REVIEW: Suicide, Incorporated (Gift Theatre)

Working 9 to 5 – for an Easier Way Out

 

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Gift Theatre presents
  
Suicide, Incorporated
   
Written by Andrew Hinderaker
Directed by
Jonathan Berry
at
Gift Theatre, 4802 N. Milwaukee (map)
through July 25th  |  tickets: $25  |  more info

reviewed by Paige Listerud

Gift Theatre’s tightly woven cast make the most of Andrew Hinderaker’s world premiere one-act, Suicide, Incorporated. Directed by Jonathan Berry, the play cleverly provides them with a lot of most to make. First, it features a business whose mission is to mold a suicide’s dead-end perspective into a skillfully crafted final farewell letter; second, the play depicts the general corporate tendency to reframe life’s tragedies into manageable chunks of reality that will yield to its scripted dialogues and flowcharts. Scott, owner and founder of the business, is played with sharp, savage and mercenary relish by Ed Flynn. Yet even he is just using the tools he’s learned in business school to create order against the inexorable pull of suicide’s black hole. Too bad he cannot avoid creating new victims, like his manically kiss-ass assistant, Perry (Jay Worthington).

josh&mikediner-1.jpg_20100616_13_54_26_26-116-165 We find his new employee, Jason (Joshua Rollins), a writer of former Hallmark Card fame, already well down that rabbit hole—conversing with shadowy figures like his younger brother Tommy (Mike Harvey) and last-chance customers like wheelchair-bound Norm (Michael Patrick Thornton). The spookiness of Jason’s conversations with his brother doesn’t become apparent until midpoint through the play’s progress–this is perhaps the biggest flaw of Gift Theatre’s production or Hinderaker’s play. Stronger foreshadowing of Jason’s true relationship with Tommy is necessary for greater impact. Also, a clearer sense of Jason’s edginess would also lend veracity to his final intentions in the play’s last 15 minutes.

But, as a general rule, Suicide, Incorporated is not about family bonds—it’s about life under a business model, wherein the company of men becomes your real family, whether you want it to or not. All work and no play, that’s the quintessence of Jason’s character—stereotypically forming stronger bonds with the people he works with, or serves at work, rather than with his own flesh and blood. Lucky for the audience, Jason’s growing relationship with new customer Norm makes for the real backbone of the show.

Thornton’s performance as Norm is immaculate; every tic and pause perfectly timed—an actor’s showcase of steady, low-key, precise technique. Such an accurate portrayal makes Norm’s confession about how he ruined the love 89of his life simultaneously bizarre and eerily truthful. “How did I become one of those guys?” Norm asks; the lone guy you thought could never hurt a fly, the lone guy who loses his newlywed wife by stalking her. It’s a masterpiece of characterization.

All these lonely men—where do they all come from? That was the question I was forced to ask myself at the close of Suicide, Incorporated. If Hindraker’s play holds any water, then it seems that they all come from business school or from workplaces that barely feed their souls or even lets them know that they have souls to feed–or lives worth living outside the workplace. It’s only a one-act, but what goes missing the most from the play is the acknowledgement that these male characters were never encouraged to be whole to begin with. Once they have lost someone vitally important to them, yet existing outside the business model, will they ever get a real chance to be whole again?

  
  
Rating: ★★★
   
   

Showtimes are Thursdays and Fridays, and Saturdays at 7:30pm with Sunday matinees at 2:30.

Featuring Gift Artistic Director and ABC’s Private Practice’s Michael Patrick Thornton with guest artists Josh Rollins, Mike Harvey, Ed Flynn, Jay Worthington and Jim Farruggio.

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REVIEW: Almost, Maine (The Gift Theatre)

Gift Theatre creates a real charm offensive

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The Gift Theatre presents:

Almost, Maine

 [a special dinner/theatre event]

by John Cariani
directed by Barlag, Belcuore, Blandford, Branham, Dibo, Gawlik, and Jones
featuring: Dan Aho, Burfete, DiNicola, Emmons, Jim Farruggio, Ed Flynn, Aemilia Scott, Justine Serino, and Kyle Zornes
through February 21st
(more info)

review by Paige Listerud

Much about John Cariani’s play, Almost, Maine, mirrors Jules Feiffer’s 1977 play Hold Me!  Both are collections of light, comical sketches regarding the uncertainties of the human heart. The essential difference between them is that the poignant neuroticism of Feiffer’s work grounds itself in the daily struggles of urban—okay, New York City—existence, while John Cariani situates his characters in the benignly rural and utterly imaginary location of Almost, Maine.

securedownload So, Fieffer’s characters fret, not only over their past or latest or lack of personal relationships, but also the political and social uneasiness of their times. By contrast, Cariani’s small town residents exist far, far, far away; not just from anything resembling everyday concerns—quite a thing to think about in a play emerging from 2004—but also reality itself. All the struggles of falling in and out of love dominate the minds of Almost’s inhabitants as if there were nothing else going on in the world. Moreover, the play steps further from reality in the literal use of sight gags based on our clichéd idioms about love.

All of which would be a treacly mess in less proficient hands. But Gift Theatre Company’s numerous directors and actors demonstrate a delicate, persistent care for the material, eliciting every critical ounce of human sympathy from the moment. The pain of abandonment or loss receives the wry and gentle touch called for by the text. Humor is almost born, not from the lines, but in the space between the lines as characters contend with what direction to go in the pursuit of romance. In the process, Capriani’s deeper wit about the precariousness of creating or preserving love shines through. It’s a magical place, Almost, Maine—but magical places can be as dangerous as the real ones. Almost is fraught with the possibility of losing one’s big chance at love, even when it is staring you in the face.

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Since the play has such a short run—and only for benefit purposes–GTC hadn’t planned to have it reviewed. Too bad, they’re getting a good review anyway. At the very least, Almost, Maine is a real charm offensive, a solid showcase for cast and crew. Plus, if it’s perfectly timed to be “date theater” for the masses this Valentine’s Day, at least it’s a work about love that both is and is not about the happy ending.

 

Rating: ★★★

 


THE DINNER:

A four course Northeastern Seafood Dinner For Two @

The Gale Street Inn

  • Crabcake Appetizer
  • New England Chowder
  • Lobster And Mussel Clam Bake For Two
  • Cranberry Cheesecake

Production and dinner are only available as a coupled event:

“The Seafood Duet”
A Very Special Event Generously Sponsored by The Gale Street Inn
To Benefit The Gift Theatre Company

Dinner For Two at Gale Street Inn + Tickets for Two to The Gift = $75.

A Value of $60 for Your Meal + A Value of $50 for Your Tickets = Sweet!
Tax, Tip, Beverage Not Included.
A Non-Seafood Substitute Menu Will Be Available Upon Request.
Sorry, No Refunds.  Exchanges Subject to Seating Availability.

Please give yourselves plenty of time to savor and enjoy your meal before the show! Patrons also enjoy the freedom to park their car in Gale Street’s lot!

For Evening Performances:
Please plan on being seated at Gale Street by 6:00pm and no later than 6:30pm.

For Matinee Performances:
Dinner served after the show starting around 4:30pm.
Before the show, please plan on being seated by 1:00pm.

As a courtesy to you, the audience, and the actors, there is no late seating at The Gift.

For tickets call (773) 283-7071, or
BUY ONLINE!
View Reservation Policies