REVIEW: Those Sensations Soulful 60s (Black Ensemble)

 

Heart and Sensation Soul

 

(from left): David Simmons, Byron Willis, Kenny Davis, Theo Huff, RaShawn Thompson - photo by Ken Simmons

   
Black Ensemble Theater presents
   
Those Sensational Soulful 60’s
   
Imagined and Directed by Jackie Taylor
at Kennedy King College, 740 W. 63rd (map)
through September 26th  |  tickets: $25-$40  |  more info

Reviewed by K.D. Hopkins

Take a ride back in time with me. Sit in front of your grandmother’s television or at the kitchen table with the radio tuned to WVON circa 1966 and let the music take over. Those Sensational Soulful 60’s is a gorgeously produced time capsule of the music of many lifetimes. Whether you picked up music from the Ed Sullivan Show on Sundays or listened to the far end side of the radio dial, this show is a delightful and emotional ride.

Chic Rogers in "Those Sensational Soulful ‘60s" - Photo by Ken Simmons Black Ensemble Theater is known for great musical productions with virtuosity in the singing and a polished house orchestra. The space at Kennedy King College provided the perfect setting for this glittering tribute to the soul revues that used to travel the country in theaters like the Apollo and Chicago’s own Regal. A shimmering cyc wall of tinsel and stars hangs behind the bandstand and two simple platforms sat on either side of the stage. The nine singers for this production blasted onto the stage in beautifully tailored costumes and wigs that spoke to the times of the music. All members of the ensemble cast possess powerhouse voices that sometimes overshadow the people to which they pay tribute.

Imitation of singers is a tricky thing. It can come off as performing at your aunt’s barbeque at mother’s request. Thank goodness that is not the case in this revue. Each of the singers has an impressive resume in musicals and as professional singers. The range is from gospel to current R&B with an impressive pedigree in soul and jazz for each singer.

The show is a soul lover’s delight of superstars doing their greatest hits with just enough biographical information added. The narration never becomes preachy or indulgent but rather serves to add emotional weight to the music. From the first note of Sam Cooke’s ‘Change is Gonna Come’, I felt a swell in my heart and a wave of nostalgia. Cooke came out of the church on the West Side and his funeral was held on the South Side to a crowd of thousands of grieving fans. It was a story told around the living room while I was being seen and not heard as a child.

Most of the music comes from the Motown and Atlantic labels from which other than Stax and Mercury produced the greatest amount of Black entertainment back in the day. There are notable exceptions in the revue that raised the questions ‘what is Soul music’ and ‘who sings it?’ This made for some amusing banter and was answered by a smashing rendition of Frank Sinatra’s ‘That’s Life’ sung by Rashawn Thompson. It was followed by a virtuoso ‘Mack the Knife’ by Marilyn Grimes. Ms. Grimes has played Ella Fitzgerald in another BET production. She does mighty justice to the live recording where Ms. Fitzgerald imitates her friend Lois Armstrong and banters with the band over mangling the words with perfect improvisation and scat singing.

Chick Rogers does a spot on imitation of Patti LaBelle’s over the top stage persona with ‘Somewhere Over the Rainbow’. That song can be a minefield of maudlin as witnessed on how many amateur competitions. A comic moment was made of Ms. Roger’s diminutive size as she took on Aretha Franklin’s ‘Respect’. It is quite possible that every cell of Chick Rogers is music. She took me back to a summer in Oakland with a cousin making up a dance to that very song.

Stephanie Crystal sang a perfect ‘Release Me’ by Esther Phillips that was not in huge rotation on regular radio and also crossed over into the more country style of music. Ms. Phillips had a very distinctive nasal timbre that is perfectly nuanced by Ms. Crystal. She also does a stellar job of Nancy Wilson’s ‘How Glad I Am’.

Theo Huff sings in BET's "Those Sensational Soulful ‘60s" - Photo by Ken Simmons Ensemble member Melanie McCullough is quite funny as she takes on the most interesting wig choices and does a darkly funny Tina Turner. Fellow cast mate David Simmons glowers in the background as Ike Turner on ‘Proud Mary’. She does the perfect wig-shaking dance in stilettos and then quavers an ‘okay Ike’ as she scampers off of the stage. Mr. Simmons along with Kevin Roston, Theo Huff, and Rashawn Thompson pay perfect tribute to the male groups of Motown. They recreate the cool choreography of The Tempations, The Four Tops, and Smokey Robinson and The Miracles as well as the smooth perfect harmonies of each group. It was like watching a grainy black and white television rerun that comes to life in color.

It was interesting to hear Ms. McCullough sing as Diana Ross. Her voice is way more soulful and powerful than Ms. Ross’ thin voice. She did a great visual imitation but would blow Miss Ross out of the water in a one-on-one. I cannot recall any live versions of ‘Sittin’ on the Dock of the Bay’ by Otis Redding as he tragically died three days after recording the song. The version in this show gave me a wistful reminder of what a great talent died in that plane crash now decades ago.

You will no doubt recognize a favorite song; remember dance steps, or Saturday’s watching Soul Train or American Bandstand. A talented cast and band lovingly and respectfully recall this music. The costumes of the era are perfect and bring to mind that those ladies just sang the music. They didn’t need to gyrate in choreographed histrionics –except for Tina Turner that is her trademark. I think it was because the costumes weigh so much with all the rhinestones and glitter not to mention the weight of the wigs. This was an era of great taste and classic costumes. There were no peek-a-boo moments while climbing out of taxis.

It was an interesting ride back from 63rd and Halsted. I remember the landscape as full and vibrant with the record shops that would play a 45 for you before you purchased it. There seemed to be the sounds of soul music everywhere. Now it is a desolate and blighted landscape from seen from the windows of the Green Line El. I could still hear the music playing in my head with a new view that is haunting all on its own.

   
   
Rating: ★★★★
   
  

Those Sensational Soulful 60’s runs Fridays and Saturday at 8:00PM and Sundays at 3:00PM through September 26th only. It is a short run but worth the travel. For more information check www.blackensembletheater.org  Be aware that travel directions to Kennedy King College are incorrect on Google CTA Direction. Take the Green Line to 63rd and Halsted not the Red Line to 69th and the Ryan. There is a giant gravel pit where the old college was if you follow the old directions and apparently only one cab on that long empty stretch which we were lucky enough to catch!

   
     

Reprising the talented ensemble cast of Those Sensational Soulful ‘60s will be Stephanie Crystal, Kenny Davis, Marylin Grimes, Theo Huff, Melanie McCullough, Delvin Roston, Jr., Chick Rodgers, Davis Simmons and Rashawn Thompson. The band, led by Music Director Robert Reddrick, includes Mark Moultrip on piano, Herb Walkter on guitar, Tracy Anita Baker on bass, Bill McFarland on trombone, Hank Ford on saxophone, and Paul Howard on trumpet.

REVIEW: Dreamgirls (Broadway in Chicago)

Talented Cast Shimmers and Shines

 

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Broadway in Chicago presents:

 

Dreamgirls

 

Book and Lyrics by Tom Eyen
Music by
Henry Krieger
Directed and Choreographed by
Robert Longbottom
thru January 31st (ticket info)

By Keith Ecker 

dreamgirls4 If there is one thing the stage production of Dreamgirls will always have over the film, it is the sequins. Video cannot convey the absolute beauty of the costumes that adorn the actresses, costumes that appear just as glittery as Bob Mackie’s most flamboyant creations. William Ivey Long gets a hat tip for costume design, which comes as no surprise considering the man is a veteran of Broadway. He’s won five of the 11 Tony nominations he’s received and is an inductee in the Theatre Hall of Fame, a hall that I am sure is just as glamorous as Long’s aesthetic sensibility.

Of course, Dreamgirls is more than just elegant gowns and flared pants—it’s about the singing. And this show, produced by Broadway in Chicago at the Cadillac Palace Theatre, definitely delivers. These actors can wail. From guttural growls that convey the rawest of emotions to controlled, sustained tones that capture the world-weariness of the characters, the Dreamgirls cast sports an impressive set of pipes.

The play is a fictional tale based on the true tribulations of such early R&B acts as the Supremes. At the opening, three female singers from Chicago, known as the Dreamettes, hope to get their big break at the legendary Apollo Theater in New York. Effie (Moya Angela) is the full-figured lead with an Aretha Franklin-like strength to her voice. Her friends Deena (Syesha Mercado) and Lorrell (Adrienne Warren) serve as her back up. Effie’s brother C.C. (Trevon Davis) writes all their music. The group doesn’t make the cut at the Apollo, but thanks to their newfound manager, Curtis (Chaz Lamar Shepherd), they get a 10-week touring gig backing up-and-comer Jimmy Early (Chester Gregory). Effie doesn’t take well to the idea of being second banana, but she goes along for the good of the group.

Curtis eventually spins the Dreamettes off into their own act, now known as the “Dreams”. Despite having a romantic relationship with Effie, he bumps her from lead for the more camera-friendly Deena, who Curtis then begins courting. Becoming increasingly agitated and unpredictable, Effie is replaced, leading to the musical’s famous torch song “And I’m Telling You I’m Not Going.”

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The Dreams wrestle with fame, Curtis continues his greed-induced destructive path and Effie must find herself after being forced to realize she is not the center of the universe. And did I mention the sequins?

Angela as Effie is brilliant. Her rendition of “And I’m Telling You I’m Not Going” is a showstopper. As she staggers, sways and belts out the tune during the complete and utter breakdown of Effie’s ego, your gut is as wrenched as your ears are pleasured.

Equally impressive is Gregory’s portrayal of Jimmy Early. The role is incredibly demanding, requiring superb vocal control, an impeccable sense of soul, physical endurance and strength and precise comedic timing. Gregory nails it, juggling all these attributes at once. A perfect example of this display of multi-talent takes place during the number “The Rap,” where Jimmy throws off all restraints and reclaims his sense of soul. For those unfamiliar with the play, I’d rather not spoil the scene, but I will say there’s ample dipping.

The set design is minimal, providing an open space for lots of jumping, jiving and sashaying. Most of the set is composed of five very tall video screens, which are used to full effect. At one point, a camera cleverly positioned above the stage displays a Busby Berkeley-style chorus number as if the performers were a cluster of synchronized swimmers.

There were a few sound issues. During the first act, mics were set too low and sometimes cut out. There was also a technical gaff during the reprise of “Cadillac Car.” But such issues aren’t likely to recur.

Beautiful both visually and aurally, Broadway in Chicago’s production of Dreamgirls is sure to please both the casual theatergoer and the diehard musical fanatic.

Rating: ★★★★

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