REVIEW: Grey Gardens (Jedlicka Performing Arts)

     
     

Technical problems, tame performances mar Jedlicka production

     
     

Mary Nigohosian and Mary Hobein

  
Jedlicka Performing Arts Center presents
       
Grey Gardens
   
Book by Doug Wright
Music by
Scott Frankel, Lyrics by Michael Korie
Directed by
Michael A. Kott
at
Jedlicka Performing Arts Center, Cicero (map)
through Jan 29  |  tickets: $17  |  more info

Reviewed by Oliver Sava

When documentary filmmakers Albert and David Maysles ventured into Grey Gardens, they could never have expected the kind of cultural effect two reclusive relatives of a former first lady could have on America. “Grey Gardens” became a cult classic, spawning a Broadway musical, an HBO original film (starring Drew Barrymore and Jessica Lange), and thousands of revolutionary Halloween costumes (including some for babies). The home of “Big Edie” and “Little Edie” Bouvier Beale, aunt and cousin of Jackie Kennedy Onassis, Grey Gardens was once a regal Hampton estate but deteriorated after years of neglect from its two inhabitants. Frankel, Korie, and Wright’s musical Grey Gardens examines the majestic past and tragic fate of the Beales and their dilapidated cage of memories, setting the first act in 1941, the second in 1973, and having one actress play a different Edie in each. Mary Nigohosian fills the dual role in Jedlicka’s production, and is undeniably the best part of a show plagued with technical problems and otherwise uninspiring performances.

Mary NigohosianThe beauty of Grey Gardens is the emotional intensity of the music in relation to these eccentric yet incredibly real characters. The tragedy lies in the truth behind the Edies’ circumstances, and Jedlicka’s production simply lacks honesty. In the first act, much of the music is light and whimsical fare in the vein of Porter or Berlin, so the actors have to use the dialogue to make the gravity of their situation as real as possible. Unfortunately, many of these early scenes are underscored, and due to space constrictions in the theater the pit is in a different room. The actors have to rush through most of their dialogue to keep up with the orchestra, which plays beautifully, but needs to give the actors a little more room to breathe. A lot exposition is lost in these scenes because the actors have trouble keeping up with and staying louder than the orchestra, and as a result it’s hard to get a feel for who these people are beneath the broadly drawn caricatures.

Nigohosian shines in the first act, where she is able to play the more traditional diva role as Edith Sr. in 1931, a glamorous attention whore of a housewife. With her pianist and gay best friend George Gould Strong (Austin Cook), Edith plans her set list for Little Edie’s (Jill Sesso) engagement party. Meanwhile, Edie is concerned with only one thing: getting out of Grey Gardens once she marries Joseph Patrick Kennedy, Jr. (Charles Lane Cowen). As they wait for Mr. Beale to arrive back from the city, Edith’s father Major Bouvier (Gary Saipe) harps on his daughter for her bohemian behavior, which Frankel and Korie capture in hilariously offensive musical numbers. Bits like Edith’s “itty bitty geisha” and full-on songs like “Hominy Grits” are written to be exaggerated, yet Nigohosion is too restrained during these scenes. It feels like the entire ensemble is holding back; the director hasn’t brought the actors to a point where they’ve found the truth of their characters.

When Edith performs her horrific Mamie routine, her black butler Brooks (Steven Perkins) barely reacts. When Gould tells Edie he is leaving he doesn’t look sad or heartbroken, he just looks bored. Moments like these help flesh out character relationships, and are glossed over too much in this production. It doesn’t help that most of the time the actors are facing out to the audience despite speaking to each other, which is fine during singing, but not so much during dialogue. Eye contact helps. Another problem is maintaining dialects, and as difficult as it is to sing in dialect, it’s essential to keeping the illusion of the characters real in this play. This ensemble struggles with the difficult New England accents, which is major problem in act two, when the characters become defined by their shrill, nasal voices.

In the second act, so much of Little Edie’s character comes through her hyper-nasal voice, and the act two musical numbers require an amazing amount of technique to maintain her vocals. In the opening of act two, “The Revolutionary Costume for Today,” Nogohosian has so much extra business with her costume that she isn’t able to focus on the incredibly difficult music, and despite a strong start the number fizzles at the end. Act two crawls toward its climax, and Edie’s concluding solos are affected by the difficulties with the pit. Tempo changes are jarring, and as Nogohosian tries to match the speed of the orchestra she devotes less to the actual emotion of the music. There are moments of “Another Winter In A Summer Town” (one of my favorite ballads of the last decade) when Nogohosian clicks with the orchestra and there is a glimpse of the Edie-that-could-be, but they shouldn’t be coming this late in the show.

In the end of the documentary (and thus the play) the Grey Gardens estate was a complete wreck, its two residents living in piles of trash, cats, and corn. Jedlicka’s production of Grey Gardens is messy in all the wrong ways, with the actors giving bland performances that don’t capture the desperation of these spectacular women. The transformation of Grey Gardens from act one to act two is the perfect physical representation of what is wrong with this show. Selective piles of rubbage are placed on Edith’s bed and the refrigerator, yet the rest of the space remains completely clean. If we are supposed to believe these women live in a garbage dump flea bag of a home, it has to look that way. Everything needs to be taken to the next level – the acting, the set, the technical design – if the tragedy of the Beales is to be believed.

  
  

Rating: ★½

     
     

Grey Gardens continues at Jedlicka Performing Arts Center, Cicero (map) through January 29.  Tickets are $17.  More info.

Grey Gardens brochure picture

Artists

GREY GARDENS stars Mary Nigohosian of Batavia, Mary Hobein of Woodridge, Tessa Newman of Naperville, Gary Saipe of Libertyville, Katelyn Smith of Broadview and Austin Cook, Charles Lane Cowen, Jill Sesso and Steven Perkins of Chicago.

GREY GARDENS is directed by Micheal A. Kott with music direction by Adam Gustafson, Choreography by Sarah Bright, Scenic Design by Michael Nedza, Costume Design by Jennifer Ring and Lighting Design by Dante Orfei. Music direction is by Adam Gustafson who will lead an 8-piece live orchestra.

  
  

About Face announces 2010-2011 Season, future plans

Artistic Director Bonnie Metzgar Announces 15th Season

 

about face logo

Including Three World Premieres, New Artistic Associates, and XYZ Festival

Celebrating the 15th anniversary of About Face Theatre, it looks like Artistic Director Bonnie Metzgar and new Executive Director Jason Held have upped the ante for the start of their next 15 years.  Included in the upcoming season is Float by Patricia Kane, Pony by Sally Oswald and The Homosexuals by Phillip Dawkins, are their second annual XYZ Festival of New Works

 

 

 

 

About Face is excited to roll out our 15th anniversary with a season that examines individuals at the precipice of change,” says Bonnie Metzgar. “As our organization and society at large both make pivotal choices, this season looks at the risks and exhilarating possibilities available to us in periods of transformation.

 

October 2010

XYZ Festival

The XYZ Festival will introduce Chicago audiences to the most innovative LGBTQA artists and artworks at all stages of development. Presented over the month of October, projects will include a workshop production of TINY ROOMS by Carson Kreitzer, and new works from AFT About Face Artistic Associates Tanya Saracho and Patrick Andrews, as well as a performance lounge series featuring AFT Artistic Associate Dan Stermer’s performance art/dance trio Double DJ, curated by AFT Marketing Director Jane Beachy. From the hundreds of scripts received for the XYZ Readings Series, four new plays by acclaimed emerging playwrights round out the festival.

XYZ Logo

November 11 – December 12

Float

FLOAT, a new play written by About Face Theatre (AFT) Artistic Associate Patricia Kane and directed by 500 Clown founder Leslie Danzig with dramaturgy by Jessica Thebus. The all-female cast includes Wendy Robie, Adrianne Cury, Peggy Roeder, Rengin Altay and AFT Artistic Associate Amy Matheny. FLOAT will run from November 11 – December 12 at Theater Wit (1229 West Belmont).

 

April-May 2011 

Pony

 

In April/May, About Face Theatre will present the world premiere of PONY by Sally Oswald, a play inspired by Georg Büchner, at the Chopin Theatre. Directed by Bonnie Metzgar, PONY will be featured as part of The Woyzeck Project, a city-wide festival hosted by About Face Theatre, The Hypocrites, and Collaboraction in which artists around the city will produce hybrid works inspired by the classic anti-war play. Set near the location of the famous murder scene in Woyzeck, PONY is a tale of shifting gender roles and the dangers of obsessive love.

 

June/July 2011

The Homosexuals

About Face Theatre will conclude its season in June/July with The Homosexuals by Chicago playwright Phillip Dawkins, starring Patrick Andrews at Victory Gardens Studio. The Homosexuals presents the interwoven lives, friendships, and relationships among six homosexual men over six years. Set at present time in a Midwestern city, Dawkins’ comedic and heartbreaking work examines the fears, doubts, and hope among the gay community in a 21st century perspective on the queer classic, The Boys in the Band.

About Face Theatre’s 15th Anniversary Season exemplifies how far the LGBTQ community has come from being defined by one issue to being seen as complex. In our 15 years, AFT has given voice to that changing dialogue around issues facing the queer community. As we move forward, we understand the need to bring the conversation around sexuality and gender to all people,” says Executive Director Jason Held.

 

 

 

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REVIEW: I Am My Own Wife (Boho Theatre)

Peter Robel shows grace & poise in this exquisite one-man show

my-own-wife

Boho Theatre presents:

I Am My Own Wife

 

By Doug Wright
Co-Directed by Peter Marston Sullivan and Stephen M Genovese
Thru February 13th (ticket info)

Review by Aggie Hewitt

Watching a one-man show is as terrifying as watching Philippe Petit walk on a high wire between the Twin Towers. At any moment he can come crashing down, flailing and unstoppable, leaving the audience with a bloody mess that they never asked for. When someone chooses that kind of undertaking, they make an oath to their audience. They say, “I promise not to fall. I promise you I can do this.” A one-man show is dangerous. Not in an artsy way, where it’s so provocative that it’s very existence is dangerous, it’s dangerous because it can be so embarrassing. The actor has nothing to hide behind. Even with a spectacularly written show, like Doug Wright’s I Am My Own Wife is, no amount of great writing is going to stop an actor from becoming Tobias Funke if he derails mid-performance. Sometimes people go to the theater for a grown-up version of a rollercoaster: with every rise and fall of the actors ability one can feel their body tense with the fear of witnessing something truly shameful. That doesn’t happen at Boho Theatre, where Peter Robel, playing all the 35+ characters makes it all the way across the high wire, with such grace and poise that you will forget to be scared at all.

wife I Am My Own Wife was originally created by Doug Wright, with developmental help from Moises Kaufman and the actor Jefferson Mays. It explores the life of German transvestite Charlotte von Mahlsdorf as she survived both the Nazi and Communist regimes, and Doug Wright’s obsession with her. The play has that lovely, sad bookishness of a Moises Kaufman play, and his presence is felt in the narrative. The scenes taken from real transcripts of interviews between Doug and Charlotte have a documentary feel to them, a feeling that is almost academic. It’s Doug Wright’s love of learning about Charlotte, and not his love of Charlotte herself that makes this play an intellectual treat. The more you learn about Charlotte, the more you want to fact check yourself, to learn everything possible about this enigmatic character. When the lights come up at the end of the second act, the only thing you know for sure about Charlotte is that you want to learn more about her. What better way for a biographical piece to end?

All of this great writing would fall flat however if it were not being presented by a great actor. With something as audacious as a one-man show, the last thing you’d expect an actor to do is to take back seat to the story, but that is exactly what Peter Robel does in this performance. During the course of what must be an exhausting show, Peter Robel never once stops to let you see him working. His acting textbook pure; it’s as if Uta Hagen came down from heaven and instructed him in great storytelling. Since I assume she didn’t, a lot of credit probably goes to co-directors Peter Marston Sullivan and Stephen M Genovese.

The play works so well because even though Peter Robel’s performance is as amazing as watching a marathon runner pushing himself past normal human capacity for endurance, each choice that is made ultimately serves the play. The reason that this one-man show isn’t embarrassing is that it’s a great story, told by smart people. Every mind that went into this production, from Doug Wright to John Zuiker, who designed lovely and elegant set was focused on telling a simply and well-crafted story. This is a production that proves that when integrity is in the intentions, wonderful theater can be achieved.

Rating: ★★★★

San Diego mayor to join cast of “The Laramie Project”

San Diego’s Republican mayor Jerry Sanders, who endorsed marriage equality in support of his lesbian daughter in 2007, will join the cast of the San Diego reading of The Laramie Project: 10 Years Later, to be performed October 12 at the La Jolla Playhouse.

JERRY SANDERS SAN DIEGO X390 (GETTY) | ADVOCATE.COM

Per La Jolla Playhouse, “the reading will be helmed by acclaimed director Darko Tresnjak. In addition to the mayor, the cast includes Doug Wright, Pulitzer Prize-winner and adapter/director of the Playhouse’s upcoming production of Creditors, San Diego Rep Artistic Director Sam Woodhouse, as well as the acclaimed actors Mare Winningham, Robert Foxworth, Amanda Naughton, James Newcomb, Stark Sands, T. Ryder Smith, James Sutorius, among many others.”

More hereby Julie Bolcer

Northlight Theatre announces 2008/09 season

 

Northlight  Theatre 2008/09 Season

 

Doctor Jekyll & Mr. Hyde

Adapted by Jeffrey Hatcher

Based on the novella by Robert Louis Stevenson

Directed by Jessica Thebus

What happened the night that Henry Jekyll died? Against the backdrop of Victorian London, the respected doctor has begun to display alarmingly erratic behavior toward his friends.  At the wsame time, a mysterious figure haunts the city’s streets under the cloak of the London fog.  This fiendishly clever and theatrically innovative new adaptation of Robert Louis Stevenson’s classic tale is a smart, psychological thriller that delights in revealing the many faces of Edward Hyde.

September 17 – October 26, 2008

 

 

Grey Gardens

Book by Doug Wright, music by Scott Frankel, lyrics by Michael Korie

Directed by BJ Jones

Musical direction by Doug Peck

Rub elbows with Edith Bouvier Beale and her daughter “Little Edie,” – Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis’ most scandalous relatives!  Once the highest of high society, the two have become East Hampton’s most notorious recluses, living in a dilapidated 28-room mansion with 51 cats for company.  Set in two eras – 1941 when the celebrated estate was the picture of wealth and sophistication, and 1973 after it had been reduced to squalor – Grey Gardens is a brilliant and heartbreaking look at two indomitable women.

November 12 – December 21, 2008

 

 

Po Boy Tango

By Kenneth Lin

Translated by Martin Crimp

Directed by Chay Yew

A celebration of the human spirit and the joy of cooking, Po Boy Tango tells the story of Richie Po, a Chinese immigrant who turns to his estranged friend Gloria to help him recreate his mother’s “Great Banquet.”  Despite the challenges of shark fin soup, duck po boy sandwiches and underlying cultural tensions, Richie and Gloria find common ground through their shared humor and the blending of traditional Taiwanese cuisine and African American “Soul Food.”  Helped by lessons from Po Moma’s television cooking show, the two discover a deeper understanding of food, culture and the nature of friendship.

January 7   February 15, 2009

 

 

Mauritius

By Theresa Rebeck

Directed by Dexter Bullard

The stakes are high when half-sisters inherit a book of rare stamps that may include the “crown jewel” of the stamp-collection world.  The battle for possession takes a dangerous turn when three rival collectors enter the sisters’ world, willing to go to any lengths to stake their claim on the find.  Combining the best aspects of Hitchcock, Chandler and Mamet, “Mauritius” is a gripping blend of sharp comedy and heart-pounding drama that simmers with constant surprise.

February 25 – April 5, 2009

 

 

The Lieutenant of Inishmore

By Martin McDonagh

Directed by BJ Jones

“Wee Thomas” the cat has been killed.  What’s worse, he was the beloved pet of Padraic – a ruthless Irish hitman who considers the IRA “too soft.”  As the folks back home fight over who has to break the bad news, the violence escalates – recalling Shakespeare and Quentin Tarantino at their bloody best.  A few murders, several dismemberments and a smattering of cow mutilations later, all is finally right with the world again.  Or is it?  In this wickedly funny black comedy from the author of “The Cripple of Inishmaan”, “A Skull in Connemara” and the recent film “In Bruges”, McDonagh considers the implications of outrageous reactions to small misunderstandings.

April 29   June 7, 2009

 

For more information, call 847-673-6300, or go to www.northlight.org