Review: 42nd Street (Marriott Theatre)

  
  

Shuffle off to Buffalo Lincolnshire

  
  

Drew Humphrey as Billy Lawlor with Ensemble

  
Marriott Theatre presents
  
42nd Street
     
Book by Michael Stewart and Mark Bramble
Music by Harry Warren; Lyrics by Al Dubin 
Directed by Rachel Rockwell
at Marriott Theatre, Lincolnshire (map)
through May 29  |  tickets: $40-$48  |  more info

Reviewed by Lawrence Bommer

We can’t, it seems, get enough of The Understudy Who Becomes A Star, especially when the hokey, sappy and satisfying story is stuffed with thrills like "Lullaby of Broadway" and "Young and Healthy." Some clichés justify themselves, if only because nothing less than hokey can fill the sentiment completely.

Kaitlyn Davidson as Peggy SawyerWhen Busby Berkeley‘s 1933 film classic "42nd Street" (with its superb score by Harry Warren and Al Dubin) became in 1980 a successful, Tony-winning musical, the last offering from the great Gower Champion, it proved you don’t need a Depression to justify a good time (though the number "We’re in the Money" sounds more like wishful thinking than ever).

Almost 80 years later, Peggy Sawyer, the tap-dancing chorus girl from Allentown who makes it big on the Great White Way, replays her all-American success story in Marriott Lincolnshire Theatre’s electric revival. Rachel Rockwell’s staging provides, as if needed, more proof that an arena staging can hold its own with a proscenium one for sheer moxie, showbiz savvy and pure pizzazz. (It helps to have a revolving stage to imitate the motions of Busby Berkeley’s overhead cameras.)

Peppy, perky, breezy and campy in the cutest way, the musical also preserves the film’s hungry edge and desperate-to-please energy. The big change is to downplay the chirpy Ruby Keeler-William Powell romance between plucky chorus girl and smiling juvenile and to play up (to please original producer David Merrick) Peggy’s fixation on her hard-boiled, devilishly driven director Julian Marsh. It gets in the way of the show’s chief interest–how Peggy can overcome her shyness, discover her undeniable talent and sell it–and the show ”Pretty Lady”–to the world.

The tribute to the "glittering gulch" of Times Square is as fine a hymn to showbiz solidarity and team spirit as A Chorus Line, 42nd Street glows with solid showmanship in Rockwell’s knowing, loving revival. If the arena production lacks Robin Wagner’s showy sets from the Broadway production (most notably in the mirrored "Shadow Waltz," here clumsily done with silhouettes on a screen, and the awesome Broad Street terminal where "Lullaby" gets hoofed out), Tammy Mader’s pulse-pounding choreography supplies its own heart-stopping spectacle.

     
Tom Galantich as Julian Marsh Drew Humphrey as Billy, Kaitlyn Davidson as Peggy
Drew Humphrey as Billy Lawlor with Ensemble 2 Roger Mueller as Abner, Catherine Lord as Dorothy

The opening tap dance rouser is enough to bring down the house but the house continued to tumble with the Ziegfeld spectacle of "Dames," the chaotic precision of "Getting Out of Town," the marquee-bright splendor of the title song and the vaudeville hijinks of "Shuffle Off to Buffalo" (complete with tiny sleeping cars that revealed chorus girls in salacious lingerie). The chorus boys and girls are worth their weight in Kruggerands.

Carrying the show as no understudy ever could is Kaitlyn Davidson, a platinum-blond Peggy Sawyer whose inexhaustible tap dancing and lyrical assurance can only improve on Ruby Keeler’s wooden original. Drew Humphrey, as her adoring but muted Billy, smilingly exploits what’s left of a role that was virtually handed over to Julian. Tom Galantich plays him with the right mix of messianic rigor and paternal regard, but Julian remains a character who seems warmer on the page than he ever is in life.

Making up for Thomas Ryan’s clever but minimal set pieces (some perhaps dating back to Marriott’s first production in 1993) are Nancy Missimi‘s time-travelling costumes, Depression elegant in their flouncy escapism.

  
      
Rating: ★★★½
  
   

Cast of 42nd Street - Marriott Theatre

Continue reading

REVIEW: Dirty Rotten Scoundrels (Theatre at the Center)

Bad People, Great Musical

 

 DRS- Dara Cameron and ensemble

   
Theatre at the Center presents
   
Dirty Rotten Scoundrels
   
Book by Jeffrey Lane
Music/Lyrics by
David Yazbek
Directed by
William Pullinsi
Theatre at the Center, 1040 Ridge, Munster, IN (map)
through October 10  |  tickets: $36-$40  |  more info

Reviewed by Keith Ecker 

I really didn’t know what to expect walking into the regional premier of Dirty Rotten Scoundrels. First, because the musical is based on the 1988 comedy, I wondered whether it would be another repackaged Hollywood film set to music and fed back to us. Second, Dirty Rotten Scoundrels is a production of Theatre at the Center (TATC), located in Munster, Indiana. It truly is a rare occasion when I get to venture out of the city proper, and so I was eager, as well as a little skeptical, to see if TATC would rival Chicago-quality theatre. By the end of the play, I was certainly reassured that, yes, Hollywood films can be transformed into worthwhile musicals, and, yes, good theatre exists beyond the city limits.

DRS- Larry Adams and Paula Scrofano Dirty Rotten Scoundrels focuses on two European-based professional swindlers. Lawrence Jameson (Larry Wyatt) is the refined cad who fabricates a princely back story for himself, which he uses to pray upon the dreams and sympathies of naïve, wealthy women. His rival, who he encounters by chance, is Freddy Benson (Michael Mahler). Freddy is an amateur thief who, after discovering Lawrence’s true identity, encourages Lawrence to teach him the ways of the rogue.

Eventually, the teacher-student relationship transforms into a competition, where Lawrence and Freddy wager on who is the more skillful scoundrel. At the center of this bet is Christine Colgate (Dara Cameron), a wealthy American heiress. The two hatch elaborate schemes to win her over, and a comedy of errors ensues.

The musical (book by Jeffrey Lane with music and lyrics by David Yazbek) is genuinely funny. The writing is sharp, so sharp that I enjoyed the non-musical portions of the show just as much as the singing and dancing. Witty word play and even some risqué off-color jokes appear throughout, as do the occasional pop-culture references. There’s also plenty of meta-humor, too, with characters toying with the art form’s conventions.

The caliber of singing and acting talent rivals that of any big-time, downtown Chicago production. Wyatt, Mahler and Cameron all give standing-ovation-worthy performances. Harmonies are pitch perfect, and timing is impeccable. What more could you want out of a cast?

 

DRS- Michael Mahler and ensemble Great Big Stuff DRS- Dara Cameron, Michael Mahler and Larry Wyatt

Speaking of rivaling downtown productions, TATC definitely has the firepower to produce a large-scale spectacle. The lighting system alone looks like something out of “Close Encounters of the Third Kind”. All actors are outfitted with mics, making it very easy to hear every word and note throughout the spacious auditorium.

The only element stopping me from giving this production four stars is its pace. The play, with intermission, runs about two-and-a-half hours. Although William Pullinsi’s direction is otherwise commendable, he relies too heavily on blackouts to transition from scene to scene. This bogs down the musical, draining some of its momentum.

TATC’s Dirty Rotten Scoundrels goes to show that being out of the Loop isn’t necessarily a bad thing. If you’re in the mood for a hilarious musical with a good story and excellent performances, go see this play.

   
   
Rating: ★★★½
  
   

DRS- Michael Mahler, Larry Wyatt and Lauren CreelPerformances are Wednesdays and Thursdays at 2pm.; Fridays and Saturdays at 8pm, Sundays at 2:30pm; select Thursdays at 7:30 or 8pm. and Saturdays at 2:30pm. Ticket prices range from $36 – $40.  For ticket info, call the Box Office (219.836.3255), Tickets.com (800.511.1552) or visit www.TheatreAtTheCenter.com.

      
     

Continue reading