Review: Terre Haute (Black Elephant Theatre)

  
  

Two extremes create their own middle

  
  

Cole Simon as 'Harrison' in Black Elephant Theatre's 'Terre Haute' by Edmund White.

  
Black Elephant Theatre presents
  
Terre Haute
  
Written by Edmund White
Directed by Michael Rashid
at Athenaeum Theatre, 2936 N. Southport (map)
through April 10  |  tickets: $20  |  more info

Reviewed by Lawrence Bommer

What if brilliant gadfly Gore Vidal (here called “James”) and mass murdering domestic terrorist Timothy McVeigh (“Harrison”) had actually met, instead of simply corresponding with each as happened? The very speculative results are on harsh display for 90 minutes, the setting a basically bare stage that suggests the prison contact area where they might have met. It’s neutral ground between opposites that attract in this Chicago premiere of a very telling, if imaginary, encounter between American poles.

Danne W. Taylor as 'James Brevoort' in Black Elephant Theatre's 'Terre Haute' by Edmund White.71 and suffering from osteosclerosis as he hobbles on a cane with characteristic dignity, Vidal, radical politico and openly, if not happily, gay (a richly nuanced Danne W. Taylor), is drawn to his seeming nemesis (despite being repelled by all of Indiana).

(It’s much as Truman Capote was to the multiple murderer Perry Smith or straight Norman Mailer was to killer Gary Gilmore. All three great writers seemed to shadow the executions of their subjects, though, unlike vultures, their interest was in how they faced the end, not the aftermath.)

28, unrepentant, and possibly a virgin, Cole Simon’s macho McVeigh is attractive and forbidding enough to make daredevil Vidal want to kiss him or at least touch his prison-toned chest. (So it goes at least in this fictionalized treatment by Edmund White.) Showing his usual perverse sympathy with the devil, Vidal understands that the sociopathic white supremacist/survivalist was in fact avenging an equally gratuitous slaughter of scores of supposedly innocent citizens at Ruby Ridge and Waco (exactly three years before McVeigh’s 1995 bombing).

They both find common ground in their distrust of the government and the elites who own it. Vidal fears that the American republic is endangered by the American empire and the “constant warfare” by which the populace is distracted from being raped by the rich. McVeigh dreads a “New World Order” in which the U.N. will invade America and give it up to its Jewish “owners” while enslaving the “true” citizens, deprived of guns with which to fight back. For him no sacrifice is too great to thwart the coup, including losing his life to a lethal injection. He calls it a “state-assisted suicide.”

But, as Vidal tapes McVeigh’s halting confessional, it’s clear what really unites them—what Vidal calls “the American loneliness.” Though Vidal argues that life is sacred (even if he’s an unbeliever) and McVeigh dismisses the 19 children his 7,000 fertilizer bomb killed as “collateral damage,” they both agree on the alienation they feel from and for their native land. Both are veterans who distrust the U.S. military and the constant surveillance of civilian authorities. Both are nearing death: Vidal loves life enough to fear it but, like a true jihadist, McVeigh has already crossed to the dark side: The execution will only finish the journey. Most interestingly, McVeigh reminds Vidal of his first lover Bud, who was equally eager to find easy answers and immediate gratification.

     
Cole Simon as 'Harrison' in Black Elephant Theatre's 'Terre Haute' by Edmund White. Danne W. Taylor as 'James Brevoort' in Black Elephant Theatre's 'Terre Haute' by Edmund White.
Danne W. Taylor as James Brevoort and Cole Simon as Harrison in Black Elephant Theatre's 'Terre Haute' by Edmund White.  Danne W. Taylor as 'James Brevoort' in Black Elephant Theatre's 'Terre Haute' by Edmund White.

Director Michael Rashid does a fine job of using body language and the caged pacing of inmate and interviewer to reveal the intricate psychodynamics that connect and repel them. (They have a ferocious donnybrook that oddly resembles a lover’s quarrel.) When Gore finally mentions the broken bodies of the many victims, McVeigh almost sees them for the first time, far more real than any abstraction of anti-government revenge could ever be.

It’s not exactly a meeting of minds. McVeigh is too much the militia-minded thug of action to be any more than a nightmare clad in flesh. But, despite its highly imaginative pretend-encounter, Terre Haute goes far to explaining how much American extremes—Vidal’s kneejerk cynicism about American ideals and McVeigh’s lethal paranoia and self-pity—seem to deserve each other. Most of us are happy enough to live in between.

     
   
Rating: ★★★
  
  

Danne W. Taylor as James Brevoort and Cole Simon as Harrison in Black Elephant Theatre's 'Terre Haute' by Edmund White.

Terre Haute runs through April 10th, with performances Thursday-Saturday at 8pm and Sundays at 3pm.  Tickets are $20, and are available online or by calling 800-982-2787. Terre Haute runs 80-minute with no intermission.

     
     

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Closing – "No Darkness…" and "Radium Girls". Don’t miss!

 By Venus Zarris

This weekend marks the closing of a couple of shows that, if you haven’t seen them yet, you should make every effort to see because they are terrific and this is your LAST CHANCE!

No Darkness Round My Stone

nodark_front-268x300 Trap Door Theatre’s brilliantly dark and atmospheric macabre masterpiece about the fate of two gravedigger brothers is a rare and unusual treat that shouldn’t be missed as well as a bizarre addition to your Halloween celebrations.

No Darkness Around My Stone is a spellbinding, poignant, chilling and profound mix of existential destitution and sweet tenderness. Do not miss this unique opportunity to experience a challenging, chilling, peculiar and incomparably haunting production.

Rating: ««««

(“No Darkness Round My Stone” runs through October 11 at Trap Door Theatre, 1655 W. Cortland Ave. 773-384-0494.)

For the full review go to

www.chicagostagereview.com

 

Radium Girls

radiumgirlsposter2-194x300 Quite simply, the Chicago premier of Radium Girls, presented by Point of Contention Theatre, raises the bar for black box theater productions. Not with dazzling effects or innovative conceptualization, but rather by doing something so simple and yet so powerfully profound. It makes you care.

This is one of those hidden treasure productions that you will be thrilled that you uncovered before the time ran out! Do not miss the opportunity to experience this deceptively spellbinding, unique and wonderful production.

 

 

Rating: ««««

(“Radium Girls” runs through October 12 at The Side Project, 1439 W. Jarvis. 630-220-0730.) *tickets ONLY $15

For the full review go to

www.chicagostagereview.com

poc_radiumgirls_pressphoto3-300x225

Also closing this weekend:

(“Weekend” runs through October 12 at TimeLine Theatre, 615 W. Wellington. 773-281-8463.)  See our review here.

– Timeline Theatre’s Chicago premiere of Gore Vidal’s political classic.

(“The Threepenny Opera” runs through October 12 at Steppenwolf Merle Reskin Garage Theatre, 1624 N. Halsted St. 312-335-1650.)

The Hypocrites’ take on the Bertolt Brecht classic.

(“The U.N. Inspector” runs through October 12 at the Noyes Cultural Arts Center, 927 Noyes Street, Evanston. 847-475-1875.)

– the American Premiere by Next Theatre in Evanston.

For the full reviews go to

www.chicagostagereview.com

Review – Gore Vidal’s "Weekend"

Weekend

Reviewed by Jackie Ingram

The Chicago premiere of Gore Vidal’s Weekend, directed by Damon Kiely, is pure genius. The 1968 presidential campaign is the setting for this funny, yet politically relevant play. The play introduces us to Republican Senator MacGruder on the weekend he is to announce his candidacy for president, when his son arrives with an announcement of his own.

Weekend_image The strange twists the characters present are funny, politically savvy, and surprisingly in tune with today’s political point of view. The entire ensemble shows off their comedic timing, which I found to be vivacious and fun to watch. All the characters are excellent, my favorite being the funny Janet Ulrich Brooks, a Timeline Company member, as Mrs. Andrews. Her witty words and body language were amazing. I also enjoyed Penny Slusher as Estelle MacGruder – calm, reserved, and powerful under stress. Great stage presence. The rest of the cast includes Mica Cole (Louise Hampton), Ian Paul Custer (Norris Blotner), TimeLine Associate Artist Terry Hamilton (Senator MacGruder), TimeLine Company Member Juliet Hart (Miss Wilson), Joslyn Jones (Mrs. Hampton), Thomas Edson McElroy (Senator Andrews), Sean Nix (Roger), Joe Sherman (Beany MacGruder) and André Teamer (Dr. Hampton).

Amazingly, Weekend shows off a political point of view that, forty years later, still echoes the current issues of today.

Damon Kiely did an excellent job of directing this great cast. Mr. Kiely gave the audience a great show and disappointment will not be on the map.

So come out for a treat of political banter and laughter for two hours and ten minutes of pure entertainment. Do yourself a favor and treat yourself to a politically fun filled show at the Timeline Theatre Company at 615 W. Wellington in Chicago.

Rating: «««