REVIEW: Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (Theatre-Hikes)

Exploring good and evil in the great outdoors

 

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Theatre-Hikes presents
   
Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde
   
Written/Adapted by Jeffrey Hatcher
Based on novella by
Robert Louis Stevenson
Directed by
Bradley Baker
at
Morton Arboretum, 4100 Illinois 53, Lisle (map)
through October 31  |  tickets: $13-$19   |  more info

Reviewed by Allegra Gallian

Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, adapted by Jeffrey Hatcher, is based on the original novella “Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde” by Robert Louis Stevenson. Both the play and the original work explore the fine lines between good and evil and what those characteristics can do to a man.

The Morton Arboretum sets the scene for the Theatre-Hikes production of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde. The vast outdoor space leaves plenty of room for the actor’s personalities to shine through. With the leaves of the trees changing and the wind Theatre-Hikes - Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde014 rustling through the fallen leaves, there is a unique and apt ambience that surrounds both the actors and the audience. Although it was a little chilly, once the action began it no longer seemed to matter.

Jekyll/Hyde opens on the main characters finding Dr. Jekyll unconscious which leads to flash backs exposing the chain of events leading to Jekyll’s current state. The story unfolds through journal entries, police reports, notes and other writings from the main characters. To begin, two of Jekyll’s friends, Richard Enfield (Zach Bloomfield) and Gabriel Utterson (James Stanton) discuss a peculiar occurrence witnessed and how the man involved is related to Jekyll. The play opens rather strongly, setting a good tone for the rest of the performance. Energy levels are high and stay high throughout the two-hour run of the show. It’s also clear that the actor’s work with their dialect coach, Allison Reinke, has paid off because their accents effortlessly transport the audience back to London in 1883.

The two men meet with Dr. Jekyll (Dan Toot) and discuss the event only to find out the man involved; Mr. Hyde (played at various times by James Stanton, Zach Bloomfield, Geoff Crump and Ellenkate Finley) is an acquaintance of Jekyll. Toot offers up a calm demeanor with Dr. Jekyll and creates an authentic presence on stage. He gives off a confident and intellectual air, as one expects from a doctor.

The character of Mr. Hyde, although played by aforementioned actors throughout the course of the play, is mainly played by Geoff Crump. Crump also does the best job of portraying the terrifying and menacing Mr. Hyde. It’s never quite clear why four actors have been cast to play this one character, for although the others did a fine job, in the end they pull focus from Crump, who proves to be the most devilish and mysterious of them all.

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Continuing on, the play continues to tell the parallel stories of Jekyll and Hyde. Mr. Hyde meets a woman, Elizabeth Jelkes, (Amanda Presz) and they fall in love. Despite all the bad he has done and that he inherently is, she loves him. However, their first meeting is a frightful one when Hyde pulls a knife on her. Unfortunately, the feelings of fear and raw emotion could have be taken further in the beginning – it doesn’t feel like a genuine fear or evil. That being said, as the show progresses, Presz and Crump get in synch with their characters, creating a much more realistic portraits; pulling the audience into the action.

Theatre-Hikes - Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde028As we learn more about the dichotomies between Jekyll and Hyde, it becomes increasingly captivating. All the actors do a terrific job of keeping the audience in the  moment.  Thus, when a scene ends and the audience must move to the next scene location (the hike part of Theatre-Hikes), there’s a moment a surprise at being taken out of the action on stage. Once settled, the actors are able to jump right back in and immediately the audience is, once again, lost in this fantasy world.

Bloomfield, who plays several parts throughout (Sir Danvers Carew, Richard Enfield, O.F. Sanderson, Inspector, Hyde 2) does a wonderful job of switching between them. The characters come off different and unique, which is important. As Jekyll, Enfield, Utterson Toot, Bloomfield and Stanton have good stage chemistry, and it’s definitely believable that they are old friends or colleagues.

As Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde concludes with its final scenes, Crump as Hyde (3) really comes into his element. He pushes his character to its limits, creating depth and a large character arch, making for an overall enjoyable production.  What better way is there to see a top-notch performance AND get a workout all at the same time?!!

   
   
Rating: ★★★
   
   

Theatre-Hikes - Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde021Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde plays at the Morton Arboretum through October 31. Tickets are $13 to $19 and can be purchased through the Theatre-Hikes website.

       
     

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Stuart Carden appointed Writers’ Theatre Associate AD

StuartCarden Writers’ Theatre has appointed Stuart Carden associate artistic director.

I’m so excited to be in collaboration with Stuart,” said Michael Halberstam, executive director the Writers’. “He has a rich background in literary development, a keen and ambitious scope of work as a director and a passion for the administrative challenges that come with supporting artistic direction. In a very short time I believe we will see Stuart’s strength of perspective and influence find its way onto the stages of Writers’ Theatre.”

Says Carden:

“I’m thrilled to be back home in the thriving Chicago theatre community as Writers’ Theatre’s new associate artistic director. Michael Halberstam and Kathryn Lipuma have created something extraordinary in Glencoe and I’m honored to join the passionate and vibrant group of artists and theater-makers that call Writers’ home. Through the course of my career my theatrical raison d’être has been helping bring new and diverse voices to the stage and I’m looking forward to bringing that passion for new work to Writers’ exciting Literary Development Initiative.”

Stuart Carden joins Writers’ Theatre as associate artistic director after two seasons at City Theatre Company in Pittsburgh where he was associate artistic director. As a new play specialist, Stuart has helped to develop over thirty plays, twelve of which he directed in their world premiere productions. Notable regional, U.S., and world premieres include works by Martin Crimp, David Henry Hwang, Tristine Skyler, Jeffrey Hatcher, Shishir Kurup, Richard Dresser and Yussef El Guindi. Last season his production of Martin McDonagh’s The Lieutenant of Inishmore at The Repertory Theatre of St. Louis garnered five Kevin Kline nominations including “Outstanding Production” and “Outstanding Director.”

In Chicago he directed the world premiere production of Shishir Kurup’s The Merchant on Venice at Silk Road Theatre Project, which was named one of the top ten plays of 2007 by the Chicago Tribune, Chicago Sun-Times and Time Out Chicago. Other recent new play work includes directing Mary’s Wedding, The Pillowman, Stones in his Pockets, A Picasso, The Moonlight Room, 10 Acrobats in an Amazing Leap of Faith, Big Love and Back of the Throat. Classical and classically inspired directing projects include The False Servant, Spring Awakening, Life is a Dream, The Crucible, The Game of Love and Chance, Miss Julie, A Streetcar Named Desire and his own adaptation of Nikolai Gogol’s Diary of a Madman.

Stuart has taught acting, directing and movement at Carnegie Mellon University, The Hartt School, Loyola University, Beloit College and Act One Studios. He holds an M.F.A. in directing from Carnegie Mellon University and is a member of the Stage Directors and Choreographers Society. In the 2009/10 season Stuart is slated to direct David Harrower’s Blackbird at City Theatre Company and a play very familiar to Writers’ Theatre audiences, Crime and Punishment adapted by Curt Columbus and Marilyn Campbell, at The Repertory Theatre of St. Louis.

For more info about the Writers’ Theatre, please visit www.writerstheatre

h/t BroadwayWorld.com

Northlight Theatre announces 2008/09 season

 

Northlight  Theatre 2008/09 Season

 

Doctor Jekyll & Mr. Hyde

Adapted by Jeffrey Hatcher

Based on the novella by Robert Louis Stevenson

Directed by Jessica Thebus

What happened the night that Henry Jekyll died? Against the backdrop of Victorian London, the respected doctor has begun to display alarmingly erratic behavior toward his friends.  At the wsame time, a mysterious figure haunts the city’s streets under the cloak of the London fog.  This fiendishly clever and theatrically innovative new adaptation of Robert Louis Stevenson’s classic tale is a smart, psychological thriller that delights in revealing the many faces of Edward Hyde.

September 17 – October 26, 2008

 

 

Grey Gardens

Book by Doug Wright, music by Scott Frankel, lyrics by Michael Korie

Directed by BJ Jones

Musical direction by Doug Peck

Rub elbows with Edith Bouvier Beale and her daughter “Little Edie,” – Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis’ most scandalous relatives!  Once the highest of high society, the two have become East Hampton’s most notorious recluses, living in a dilapidated 28-room mansion with 51 cats for company.  Set in two eras – 1941 when the celebrated estate was the picture of wealth and sophistication, and 1973 after it had been reduced to squalor – Grey Gardens is a brilliant and heartbreaking look at two indomitable women.

November 12 – December 21, 2008

 

 

Po Boy Tango

By Kenneth Lin

Translated by Martin Crimp

Directed by Chay Yew

A celebration of the human spirit and the joy of cooking, Po Boy Tango tells the story of Richie Po, a Chinese immigrant who turns to his estranged friend Gloria to help him recreate his mother’s “Great Banquet.”  Despite the challenges of shark fin soup, duck po boy sandwiches and underlying cultural tensions, Richie and Gloria find common ground through their shared humor and the blending of traditional Taiwanese cuisine and African American “Soul Food.”  Helped by lessons from Po Moma’s television cooking show, the two discover a deeper understanding of food, culture and the nature of friendship.

January 7   February 15, 2009

 

 

Mauritius

By Theresa Rebeck

Directed by Dexter Bullard

The stakes are high when half-sisters inherit a book of rare stamps that may include the “crown jewel” of the stamp-collection world.  The battle for possession takes a dangerous turn when three rival collectors enter the sisters’ world, willing to go to any lengths to stake their claim on the find.  Combining the best aspects of Hitchcock, Chandler and Mamet, “Mauritius” is a gripping blend of sharp comedy and heart-pounding drama that simmers with constant surprise.

February 25 – April 5, 2009

 

 

The Lieutenant of Inishmore

By Martin McDonagh

Directed by BJ Jones

“Wee Thomas” the cat has been killed.  What’s worse, he was the beloved pet of Padraic – a ruthless Irish hitman who considers the IRA “too soft.”  As the folks back home fight over who has to break the bad news, the violence escalates – recalling Shakespeare and Quentin Tarantino at their bloody best.  A few murders, several dismemberments and a smattering of cow mutilations later, all is finally right with the world again.  Or is it?  In this wickedly funny black comedy from the author of “The Cripple of Inishmaan”, “A Skull in Connemara” and the recent film “In Bruges”, McDonagh considers the implications of outrageous reactions to small misunderstandings.

April 29   June 7, 2009

 

For more information, call 847-673-6300, or go to www.northlight.org