Review: Guys and Dolls (Marriott Theatre)

  
  

Holy Rollers, Batman!

  
  

Brian Hissong as Sky Masterson in Marriott Theatre's 'Guys and Dolls'

  
Marriott Theatre presents
  
Guys and Dolls
  
Written by Frank Loesser
Directed and choreographed by
Matt Raftery
at
Marriott Theatre, Lincolnshire (map)
through March 27  |  tickets: $40-$48  |  more info

Reviewed by Lawrence Bommer

Damon Runyon knew Broadway like the beat of his heart—from its sewers to its gospel missions. Those in fact are two of the exotic locales in Guys and Dolls, the always lovable, inexhaustibly right 1950 musical that Frank Loesser, Jo Swerling and Abe Burrows concocted from Runyon’s delightful short stories. Collected by Loesser in 1932, those good-hearted, slang-filled tales of Broadway sharpies, Rod Thomas as Nathan, Jessie Mueller as Adelaide in Marriott Theatre's 'Guys and Doll's'floozies, high rollers, suckers, and the frustrated reformers who tried to clean up their act are still well worth the read.

For those who don’t know this merry musical, Guys and Dolls traces the very opposite attraction of gambler Sky Masterson for Sister Sarah Brown, a naïve Salvation Army lassie: An unlikely couple, by show’s end the two feel just right together. Another off-beat romance pairs Nathan Detroit, organizer of New York’s "oldest established, permanently floating crap game," and Miss Adelaide, a dimly-lit showgirl frustratedly engaged to Nathan for 14 years, who has her famous, constant cold to show for it.

Joined by such richly-named urban denizens as Harry the Horse, Benny Southstreet, and Rusty Charlie, they all return to full and happy life in this Marriott Theatre revival. If in songs like "Sit Down, You’re Rockin’ the Boat" and the title hummer, Frank Loesser found a savvy musical equivalent to Runyon’s wonderful oddballs. Director Matt Raftery has his gritty-rich equivalents too, notably Jessie Mueller as adenoidal Adelaide ("a person could develop a cold"), a wackily evasive Rod Thomas as her hilariously allergic-to-marriage Nathan, and leather-lunged George Andrew Wolff as Nicely-Nicely Johnson, a crap shooter who improbably finds religion on a bet.

     
Rod Thomas, Bernie Yvon, George Andrew Wolff, Brian Hissong in Frank Loesser's 'Guys and Dolls' at Marriott Theatre. Rod Thomas as Nathan, Jessie Mueller as Adelaide in Frank Loesser's 'Guys and Dolls' at Marriott Theatre
Rod Thomas as Nathan, Jessie Mueller as Adelaide in Marriott Theatre's 'Guys and Dolls' Abby Mueller as Sarah, Brian Hissong as Sky in Marriott Theatre's 'Guys and Dolls'.

Abby Mueller shows why Sarah is such a rich role: In her "I’ve Never Been in Love Before" and her inebriated "If I Were a Bell" she acts her way through songs that say it all. As her gambling man with a soul to be saved, suave and handsome Brian Hissong brings to "I’ll Know" and "Luck Be A Lady" a rich, unforced baritone that’s pretty persuasive. Playing Sarah’s Samaritan/Salvation mentor, Roger Mueller makes much of his tender "More I Cannot Wish You" and John Lister brings hometown conviction to Big Julie from Chicago (apparently the only thug in New York who carries a gun).

Picturing the period perfectly, Tom Ryan’s urbane set nicely set off the fedoras and loudly colored, wide-lapeled suits that costume designer Nancy Missimi contrasts with the chorines’ pink fluffery. Combine these with this cunning cast and Raftery’s crisp and unconventional choreography and you’ve got a show to lift anyone from the winter doldrums.

  
  
Rating: ★★★★
  
  

Jessie Mueller as Adelaide, Abby Mueller as Sarah - Marriott Theatre

     
     

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REVIEW: The Music Man (Marriott Theatre)

         
        

Iowa Splendid

 

 

Bernie Yvon and Danny Coonley in The Music Man - Marriott Theatre

    
Marriott Theatre presents
   
The Music Man
   
Book/Music/Lyrics by Meredith Willson
Directed by
Gary Griffin
at
Marriott Theatre, Linconshire (map)
through Jan 9  |  tickets: $40-$48  |  more info

Reviewed by Lawrence Bommer

For reasons we can only guess at, Marriott Theatre has picked it for their holiday offering. But if ever a show spelled out summer, it’s Meredith Willson‘s 1957 masterpiece The Music Man. Throughout the rollicking story the title character exudes sunny optimism, a flimflam that "Professor" Harold Hill wants to believe as much as the suckers who take it in. His buoyant drive fits the season like a picnic. You’ll forget about the winter completely over the next 150 minutes.

Johanna McKenzie Miller and Bernie Yvon in The Music Man - Marriott TheatreOf course Hill is a 1912 confidence man who hornswaggles a ragtag band into playing music, a shy boy into speaking, a town into believing in itself and a librarian into love. The sturdy story is perfectly embedded in a very particular time capsule, with Willson meticulously employing with glorious abandon assorted slang, celebrities and colorful metaphors from the era and the state.

Helping this miracle worker Hill cast his spell, Willson gives him such powerful persuasion as "Seventy-Six Trombones" and "Trouble," the famous snake-oil sermon. By the musical’s end Hill has sold far more than he knows, a passel of dreams for River City to grow on. It’s a great formula: A mysterious stranger comes to town and changes everyone for the best, including himself when he realizes that what he gives is worth far more than what he sells.

Few shows strike such a shrewd balance between downhome decency and showbiz savvy. Because The Music Man wears its songs on its sleeve, it can’t seem too slick or smooth. What matters is the tender loving care.

The heart comes through like a charm in Marriott Theatre’s easy-winning, arena revival. Intimately homespun yet always knowing, Gary Griffin’s staging trusts the material, Willson’s fast-moving book, deceptively clever lyrics and unimprovable melodies–and gets them right throughout.

The look, for instance: Tom Ryan‘s clever, flexible and detailed set pieces combine to create a richly nostalgic Iowa setting, and Nancy Missimi’s fashionplate period costumes complete the illusion.

The human illusions are equally on target. Conning with unforced charm, Bernie Yvon offers a Harold Hill who listens as much as hoodwinks; like a good salesman he connects with the townsfolk until you see how much he means it. His charm is non-negotiable, though the changes he undergoes are a bit harder to measure under Yvon’s boundless confidence.

Barbara Cook and Shirley Jones notwithstanding (comparisons are odious), Johanna McKenzie Miller nicely inhabits Marian’s rich mix of spinster standoffishness and idealistic yearning. Her "Till There Was You" is earned by every line she’s said. (The fact that she also sounds just like Cook in her perfect prime doesn’t hurt in the least either.)

The cast of The Music Man - Marriott Theatre 2

Johnny Rabe and Danny Coonley in The Music Man - Marriott Theatre Johanna McKenzie Miller and Bernie Yvon in The Music Man - Marriott Theatre 3

Like the leads, the supporting roles betray much more life than art, even the hammy stock roles like John Reeger‘s pompous mayor, Iris Lieberman as his starched-blouse wife, Mary Ernster as Marian’s matchmaking mother and Andy Lupp as Hill’s gleeful trickster accomplice.

As the decent local kids whom Harold helps, Adrian Aguilar and Amanda Tanguay carry the romantic subplot with goofy grace. Special credit goes to little Johnny Rabe whose bashful Winthrop wails out "Gary, Indiana" as if he just made it up.

Finally, Matt Raftery‘s unshowy choreography reminds us that these are unpretentious Iowans whooping it up as best they can: There’s no showoff hoofing here. The “Shipoopi” explodes with prewar pep and a palpable joy that makes the most difficult dancing seem a gift to perform as much as perceive. David Kreppel’s musical direction is assured, especially in the barbershop-quartet offerings.

 

  
  
Rating: ★★★★
 
 

The performance schedule is Wednesdays at 1pm and 8pm, Thursday and Fridays at 8pm, Saturdays at 4:30pm and 8pm, and Sundays at 1pm and 5pm.  There will be an added performance Tuesday, 11/23 at 8pm and Friday, 11/26 at 4:30pm.  No performances Tuesday-Thursday, Nov 24th and 25th.

The cast of The Music Man - Marriott Theatre

 

 

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REVIEW: A Chorus Line (Marriott Theatre)

Gotta Dance!

 

Chorus Line at Marriott

   
Marriott Theatre presents
   
A Chorus Line
   
Music by Marvin Hamlisch, Lyrics by Edward Kleban
Book by James Kirkwood and Nicholas Dante
Directed by Mark Lococo
at Marriott Theatre, 10 Marriott Drive, Lincolnshire (map)
Through October 31  |  tickets: $35-$48  |  more info

reviewed by Lawrence Bommer

Mara Davi as Cassie - Chorus Line MarriottCelebrating its 35th anniversary in a terrific revival staged by Mark Lococo, A Chorus Line remains the late Michael Bennett‘s breakthrough backstage musical, winner of nine Tony Awards and the Pulitzer Prize. In this "show before a show" the parts–the 17 dancers–outweigh the whole. That greater good is an imaginary musical where, as the hoofers swagger in Nancy Missimi’s gold lamé suits against massive mirrors, their Broadway fantasies come true. But by then we know “what they did for” dance.”

Most musicals are examples of art imitating life. Not so A Chorus Line. It fascinates because its constantly young cast insure that this show is a textbook case of life imitating art imitating life. (Actors in 2010 who could be the children of the 1975 cast are creating the 1975 creation that was itself inspired by the reality of 1975 dancers.) The recessed mirrors in Marriott’s Production perfectly symbolize the backstage, show-before-a-show nature of this unconventional depiction of the creation of a very conventional Broadway musical. (Remember: The finale, “One Singular Sensation,” is really intended as a backup to a star of the Streisand, Verdon or Ann Miller persuasion. “Chorus Line” may be all about dance but the “outside” musical that they’re creating is not.)  

It’s ironic that, after we get to know the "dance gypsies" chosen from the 24 who endure this grueling try-out, the survivors get swallowed up in "One," this massive finale where what counts is the lockstep anonymity of a kick line. The humanity that went into the song-confessionals, where the auditioners testified to the resilience, sexiness, escapism and transience of their trade, yields to the conformity of interchangeable parts. This "one singular sensation" is American individuality feeding American efficiency. Another all-too-American quality, at least at this stage of the recession, is the desperation that surges through “I Need This Job.”

 

Anika Ellis as Shiela - Chorus Line Marriott Bryan Knowlton as Paul - Chorus Line Marriott
Chorus Line - One Singular Sensation Nina Fluke as Val - Chorus Line Marriott
Chorus Line Cast - Marriott

Before that chorus/assembly line closes ranks, we’ve felt the full diversity of the dancers, as preserved from interviews that Bennett did with the original dancers some 35 years ago. It’s ironic that the current dancers may have their own stories but they’re in effect prisoners of the musical’s now-distant past.

In Lococo’s devoted reprise of this not-so-retro musical, a second (or third?) generation solidly replay the life stories of the 1975 originals, slinking and strutting their way through Bennett’s pizzazz-packed choreography (here re-imagined by Rachel Rockwell) and tearing into Marvin Hamlisch‘s sturdy score. This arena staging may be in the round but the mirrors work even better than in a proscenium  production. They may not suggest many more dancers than the cast itself but the recessed effect makes it look like we’re seeing memories as much as moments here.

Adam Estes as Gregory - Chorus Line MarriottFleshing out showbiz stereotypes with true-life immediacy, Alexander Aguilar relishes the effortless bravura of "I Can Do That" and Pilar Millhollen belts out the tough-girl wisdom of "What I Did for Love." As Sheila, the aging but indomitable siren, Anika Ellis purges her past in "At the Ballet," while Nina Fluke reinvents Val’s surgical saga in "Dance: Ten; Looks: Three."

In the one unsung solo, Bryan Knowlton digs heartache from Paul’s tale of a gay dancer unexpectedly accepted by his family. Registering the full joy of moving fast, buffed-up Max Kumangai is a blurry revelation.

As he shapes the audition-rehearsal with God-like omniscience, Chicago favorite Tim Gregory brings easy authority to confessor-choreographer Zach, though his soap-opera showdown with Cassie, his old flame, seems perfunctory. Undeterred, Broadway notable Mara Davi (who appeared in the recent revival) throws herself into "The Music and the Mirror," Cassie’s tour-de-force dance sequence. It should feel as if everyone who ever danced the part were with her but on opening night she seemed to lose her terpsichorean motivations and it fell flat.

First and always, the revival confirms the continuing cause for its docu-tribute: Bennett’s high-strutting, soul-stirring dances are a perfect match for the aspirations this musical will always extol.

   
   
Rating: ★★★★
   
   

Chorus Line - One Singular Sensation2

 

   
   

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REVIEW: Pinocchio (Marriott Theatre)

A thrilling show for kids of all ages

 

PINOCCHIO Jameson Cooper and Cory Goodrich 2

   
Marriott Children’s Theatre presents
   
Pinocchio
   
Music, Lyrics and Book by Marc Robin
Directed and Choreographed by
Rachel Rockwell
Musical Direction by
Roberta Duchak
at
Marriott Theatre, Lincolnshire (map)
through August 29th  |  tickets: $15  |  more info

reviewed by Allegra Gallian

When people think of Pinnocchio, most would refer back to the Disney movie featuring the morally-conscious Jiminy Cricket and the wonderfully naïve little wooden puppet who dreams of becoming a real, live boy. Not this time. Marriott Lincolnshire’s Children’s Theatre has brought a new spin to the beloved fairy tale through their original musical production of Pinocchio, adapted for the stage by Marc Robin.

PINOCCHIO Michael Haws, Jackson Evans, Jameson Cooper 2 Minimal set pieces cover the stage, giving way for the large personalities of each character to fill the space. Just a worktable and door frame rest on the stage of the in-the-round theatre. Still, there’s a cozy feeling running through as groups of children and their parents take their seats. A fantasy-like quality is emitted and, as the lights go down and anticipation builds, the stage is dimly lit by a singular center spot on Geppetto’s work table, where the puppet Pinocchio rests.

The well-known character of Geppetto (Michael Haws) instantly brings an energy to the stage as he introduces his puppet shop through a cheerful song-and-dance number. Haws conveys the kind and gentle feel of the old wood-worker, creating an engaging presence that’s hard not to bond with. With the energy level set high from the start, Pinocchio, under the direction of Rachel Rockwell, flows smoothly along with quick scene changes and keeps an excited buzz running to the audience.

After Geppetto’s wife dies, he spends his lonely nights wishing on stars until he meets a new friend, an over-the-top grasshopper name G. Hopper. Played by Jackson Evans, Hopper is a larger-than-life character, full of energy as he bounces and flits around the stage. Evans’ Hopper provides plenty of laughs with his adept comedic timing throughout the production.

As a foil to the rest of the cast’s lively antics, the Blue Fairy (Cory Goodrich) creates a regal and calming presence. She comes to grant Geppetto’s wish of bringing the puppet Pinocchio to life because Geppetto has been such a good and honest man his whole life. Goodrich supplies a genuine characterization that truly touches the audience. Her voice fills the stage as she sings of all the positive attributes Pinocchio will need to possess if he’s ever to become a real boy.

Once Geppetto’s wish is granted, Pinocchio (Jameson Cooper) is taught to walk and talk in a catchy musical duet by his newly named conscience, Hopper. Evans and Cooper’s freshly-formed friendship feels authentic and honest. Throughout his misadventures: ditching school, hanging out at Pleasure Island and getting lost in a whale, Cooper offers up an adorable portrayal of Pinocchio with a quality endearing him immediately to audience members.

PINOCCHIO Jameson Cooper as Pinocchio

Cory Goodrich as Blue Fairy Jackson Evans as Hopper

With musicals, one generally expect the singing to be top-notch. Unfortunately, this is where Pinocchio comes up short. The singing is good-quality work, but not stellar – which may partly be caused by the fast-paced choreography. That being said, Goodrich’s Blue Fairy sings with a wonderful soprano voice that rings clear to the back of the house.

While the singing lacks, Rachel Rockwell’s choreography shines. Intricate dance numbers are a pleasure to watch, and it’s clear that these actors have natural dance talent. There’s even a crowd-pleasing scene at Pleasure Island complete with beat boxing and break dancing, spectacularly performed by Adrian Aguilar.

What really promotes the magic of this show is the exceptional lighting design by Jesse Klug. The fanciful, special effects lighting creates a fairy tale world full of color and enchantment that transports the audience to a world of wonder.  Jesse Gaffney’s minimalist set also elevates the magic.

Pinocchio proves to be a thrilling show for kids of all ages who wish to be marveled by inherently good blue fairies and hopeful wooden boys whose wishes come true by telling the truth and always letting your conscience be your guide.

   
   
Rating: ★★★
   
   

Jackson Evans as Hopper, Jameson Cooper as Pinocchio

Pinocchio plays Wednesday through Sunday at 10:00 am through August 29th at the Marriott Theatre, 10 Marriott Dr., in Lincolnshire. Single and group tickets are available. Call 847-634-0200 or visit www.MarriottTheatre.com.

     

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REVIEW: Ragtime (Drury Lane Oakbrook)

Drury Lane scores big with epic musical “Ragtime”

RAGTIME-_The_cast

 
Drury Lane Oakbrook presents
 
Ragtime
 
Based on the novel by E.L. Doctorow
by
Terrance McNally (book), Stephen Flaherty (music), Lynn Ahrens (lyrics)
directed/choreographed by
Rachel Rockwell
at
Drury Lane Theatre, Oakbrook (map)
through May 23 (more info)

By Katy Walsh

‘What can happen in a year?’ Father’s question is an expectation that life is simple and predictable.

BF1C0838 The reality is birth, death, emancipation, persecution, obsession, syncopation. In 1906, the regularity in life takes unexpected turns as Drury Lane Oakbrook presents Ragtime The Musical. The show focuses on the lives of three groups: WASPs, blacks, and immigrants. In the New York suburbs, a wealthy family breaks the monotony with wild excursions and celebrity stalking. In Harlem, a successful black piano player decides to search for his lost love. Just off the boat, an Jewish immigrant artist and his daughter arrive with nothing but optimistic anticipation. Three distinctly different rhythms unexpectedly intersect to create a new tune. Ragtime celebrates a year in American history by paralleling the adaption of ragtime music with socio-economic changes of the time period. The results are a stunning history lesson intertwined with melodies of hope and change.

Under the skillful direction and choreography of Rachel Rockwell, the tempo never misses a beat. Rockwell strikes all the right notes with this multi-talented cast. Quentin Earl Darrington (Coalhouse) is the powerhouse of emotional range in song and act. His tune changes throughout the show – regret, love, vengeance. Darrington connects the audience with his story based on heart wrenching hope. His “The Wheels of a Dream” duet with Valisia LeKae (Sarah) is flawless. LeKae is a perfect match-up and their onstage chemistry is the epic-love-story-kind. Cory Goodrich (Mother) is marvelous in an understated and nonchalant way. Goodrich’s character changes her family’s life dramatically with simple choices. Her transformation is most baffling to Father played by Larry Adams. In a pivotal song, Adams is perplexed as he sings, ‘I thought I knew what love was but these lovers play different music.’

With inspirational paternal love, Mark David Kaplan (Tateh) chases a train for a teary-eyed audience impact. Alongside the principals, smaller and famous roles engage curiosity. Emma Goldman (Catherine Lord) influences as a social reformer. Evelyn Nesbit (Summer Naomi Smart) is the Brittany Spears of the time period…whee! Harry Houdini (Stef Tovar) mystifies as a successful immigrant. Booker T. Washington (James Earl Jones II) commands integration and respect.

BF1C1085 Larry_and_Cory
BF1C0803 BF1C0945 Mark_Kaplan-Jennifer_Baker

Surprisingly, this blockbuster musical starts with a stark stage. The introduction of characters is a popped up portrait of perfection. Literally, group entrances are elevated from below stage. As the three groups multiply across the stage, the unique flair of costume distinction, designed by Santo Loquasto, is a spectacular visual. Costumes, projections, lighting, moments of tasty eye candy decorate this show. From silhouettes marching to swimmers bathing, the imagery dances to the ragtime.

And there was distant music, simple and somehow sublime. Giving the nation a new syncopation.  The people called it Ragtime!’

Paralleling life’s happenstance, my performance had some twists not necessarily planned. There seemed to be an issue with lighting up the solo singers in the first few scenes. A momentary blip broke the backdrop illusion with a ‘Microsoft word computer screen’ projection. Initially, the audio seemed hollow. I was uncertain if it was a microphone or acoustic issue. It either cleared up or my engrossment made it a moot point. All in all, this production was amazing. It left me reinforced that a gesture of kindness changes life’s courses and bewildered about men’s obsessions with cars.

 
Rating: ★★★★
 

BF1C0810

 

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REVIEW: Funny Girl (Drury Lane Oakbrook)

Go to ‘Funny Girl’ for the music

 Marc Grapey Adam Pelty Sara Shepard Jameson Cooper Tammy Mad

Drury Lane Oakbrook Terrace presents:

Funny Girl

Music by Jule Styne, lyrics by Bob Merrill, book by Isobel Lennart
Conceived by Gary Griffin and William Osetek and directed by William Osetek with associate director David New
Music direction by Ben Johnson
Through March 7 (ticket info)

reviewed by Leah A. Zeldes

Sara Shepard Barbra Streisand so owned her role in Funny Girl that the 1964 musical has never had a Broadway revival. Loosely based on the life of stage and screen star Fanny Brice (1891–1951), the original ran 1,348 performances, became a hit film in 1968 and forever associated the songs "People" and "Don’t Rain on My Parade" with Streisand. Since the leading actress sings 14 of the 19 songs in the score, that’s a tough act to follow.

So let’s get the inevitable comparison over with: Spirited Sara Sheperd, in the leading role of Drury Lane Oakbrook Terrace’s solid, sophisticated production of "Funny Girl," neither looks nor sounds like Streisand. In fact, she resembles Brice more closely than Streisand does. Her voice, though, is all her own, and she more than holds her own in the part.

If you’re going to this musical for the music, you won’t be disappointed. Jule Styne and Bob Merrill wrote wonderful songs and Sheperd gives them full measure.

Acting excels, as well. Sheperd plays Fanny with verve and a Brooklyn tang. We also see fine acting and talented dance moves from Jameson Cooper, as her fallback friend and mentor Eddie Ryan. Catherine Smitko is keenly sardonic as Fanny’s saloon-keeping mother, and Paul Anthony Stewart suavely shallow as her smooth-talking lover, Nick Arnstein.

If you’re looking for the color and grandeur of Brice’s vaudeville and "Ziegfeld Follies" career, that’s another story. This is a dark version of a troublesome show.

Holly Stauder Iris Lieberman Cathy Smitko Mary Mulligan Joey Stone Ensemble
Joey Stone Sara Shepard Nicole Hren Ariane Dolan Jameson Cooper

Told as a flashback in short, choppy scenes, the storyline covers the feisty comedienne’s determined rise from little-known Brooklyn performer to Broadway star and her love affair with Arnstein, a playboy, gambler and con man. Isobel Lennart’s uneven book reduces Brice’s life to a series of aphorisms. Stamped more by 1960s sensibilities than by those of Brice’s lifetime, the script sweeps aside such issues as Brice’s pre-wedlock pregnancy and sends a slew of mixed messages.

Are we supposed to admire Fanny for her plucky self-confidence as a performer or pity her for her profound insecurity over her looks? Should we applaud the stick-to-itiveness that leads her to practice all night or the devil-may-care with which she abandons long-sought success and leaves associates in the lurch to go running after a man? "Funny Girl" seesaws so rapidly through different moods, we’re left to wonder whether it’s a comedy or a tragedy.

Paul Anthony Stewart Paul Anthony Stewart Sara Shepard Sara Shepard 2

Every show needn’t have deep meaning, and I don’t mind much when songs and dance numbers trump plot and continuity in musicals. This production, weighted toward the downside, though, gives us little razzmatazz to counter the incongruities of the script.

Sheperd’s renditions of the well-known songs sometimes come off as slightly breathless, making numbers like "I’m the Greatest Star" curiously understated. Restrained scenes out of the celebrated "Follies" add no flash — in Act II’s "Rat-Tat-Tat-Tat," for example, costume designer Elizabeth Flauto dresses the chorus in olive drab, and the showgirls of the chorus wander through the scenes clad in street clothes or rehearsal wear. Instead of Ziegfeld’s pomp and glamour, we get rear-alley views and lackluster dance sequences. The stage often looks too empty.

A brave production, with excellent performances, Funny Girl is worth its ticket price, but don’t expect catharsis. At show’s end, we don’t know whether to applaud Fanny or cry for her.

Rating: ★★★

Kent Haina Nicki Hren Joey Stone Zach Zube Anne Acker Jarret