Sanity Break: Chicago floating in the clouds – beautiful!

  
  

Now this is Chicago like you’ve never seen it before. Breathtaking!!

   

  

Video by Craig Shimala.  Love it!

  
  

Review: War and Peace: A Dance Theater Short (Viaduct)

 
 

A scintillating evening of dance and theater

  
  

Prologue to "War and Peace: A Dance Theater Short" at Viaduct Theatre, adapted and choreographed by Jim Manganello

   
Jim Manganello presents
   
   
War and Peace: A Dance Theater Short
       
Adapted and Directed by Jim Manganello
Choreography by Amanda Timm and Sarah Fornace
at Viaduct Theatre, 3111 N. Western Ave. (map)
through May 22  |  tickets: $15  |  more info

Reviewed by K.D. Hopkins

War and Peace: A Dance Theater Short is a collaboration of theater and dance companies. They are some of the best that Chicago and London across the pond offers. The result is a funny, relevant, and brilliant evening of theater. The artists and the support team hail from Redmoon, The London International School of the Performing Arts, Starkid, and Collaboraction.

Luke Couzens and Dustin Valenta fight in "War and Peace: A Dance Theater Short" at Viaduct Theatre, adapted and choreographed by Jim ManganelloTolstoy’s novel of the aristocracy, patriotism, and Napoleonic aggression rings frighteningly true of today’s society and the conflicts the world over.

This adaptation strips the novel down to a stark set with meager props. The set is colored in by the actors and dancers in a frenzy of stage combat, graceful dance, satirical renderings of the aristocracy, and stark reminders of the cost of war.

The players in this piece are exceptional together and individually. The timing for satire is more crucial that what is needed for traditional comedy. The segment of Napoleon being bathed, fed, and dressed while in the midst of a tirade is visual poetry. Napoleon, played by Marc Frost, is rolled in on a table stuffed with his limbs out in a zinc washtub. His head is adorned with a gilded laurel crown. From there is a brilliant pantomime of scrub, rinse and powdering the mini tyrant. Frost’s nudity is covered by a perfectly timed placement of towels and bath accoutrement.

Lauren Lopez does a funny turn as an aristocratic lady mocking the advances of a suitor. The baseness and ludicrous mores of the upper crust in Napoleon’s reign is brought to glaring light. She seduces a guest with the prospect of canapés and biscuits. Ms. Lopez is one of the founding members of Starkid Theater Company and true to her bio, she prances about the stage in a sylph-like manner that is seductive and endearing.

     
 Lauren Lopez, Blake Russell dance in "War and Peace: A Dance Theater Short" at Viaduct Theatre, adapted and choreographed by Jim Manganello Luke Couzens and Dustin Valenta in "War and Peace: A Dance Theater Short" at Viaduct Theatre, adapted and choreographed by Jim Manganello
"War and Peace: A Dance Theater Short" at Viaduct Theatre, adapted and choreographed by Jim Manganello "War and Peace: A Dance Theater Short" at Viaduct Theatre, adapted and choreographed by Jim Manganello

Blake Russell plays a patriotic young man off to war. This segment is a poignant sketch of how a family is affected by war. The youth are drawn in by an atavistic need for battle-the territorial imperative. The result is the same no matter the era when war takes its toll. Russell imparts the disillusionment and sadness of a generation whether it be 1812 or modern times.

Dustin Valenta of Redmoon among others has an impish appeal as the prologue narrator and others in the production. There is a mischievous twinkle in eye that bodes gleeful mayhem to come.

"War and Peace: A Dance Theater Short" at Viaduct Theatre, adapted and choreographed by Jim ManganelloRounding out this cast is Luke Couzens as the Russian Captain and others. He stands out in the opening combat segment after he is stabbed by Dustin Valenta‘s character. The action represents 1812 but his screaming, "You fucking stabbed me! No I’m not alright!" brings the action to present day. He is touching and funny with a young man lost appeal.

War and Peace: A Dance Theater Short is minimalist with the props, but when they are used it is for maximum impact. A hidden fan produces a funny moment and the gauze/linen draping is a wonderful representation for the frozen tundra of Russia. Look out for the table in all of its incarnations and you may reconsider your relationship with pasta after one segment.

In all, I hope that there will be more collaboration of these talented actors, dancers, puppeteers, and acrobats. They work well together and their respect for the individual craft as well as the collective has produced something wonderful. This is a short run so get out this weekend to see War and Peace: A Dance Theater Short. The Viaduct is a great space. It is fun and artistic without airs of pretentiousness. It is literally located under a viaduct at 3111 N. Western Ave. There is a laid back lobby bar where you can chill before the performance. Go see it!

  
  
Rating: ★★★½
     
     

The Atom Bomb scene in "War and Peace: A Dance Theater Short" at Viaduct Theatre, adapted and choreographed by Jim Manganello

 

     
     

Continue reading

Review: Working (Broadway in Chicago)

  
  

Now extended through June 5th!

        

Talented Chicago cast gets the job done!

  
  

Michael Mahler, E. Faye Butler, Gabriel Ruiz, Emjoy Gavino, Gene Weygandt, Barbara Robertson in Broadway in Chicago's 'Working'

  
Broadway in Chicago presents
  
Working
   
From the book by Studs Terkel
Adapted by
Stephen Schwartz and Nina Faso
Directed by
Gordon Greenburg
at
Broadway Playhouse, 175 E. Chestnut (map)
through June 5  |   tickets: $67-$77   |   more info

Reviewed by Katy Walsh 

‘Everybody should have something to point to!’ At the end of a career, job, or just day, there is satisfaction in pointing to something well-constructed… building, memo, burger… to say ‘I did that!‘ Steel beam to corner office to cubicle, one building houses millions of work tales. Broadway in Chicago presents Working a musical. In 1974, Pulitzer Prize- winning author Studs Terkel published a collection of interviews in his Michael Mahler - Chicago 'Working'book entitled “Working: People Talk About What They Do All Day and How They Feel About What They Do.” In 1977, Stephen Schwartz and Nina Faso adapted the book into a musical about the working class. In the current production, both skilled director Gordon Greenburg, and additional songs, have been added to the resume. ‘Working 2.0 brings timeless employees’ woes into a new age. Working is the ordinary dreams of ordinary people sung by an extraordinary Chicago cast!

The show is cued with a behind-the-curtain glimpse at staged theatre. An unseen person calls out directions in a countdown to the start. A bi-level backdrop showcases four dressing rooms where actors-playing-actors-playing-workers are busy prepping. The intriguing set by Beowulf Boritt has a strong industrial framework influence. The beams work double-time to establish a construction feel as an ironworker kicks-off the interview series. Later, the metal structure is the screen for visual projections by Aaron Rhyne. Designer Rhyne adds magnificent depth to the stories with authentic location and people imagery. Studs Terkel haunts the stage from beginning to end. In the opening scene, his voice is heard as several reel to reel recorders play his historic interviews tapes. At the finale, projections of the working people series ends with his facial profile. In between the Studs, a hard-working ensemble of six dress and undress…sometimes right on stage… to tell 26 different stories in 100 minutes.

The marathon of memories is well-paced, with each character’s story transitioning into another’s. Sometimes, it’s natural… construction guy to executive to assistant. Sometimes, it’s just a little forced… retired to fireman or factory worker to mason or trucker to call center tech. Regardless, the stitching together adds to a rhythmic flow for the always-dynamic and ever-changing cast. There are lots of moments to point to with this talented 6 doing 26 parts, but here are some favorites: E. Faye Butler transforms effortlessly from humble housewife to vivacious hooker to amusing cleaning lady. Totally diva-licious, Butler belts out songs like an entire gospel choir squeezed into one uniform. Gabriel Ruiz - Chicago 'Working'Emjoy Gavino goes from sassy flight attendant to poignant millworker with an unforgettable solo. Despite a crackling microphone, Barbara Robertson is delightful and slightly disturbing as an old-school teacher. Then, as an amicable and career content waitress, Robertson serves up an impressive singing number complete with a side of splits. Gabriel Ruiz delivers burgers with playful energy, then later sings sweetly as a caregiver doing a job nobody wants. Michael Mahler plays it ruggedly funny as seasoned trucker then naively hilarious as a newbie student. Gene Weygandt bookends the show as the cocky ironworker bragging about heights and confessing his shortcomings in a powerfully nostalgic ‘Fathers and Sons.’

WORKING: a musical employs a talented Chicago cast! No matter what your current job status, this hard-working cast will entertainingly sing to you a familiar tune. It’s realistic, relatable, regularity life put to music. I’m pointing at Working as an enjoyable after-work happy hour.

  
  
Rating: ★★★★
  
  
Barbara Robertson - Chicago 'Working' Gene Weygandt - Chicago 'Working' E. Faye Bulter - Chicago 'Working'
Gabriel Ruiz - Chicago 'Working' Emjoy Gavino - Chicago 'Working' Michael Mahler - Chicago 'Working'

Working continues through June 5th, with performances Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thursday, Sundays at 7:30pm, Fridays, Saturdays at 8pm, and Wednesdays, Saturdays, Sundays at 2pm.  The Broadway Playhouse is located on 175 E. Chestnut in downtown Chicago (behind Watertower Place). Ticket prices are $67 to $77, and can be purchased online HERE. Running Time: 100 minutes with no intermission.

Extra Credit:

Continue reading

Sanity Break: Bette Midler sings ‘Otto Titsling’. Hilarious!

Bette Midler sings Otto Titsling on Johnny Carson

 

 

You gotta love Bette Midler – this is hilarious!

  
  

Gilbert and Sullivan spoof: A Modern US President. (Fun!!)

For all the musical theater fans out there (plus political junkies), especially Gilbert & Sullivan fans, here’s a political spoof just for you:

 

YouTube Obama: A Modern U.S. President

Here’s a hilarious parody of Gilbert and Sullivan’s “Major General’s Song”, from Pirates of PenzanceThis video is directed by and starring Ron Butler as the President Obama.  Pretty fun, right?  And Michelle’s brief cameo is a riot.

     
     

Continue reading

Final Eclipse Theatre interview: A Memory of Two Mondays

a memory of two mondays - eclipse theatre - banner

Arthur Miller and the Meaning of Work

 

by Paige Listerud

Our last video interview with Eclipse Theatre cast members examines their critically acclaimed production of Arthur Miller’s A Memory of Two Mondays (our review ★★★). Eclipse has had a superlative season with each successive showing of rarely produced Arthur Miller works. Completing their season, A Memory of Two Mondays won the hearts of many in the Chicago theater community, opening in time for Labor Day. Set in an auto parts warehouse, Miller’s impressionistic one-act cuts to the heart of our dull dissatisfaction with the day-to-day grind, critically exacerbated by worse economic times. How we think about work and our own personal worth strikes to the very core of daily experience of American life.

Joining us is Brandon Ruiter, playing Bert, the young and hopeful lead of the play and Kevin Scott, playing the beleaguered warehouse manager, Raymond. Kevin Scott doubles as Managing Director for Eclipse and intimately knows how the economic stresses of our Great Recession correspond with Miller’s themes. There’s no getting away from our current hard times. But there’s also no getting away from the American Dream, the idea of America against which we measure our individual worth and our hopes for the employment that will help us to reach our dreams.

A Memory of Two Mondays closes October 17 and the last event in their Playwright Scholar series on Arthur Miller happens this Saturday, October 2 (open to the public for a small donation). Enjoy the video and go see the show. Few American playwrights look as plainly and unflinchingly at American life as Miller does. Without adornment or exaggeration, it is enough for him just to go to the heart of the country. A Memory of Two Mondays is his statue in the park for the ordinary working Joe.

REVIEW: The Magic Parlour (House Theatre of Chicago)

 

A Perfect Evening of Illusion and Laughter

 

 House Theatre Magic Parlour Dennis Watkins

   
The House Theatre of Chicago presents
   
The Magic Parlour
  
Featuring Dennis Watkins
at
Chopin Theatre, 1543 West Division (map)
through December 17  |  tickets: $10-$25  |  more info

Reviewed by Allegra Gallian

On Friday nights the basement of the Chopin Theatre is transformed into a space full of wonder, enchantment and intrigue. Beginning at 10:30 p.m. Dennis Watkins takes the stage for The Magic Parlour, a weekly, late-night magic show.

The basement space feels more like someone’s living room than a theatre venue. Around the stage are various rugs overlapping one another as well as comfy couches, chairs and tables. It’s a very intimate setting, creating a warm and inviting backdrop. As the crowd begins to fill in, the buzz runs throughout. Audience members range from children to adults and everyone is excited for the magical show they’re about to see.

The moment Watkins’ steps on the stage, it’s clear that he’s a character. He’s immediately charming and personable, warming the audience up with a clever comedic trick. It’s evident that Watkins’s is a talented performer and magician as he makes a torn up dollar bill reappear in a most unusual fashion.

Watkins’ reveals that he comes from a family of magicians as he bonds with the audience over life stories. His specialty is sleight of hand and the tricks he performs under this category are both crowd-House Theatre Magic Parlour posterpleasing and simply amazing. He’s incredibly talented at his craft, and there’s never any indication of how tricks are done or how they work. Nor is there any wish to know because the magic is too wonderful to be ruined.

Many of Watkins’ tricks involve audience participation, which not only adds another layer of entertainment, but it also furthers his connection and trust level with the audience. The interactive aspect is fun for both those involved and those watching the participation. Watkins does a great job of making his volunteers feel comfortable up on stage with him, easing any tension with jokes and humor. Crowd favorites include mind reading numbers, card tricks and tricks with money.

Watkins proves to be not only a magician but a comedian as well. In between and during tricks, he keeps the crowd doubled over with laughter and he recites joke after joke. During the hour-long show, I don’t think more than five minutes went by without something hilarious occurring. Watkins fills the entire space with his charming presence and personality. The hour flew by and I found myself wishing there was an encore performance.

Because he’s so talented, Watkins’ doesn’t need to employ a lot of fuss in order to wow the crowd. There aren’t major special effects or smoke and mirrors. It’s simply him on stage delivering his talent simply and wonderfully.  Come enjoy 60-minutes of pure magic and laughter!

   
   
Rating: ★★★★
  
  

The Magic Parlour plays at the Chopin Theatre, 1543 West Division, through December 17 on Friday nights at 10:30 pm. Tickets are $25 for adults, $10 for students and can be purchased at the Chopin Theatre’s Web site.