her in bed. Don’t miss this opportunity to see Carrie Fisher’s hit Broadway show.
   

 

 

April 26 – May 8, 2011

   
   
  Next to Normal – Bank of America Theatre
   
  From the director of Rent comes the most talked about new show on Broadway, NEXT TO NORMAL, winner of the 2010 Pulitzer Prize for Drama and three 2009 Tony Awards including Best Score.  Alice Ripley who received the 2009 Tony Award for Best Actress in a Musical, will reprise her acclaimed performance in Chicago . Having been chosen as “one of the year’s ten best” by major critics around the country, NEXT TO NORMAL is an emotional powerhouse of a musical with a thrilling contemporary score about a family trying to take care of themselves and each other.  The New York Times calls NEXT TO NORMAL “a brave, breathtaking musical.  A work of muscular grace and power.  It is much more than a feel-good musical; it is a feel-everything musical.” Rolling Stone raves, “It is the best musical of the season – by a mile.  It’ll pin you to your seat.”
   

The lineup will also feature the opportunity for priority purchase of the following 2011 Off-Season Specials:

 

April 26 – May 8, 2011

   
   
  Rain: A Tribute to the Beatles
   
  RAIN, the acclaimed Beatles concert, returns by popular demand, direct from Broadway! They look like them and they sound just like them!  “The next best thing to seeing The Beatles,” raves the Denver Post.   All the music and vocals are performed totally live!  RAIN covers The Beatles from the earliest beginnings through the psychedelic late 60s and their long-haired hippie, hard-rocking rooftop days. RAIN is a multi-media, multi-dimensional experience…a fusion of historical footage and hilarious television commercials from the 1960s lights up video screens and live cameras zoom in for close-ups. “A thrilling bit of time-warping nostalgia…Boomer Heaven!” raves The Fort Worth Star-Telegram. “Uncanny! RAIN are a quartet of fine musicians in their own right…as The Beatles, they triumph!” cheers the Boston Herald.  “An adoring Valentine to The Beatles,” declares the Washington Post.  Sing along with your family and friends to such favorites as “Let It Be,” “Hey Jude,” “While My Guitar Gently Weeps,” “Come Together” and “Can’t Buy Me Love,” and relive Beatlemania from Ed Sullivan to Abbey Road!
   

 

May 3 – 8, 2011

   
   
  Spring Awakening – Bank of America Theatre
   
  The winner of 8 Tony Awards, including Best Musical – told by Duncan Sheik and Steven Sater through “The most gorgeous Broadway score this decade” (Entertainment Weekly) – SPRING AWAKENING explores the journey from adolescence to adulthood with poignancy and passion you will never forget. The landmark musical SPRING AWAKENING is an electrifying fusion of morality, sexuality and rock & roll that is exhilarating audiences across the nation like no other musical in years. Join this group of late 19th century German students on their passage, as they navigate teenage self-discovery and coming of age anxiety in a powerful celebration of youth and rebellion in the daring, remarkable SPRING AWAKENING. “Broadway may never be the same again!” NY TIMES
   

 

June 28 – July 10, 2011

   
   
  Disney’s Beauty and the Beast
   
  The romantic Broadway musical for all generations, NETworks presentation of DISNEY’S BEAUTY AND THE BEAST, the smash hit Broadway musical, returns to Chicago ! Based on the Academy Award-winning animated feature film, this eye-popping spectacle has won the hearts of over 35 million people worldwide. Hailed by the Chicago Sun-Times as “warm and winning performances, a tuneful score, and real heart,” the classic musical love story is filled with unforgettable characters, lavish sets and costumes, and dazzling production numbers including “Be Our Guest” and the beloved title song. Experience the romance and enchantment of DISNEY’S BEAUTY AND THE BEAST! 
   

 

2011 Broadway In Chicago Spring Season Series ticket holders will receive a multitude of special benefits, including savings up to 64%, priority seating at each venue, ticket exchange privileges, pre-paid and discounted parking, access to gift cards to give tickets as gifts, as well as the first opportunity to purchase additional tickets to future Broadway In Chicago productions, including those not currently listed in the 2011 Season Series.  2011 Season Series subscription packages are on sale now, and are available by logging onto www.BroadwayInChicago.com or calling the Season Ticket Hotline at (312) 977-1717.

Group tickets are currently available for all of the 2011 Season Series shows.  Groups of 15 or more may receive a discount on most shows by calling (312) 977-1710.  2011 Season Series subscription packages will go on-sale to new subscribers on September 12, 2010.  Broadway In Chicago gift certificates, which can be redeemed for any production or for season ticket packages, can be obtained at Broadway In Chicago box offices, www.BroadwayInChicago.com or by calling Ticketmaster at (800) 775-2000.

Individuality – Conversations with Billy Elliot cast

Emily Skinner, Cesar Corrales and Cast

INDIVIDUALITY
Conversations with the Chicago Cast of Billy Elliot the Musical

By Michael L. Harris

From London’s West End to Sydney and Melbourne Australia, on Broadway and now in Chicago, Billy Elliot the Musical is taking the world by storm or perhaps by dance… It is, according to the New York Post, “The best show you will ever see.” And in my opinion they got that one right. After its opening two years ago on Broadway it won an astounding 10 Tony Awards.  At the 63th Annual Tony Award’s Sir Elton John said: “At its heart Billy Elliot is about a child’s emotional struggle for his right to dance and a community’s economic struggle for its right to work.” From beginning to end Billy Elliot the Musical is exhilarating and its message of struggle for individual expression and is never compromised. “The world’s bad enough without making it worse…what we need is in-di-vid-u-al-ity.”

Set in a background of political struggle in the small UK mining community of Durham, Billy Elliot is an adaptation of the award winning film by Stephen Daldry with music by Sir Elton John. Billy Elliot’s Chicago production is the show’s first US touring company.  A second US touring company opens in Durham, NC later in 2010 as does a Seoul, Korea production.  A Toronto opening is scheduled for 2011.

Billy Elliot’s Chicago run began on April 11th of this year.  The Daldry/John team was equally as hands on with this production as they have been with all other world-wide productions of the show. Daldry actually directed the show though a resident director, which ‘keeps the show in very, very good shape” says Cynthia Darlow, who plays grandma. Both Daldry and Sir Elton not only attended the opening night performance, they also donned tutus and joined the cast onstage for the finale!

The Billy Elliot story is so universal and so timely, yet timeless, that it relates on a soul-stirring level to every culture, race and individual. And whether intentional or serendipitous, the casting of an array of multi-cultural boys to play the lead role of Billy Elliot has only enhanced that message.

I recently had an opportunity to sit down with four members of the Chicago cast, and learn first hand from these extraordinary actors who are, night after night, Billy Elliot the Musical – Chicago.

J.P. Viernes as Billy 2 J.P. Viernes (Billy Elliot)

J.P. Viernes is of Philippine decent and makes his home in Half-Moon Bay California, a suburb of San Francisco. “I think my first audition was two years ago, I’ve gone through about five auditions already…they called me back a bunch of times…it was really fun, but it was really long.” J.P. was cast as one of the Chicago Billys. The role of Billy Elliot, the 12 year old lead character whose amazing dance moves and vocals solidify the show’s message is a role so demanding that it requires four young actors and an additional understudy or two to insure its energy charged eight show-a-week demands.

Inspired by his sister to start dancing at the age of seven, J.P. talked about his training for the role. “We started training for the show last November and from November ‘til December we trained in New York and then when 2010 came around came here to Chicago to train. A usual day begins at 10 A.M. …because “we also have to fit in 15-hours a week of school” in addition to the daily dance and gymnastics training. While that may not seem early, their typical day doesn’t end until midnight.  “Doing the show is really fun, but we have to rehearse to build up all the stamina we need for doing the show…” Rather than a distraction J.P. sees school as “kind of a rest just not to be moving around all the time,” though he misses his “friends at home.” The “last time I visited was at Christmas and I was only able to visit for three days.” His mom is with him in Chicago but his dad remains in California.

There’s a lot of hard work and sacrifice that goes along with the on-stage glamour. All that work has helped J.P. to better understand the character he plays. “I see Billy as a really creative kid…he really likes to dance…he really wants to dance…and  I think we can all relate to him, (referring to the four boys who play Billy) because we like to dance too and also because he went through a lot of challenges to get where he wants to be. And that also happened with us in trying to get to where Samuel Pergande and J.P. Vierneswe are now and playing Billy Elliot.” The young Billys are on stage dancing and singing throughout most if the 3 hour show, JP’s favorite dance is the finale ”it’s really fun and it’s like just a big celebration.” The choreography while generally consistent from Billy to Billy, is in part individualized to each. Particularly the dance number for “electricity” the song/dance Billy does in describing how it feels when he is dancing.

“When [people] see the show, I think they’re really going to like the dancing…and … the story too cuz it’s really emotional, there’s happy parts, sad parts, angry parts … it’s just a really nice show, and … its entertaining, I think that’s the main thing. The different casting brings different styles to each show so it kind of like makes the show different for everybody. So you could like see me one night and it would be way different from Giuseppe’s (another Billy) performance and I think that’s a really cool thing to see … I think more people can relate to it that way.

While he misses swimming in the ocean he loves interacting with the other cast members. He says Granma is “really funny and she’s really nice to all of us Billys and I think she’s a great actor.” On Mondays, his day off, J.P. can be found playing with the other boys in the local park. “We play games and have nerf-gun fights and last Monday they played some football.” 

J.P. says people might be surprised by the fact that he’s 13 “cuz I’m pretty short.” Though amazingly when these talented young men are on stage they look pretty tall, maybe that is only because they are filling pretty big shoes. In fact, most of the cast members are pretty short off-stage. I nearly walked past Gabriel Rush, one of the two Michaels in the Chicago Billy cast, though you certainly couldn’t over look his show-stopping on-stage performance of, “Expressing Yourself.”

 

Armand Schultz and Cesar Corrales Armand Schultz (Jacky Elliot, father)

Armand Schultz, who plays Billy’s father, Jackie Elliot, was trained as a classical actor and is no newcomer to the theatre. He, like the show itself, had runs on both Broadway and the London stage. Our discussion started off with a bang when I asked his take on the shows multi-ethnic casting: “Wow! I don’t even consider the different ethnicities, it doesn’t even affect me… each kid is his own individual, he’s his own person, but because I’m their dad, on any given night I just see four 12 or 13 year old kids who are just basically playing my son. They all have their own different energies but I wouldn’t consider that an ethnicity thing. I don’t even think it was the directors’ intent to do it…they literally went out to find the most talented young men they could find and it didn’t matter who they were… I saw it originally in London and the overall effect of the show affected me more than the kid… I think the most important thing is that you make a link between yourself and the boy…in terms of what part of that kid you see in yourself and that’s why the show is great part… I think that the story is so powerful and that what’s actually happening between the boy and his family and the boy and his life is so powerful that if you didn’t make that ethnic connection with that kid you would still have that same connection.

“What I think is really interesting about the show; the grouping of people, is that the show is not Americanized. It still takes place in a very rural North Country English town … it doesn’t look like America which is another reason why I think people will relate to the story in a different way, because it is a little bit removed from them. It doesn’t..it isn’t really them … I think a lot of times where you see film or you see shows where you go ‘oh that’s my backyard’ you relate to it in one way, but when you see it a little bit removed from it, I think you see a little bit of the universality of what’s actually happening in the story and I think that is a really big plus for the show.”

You’ve done a lot of classical work…how does that fit into this? “I know how to yell eight times a week??” He says a comic aside. “In a classical play you always have to work on the language to make it real…“I don’t know that these characters are larger than life. They’re sort of…of life, in most Shakespeare plays (for example) people are very large, they’re very large thinkers, he writes so incredibly well that their thoughts are huge, the Shakespearean text usually tells a lot about character, I think the action in this play tells more about character than the text. It’s the things that people do or don’t do with regard to their children, or with regard to the people around them that speaks loud…”

Patrick Mulvey, Cynthia Darlow and Miners Cynthia Darlow (Grandma)

Cynthia Darlow, is also a seasoned veteran and was a former cast member of the Broadway production of Billy Elliot before coming to Chicago.  Playing Grandma in a musical is a change from most of her former roles in more legitimate theatre. Cynthia who has two knee replacements several years ago is amazed to find herself in another musical. “I thought my dancing days were over…”

Cynthia had not seen the show until four friends who has seen it came along and said, “There’s a part in that show for you.” So she “bit the bullet” and went to see it. And “I said to my husband
‘Oh my God, I love this show, I have got to do this part, this show means the world to me.” Cynthia confides that she had a similar experience to Billy Elliot when a teacher took a personal interest in her career, driving her to and paying for her college boards.

The role of grandma has been expanded from the original film in which she was a fairly minor character. Here she sings and dances with the best of them … While grandma is now in her declining years and “suffers from a bit of dementia, I think she’s indomitable…she had a tough marriage and an abusive marriage, but she stood up. They were passionate and I think she would do it all over again if she had to.  The song she sings, “We’d Go Dancing” gives us an insight into her life philosophy” which Cynthia paraphrases as:  “if I had all to do over I’d say screw everybody, I’d go dancing and I never would stay sober…she’s a character, I love her.” She’s already told Stephen Daldry she’s “a lifer, I’ll play this part for as long as they’ll have me.”

However, her first reaction when asked to come to Chicago was “No…I’m a happily married woman and I knew it was at least a year’s commitment, but my husband told me I was crazy if I didn’t go in on it.” Plus he promised to come to Chicago twice a month to see her. “It’s actually made the marriage great…it’s been like a honeymoon” she says with a chuckle.

This show is “timeless…it’s a rags to riches story, it’s a coming of age story, it’s a political story…it’s just got everything going for it. The music is beautiful, written by someone who’s very popular.” She is of course referring to Sir Elton John, who not only came to opening night but donned a tutu and joined the rest of the cast in the finale. He also asked that the cast remain on stage following the performance so that he could greet “every one of us personally and he actually kissed me right on the face.” Cynthia grins.

In the “true sense of a musical” Cynthia says while you may not come out humming a song (criticism of some people,) you “don’t come to the theatre to hear the next top-ten single – you come to see the story being told and you only write a song (in a musical) when there is nothing else you can say…you have to sing. And what is being expressed is beyond the ability of mere words to communicate.” I had to confess however that I came out singing.

“When you are in a musical you really have to be like an Olympic athlete. It really does take a lot out of you. I work out every day, I vocalize, I watch my diet, I warm up for at least 15 minutes before the show…this is a show you cannot do unless you are in top condition. You have to be very, very disciplined. It’s a whole different muscle set than you use in a straight play.”

Cynthia believes the most important message of the show is “Don’t be afraid to be yourself.” And her advice to potential audience members is “don’t miss it.”

Miners Association 

Keean Johnson (Michael, Billy’s best friend)

Keean Johnson plays Michael, Billy’s flamboyant friend. The role of Michael in the stage version is also greatly expanded from the film and adds a new dimension to the shows message of individual expression. Keean’s show-stopping performance as Michael is incredible. He was also one of the Broadway cast members to join the Chicago cast. 

Unlike other cast members, Keean was asked to audition for Billy Elliot and originally auditioned for the lead role in the original Broadway cast. When four other boys were chose for that spot he filled the featured role of “Tall Boy” on Broadway for 400 performances without missing a single one. Later he was given the opportunity to move into the role of Michael which he played on Broadway until he was given the option of coming to Chicago to originate the role as part of the first U.S. touring company, an offer he eagerly accepted.

Originally from Colorado, Keean confesses that he loves the city. “I love the noises.” He loves acting and dancing and wants to make a career of it. “Playing Michael is such a challenge but so rewarding.”

What’s great about the show is that “Anyone can be Billy, it doesn’t matter what they look like, it’s their ability to dance and everyone in the show is just amazing.” Keean finds that working with different actors each night keeps the show “fresh.” And while the accent was a challenge, Keean had a bit of a head-start since his real-life father is English.

Keean’s training includes cardio on days when he is on stand-by and a warm up with the Ballet Girls and safety training on nights when he is performing and he takes about 1-12 hours of personal dance instruction a week. As one of only 2 Michaels he is on stand-by or performing every day except Mondays when the theatre is dark.

Even on Mondays he has a variety of dance classes including tap (which is featured in several of the Billy numbers.) But Monday is also the day when all of the 12-13 year Billys and Michaels meet in the park for football and rugby and to just be boys. On any given night after the performance you are also likely to see Keean making his way down the street in the company of family on a skateboard or scooter, and he can’t wait to try out for the upcoming Kid’s Chicago Triathlon that he and his brother plan to enter..

While his character Michael is presented as being gay, Keean believes that Michael is a boy struggling for his own identity and not really knowing for sure if he is (gay). He also believe that Michael is largely the product of the environment in which he has grown up and may not have totally come to grips yet with his own sexual identity. “It’s definitely a challenge…but I love the role.”

“I think the biggest message of the show is to love what you do. Too many people live their lives in other peoples shadow … we all need to learn to “express” our true passion. … no matter what it takes, no matter what it pays, … if you love to do it … that’s the best, … for me it’s theatre, I love it and I want to do it for the rest of my life.” His advice to other kids that want to go into show business is to “keep on training” and keep on trying.

In addition to the talented boys in the show, the cast includes a company of amazing girls who play the ballet students of a washed up dance instructor, Mrs. Wilkinson, played by Emily Skinner (pictured in photo below). Although her life has become drab and cynical she recognizes and nurtures young Billy’s talent.

Corrales, Skinner, Hammond and Ballet Girls

If you are a theater lover you won’t want to miss this amazing show. Chicago is the closest it will get to most of us in the Midwest until it opens in St. Louis late in 2011. And while it shows every sign of a good long life in Chicago you may want to see it early so you can see it again and again. After all, there are four Billys and two Michaels that you’ve just got to see before it ends. In addition to J.P Viernes, the rest of the Billys include Tommy Batchelor (another Broadway transplant), Giuseppe Bausilio and Cesar Corrales. Keean Johnson and Gabriel Rush alternate as Michael. Billy Elliot is at the Oriental Theatre. Tickets are available from Ticketmaster

Billy's Under Theatre Lights 

———-
MICHAEL L HARRIS is a freelance writer and Independent filmmaker. His short-film trilogy “Samuel – A Journey of Discovery” will be showing at film festivals around the country this summer. Michael makes his home in Northern Indiana. Comments and inquiries may be directed to filmmaker1954@aol.com.

All photos courtesy of Joan Marcus

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Watch: cool video of Billy Elliot opening night

New video just posted by Broadway in Chicago – as you can tell, opening night of Billy Elliot was a lot of fun and a big success (see our review here★★★½).  Take a look-see!

[Check out more videos HERE]