REVIEW: Songs for a Future Generation (Lights Out Theatre)

Dancing to its own tune!

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Lights Out Theatre presents

Songs for a Future Generation

 

Written by Joe Tracz
Directed by Mary Rose O’Connor
At EP Theatre, 1820 S. Halsted

Thru March 13th  (more info)

By Katy Walsh

What does the future hold? The good news is dance parties! The bad news is no lobster! Lights Out Theatre Company presents Songs for a Future Generation. Set in the future, in a galaxy far, far away, Songs for a Future Generation imagines the SFAFG1continued challenges of hosting successful theme parties, searching for ‘the one’, and saving the… rock lobster. It is present day themes with science fiction twists. The party hosts are clones. The love seeker is a time traveler. The seafood advocate is an  intergalactic fugitive. Songs for a Future Generation is multiple stories unfolding during a series of dance parties. Watching the show is like being a wallflower, you are delighted by the rocking bash but uncertain how to engage in what’s happening.

The cast rockets with pure octane energy. The best moments are the choreographed (Anna Lucero) dance sequences involving the whole cast. The ensemble is perfectly in-sync in the dance. They bop with such enthusiasm, it feels like you are gawkers at the cool kids’ party rather than an audience at a play. As Marika clones, Andrea DeCamp, Hailey Wineland and Annie Lydia Litchfield do a wonderful job being unique while being in unison. Jaclyn Keough (The Kid), looking like an androgynous “It’s James Dean,” was fascinating to watch in her antics to rescue the rock lobster. Jonathan Matteson (Error) is the lovestruck time traveler bringing old school charm to a hedonistic generation. The costumes (Bradley Burgess-Donaleski) and hairstyles are a fun, sexy, hot mess.

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For any dance party to be successful, certain elements must be present. For Songs for a Future Generation, there is definitely the right music, dance and energy. The buzz killer is often straddling the party balance between “too much” and “not enough.” In the dance numbers, keeping the large cast in step together is impressive. In scenes, where the action is low and the cast is hugging the walls, the stage’s emptiness is “nobody came to my party” awkward. The script also becomes party victim to “too much” or “not enough.” Although there are multiple storylines to follow, the content is light and frothy. The plotlines are basic and predictable. The rave is definitely the boogie. Life is a collection of celebrations. Every festivity doesn’t have to be legendary. Treat Songs for a Future Generation like the eye candy at a party, he’s pretty to look at but a strong connection isn’t necessarily present. It’s a fun hour without any emotional or intellectual commitment. Sometimes, it is just about dancing!

Rating: ★★★

Running Time: One hour and twenty-five minutes (no intermission, 10 minute delayed start).

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Review: EP Theatre’s “Baal”

EP’s “Baal” Far from Ballsy

 

EP Theatre presents:

Baal
by Bertolt Brecht
co-directed by AJ Ware and Hunter Kennedy
1820 S. Halsted (map)
thru October 3rd (tickets)

reviewed by Barry Eitel

Because it is the first play written by Bertolt Brecht, arguably the most important theatre theorist of the 20th Century, Baal is a fascinating work. The sprawling drama was written in 1918, before Brecht nailed down the Epic theatre style which would become his trademark. Glimmers of Brecht’s later techniques can still be found, though, such as the use of song and direct address. EP Theatre’s current production, billed as their biggest show to date, features live music baalaccompaniment by the band The Loneliest Monk. Although the production values of this Baal can be pretty ingenious, it lacks clarity and comes across as sloppy and confusing.

There is a lot of love for Brecht’s first work right now, with not one but two full productions happening this season (TUTA is also producing the play next May). Now Baal is an interesting little play for studying the writer’s development, but Brecht’s later masterpieces totally overshadow his debut in terms of quality. I wondered why any company would select it over his later works, but I was reminded how devastating and resonant the story can be. Drawing on Romantic period themes, the play follows a young, self-destructive poet with an insatiable appetite for liquor, sex, and verse. Desensitized to the world, Baal leaves shattered hearts and lives in his wake.

Co-directors AJ Ware and Hunter Kennedy’s production is so muddled; however, the full potential impact of the play is lost. Most of the locations or spans of time are never defined. This makes the action of story and relationships of the characters hard to piece together. There’s also a diverse collection of tertiary characters that are double-cast, but these are also ill-defined. The narrative in general in jumbled and the themes, characters, and emotional effect are disordered.

EP-theater-logo Even though Baal was written before the Brechtian style became the Brechtian style, there are still opportunities to use his powerful methods. Brecht himself retooled the play in 1926 to more closely fit his tastes. I was perplexed by the fact that EP’s production seems to shy away from embracing Brechtian techniques when they can be such a fun challenge for a smaller company. The live musicians are a start, especially when they occasionally interact with the actors. But there isn’t much of an attempt to play around with the audience; it feels like we’re watching a realistic play with some poetry tossed into the dialogue.

The performances might be to blame here, many being way more moody than cynically detached. Craig Cunningham was able to encapsulate the moroseness and aloofness of Baal, along with some of the humor (like when he’s playing with a fresh corpse). Shawn Pfautsch’s Ekart, Baal’s slightly more aware best friend, refreshingly punched up the poetry of the script. However, I’m pretty sure Pfautsch and Cunningham were secretly competing for wobbliest walk and seeing who could get closest to the other. The best performance in the production, hands down, is Gus Menary as Johannes. The part is tiny, but Menary’s portrayal was disturbingly underplayed, in particular when he describes how the body of his dead sister must look after years of floating in a river.

David Beaupre’s drab set design allowed the actors to explore different levels and could be transformed into a myriad of locales. With all of the possibilities the set opened up, it feels as if the set wasn’t fully utilized by the directors. The lighting was possibly the worst lighting design I’ve ever seen, sometimes highlighting pointless sections of wall and other times not providing enough visibility to see the actors. The Loneliest Monk is a saving grace of this production, though, providing complex and haunting ambiance.

The live music along with the actors’ obvious respect for Brecht’s evocative poetry makes the production acceptable. With more attention to story and technique, though, EP’s “biggest production to date” could’ve been destructive.

Rating: ««

Review: Jackalope Theatre’s “Moonshiner”

Jackalope Theatre Sets the Right Period Mood for Moonshiner

Moonshiner

Jackalope Theatre presents

Moonshiner
by Andrew Burden Swanson
directed by Gus Menary
thru Saturday, August 29th (buy tickets)

Reviewed by Paige Listerud

Moonshiner, a world premiere play by breakout playwright Andrew Burden Swanson, has a lot going for it. Under the direction of Gus Menary, its talented cast invests its characters with all the heft and vitality needed to steer what could have been a thoroughly maudlin work toward deeper grounding in American realism. Swanson’s strengths as a young playwright demonstrate the capacity to maintain a strong dramatic arc that builds tension and suspense without sacrificing character development. But perhaps the most inspired choice by Jackalope Theatre Company in setting the play was selecting the EP Theatre space (map) for its second full-length production.

Moonshiner Everything at the EP space contributes to the production’s Prohibition Era atmosphere–from its pressed tin ceiling to the smell of wood to its molded, movie palace faces and, finally, to its lack of air conditioning. So wear light, comfortable clothing, and be ready to fan yourself like a Southern lady, because there is more than enough here to transport an audience back to rural 1930s Tennessee. Special mention goes to sound designer Justin Cyrul for creating the perfect music to sustain the mood.

Carl (Chris Chmelik) and Isaac (Jeremy Khan) are two cousins just getting by in the Depression on Carl’s clandestine rum running and Isaac’s ownership of the house that they live in together. But conflicting forces conspire to tear apart what little they have of family life.

The mercenary Mrs. Cartwright (Patti Roeder) has her eye on Isaac’s property and may think him an easy mark because of his blindness. Her niece Constance (Caroline Neff) spares nothing in warning Isaac of her aunt’s true intentions and Isaac’s blindness merely covers a deeper innate gift all his own. Meanwhile, Carl’s illegal activities meet further complications upon the revelation that the sheriff’s daughter has gone missing.

Menary does a great job enjoining his cast to keep it real. Some of the roles in Swanson’s work are stock Southern characters dangerously bordering on stereotype. So we have Forsythe (James Erico) and Gabbleman (Jim Elder) as the polite, but corrupt and menacing, sheriff’s deputies; Virgil (Wes Perry) as a bit of a Bubba, and Mrs. Cartwright as the typical, hypocritical church lady. What prevents the play from becoming trite is both the direction and the psychological pithiness and humor of Swanson’s dialogue. He shows that he can write characters that go against the predictable grain with Carl’s moonshiner boss, Dwayne (Bill Hyland), and the feisty, independent niece, Constance. The role of Isaac could have devolved into stereotype, but is spared that by an intelligent, deeply humanizing performance by Khan.

But Carl may be the masterpiece of characterization in the play and Chmelik portrays his erotic, troubled, and mercurial nature right up to its suspenseful end. Here is where all the efforts to manifest a cohesive, realist, ensemble work pay off and the entire cast and crew can take pride in their achievement. The only thing lacking over all may be in pacing. The slower lifestyle of the rural South shouldn’t be replicated in dramatic time on the stage.

With action sequences that include fights (fight choreography by Ryan Bourque) and gunfire, you’ve got a play that could very well translate to film. But I hope Swanson keeps his talent in Chicago just a little longer. I also hope Jackalope Theatre’s career is a long one, especially if it keeps producing original works like this one that are “deeply rooted in the American mythos.”

Rating: «««½