Review: Always, Patsy Cline (Fox Valley Repertory)

     
     

Patsy not the star of her own show

     
    

Megan Long as Patsy Cline. Photo by Trademan Photography

  
Fox Valley Repertory presents
  
Always, Patsy Cline
  
Created by Ted Swindley
Directed by John Gawlik
at Pheasant Run Resort, St. Charles (map)
through May 15  |  tickets: $29-$39  |  more info

Reviewed by Dan Jakes

Fox Valley Repertory performs Ted Swindley’s musical tribute to the late country music darling Patsy Cline through a haze, literally and figuratively. For one, generational, tertiary colored lights penetrate fog above the stage, making for a nice effect not unlike watching a “Lawrence Welk” type television show on an analog set. The edges around the singers and band are softened, and the space is filled with nostalgic ambiance.

The other haze is selective memory.

Whatever events that caused the lonely heartbreak that drives Cline’s most moving songs—listen to “Faded Love, ” for god’s sake—as well as the struggles she suffered attaining her success are left deep in the background. No, the stakes in Swindley’s play couldn’t be lower, but one gets the sense that’s where he wants them. Always, Patsy Cline is inspired by the real life letters kept between Cline (Megan Long) Megan Long as Patsy Cline in Fox Valley Rep's 'Always, Patsy Cline'. Photo by Trademan Photography.and her close friend Louise Steger (Kate Brown), and just like pouring over the letters of a departed friend, he only wants us to remember what was good. Cline’s actual biography is a tragic story of a legendary artist dying in a senseless accident at 30. Director John Gawlik’s show is the recounting of a friendship and the joy that carries on after someone passes.

We’re first introduced to Patsy in boots at the Grand Ol Oprey, with Louise miles away seated in a Lucy Chair in her kitchen. Listening to Cline sparks a bit of a love affair in Steger, and she quickly closes the gap.

As the narrator and primary means of moving the play’s light plot forward, Brown is engaging and affable. She makes a balanced duo with Megan Long, countering Long’s authoritative pettiness with broad shoulders, an admiration for cigarettes and coffee, and an unabashed willingness to wiggles, shake, and slap her tuckus. Getting the mostly older audience at Fox Valley Rep to actively engage can be a process akin to pulling dentures teeth, but Brown actually gets a few of them to their feet.

Cline, on the other hand, is written to be viewed from a distance. Long shines in the music numbers with her strong voice and well-trained little yodels and yips, but she’s given little opportunity to be the star any place else. Perhaps the playwright is trying attain some sense of mystique for the title-character. Trouble is, that choice forces Brown’s character to continually grab for exposition instead of action to tell the story about a friendship, and leaves our deep connection to their relationship out of reach.

  
  
Rating: ★★½
 
 

Kate Brown as narrating friend Louise Steger and Megan Long as Patsy Cline in Fox Valey Rep's "Always, Patsy Cline". Photo by Trademan Photography. Megan Long as Patsy Cline. Photo by Tradman Photography

Always, Patsy Cline: The Sweetest Musical This Side of Heaven runs through May 15th at Pheasant Run Resort, with performances Fridays and Saturdays at 8pm, Sundays at 2pm, with selective Thursdays either 8pm or 2pm.  Tickets are $29-$39 (dinner package: $49), and can be purchased online or by calling (630) 584-6342.  More info at www.foxvalleyrep.org.

All photos by Trademan Photography

     
     

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Gift Theatre offers holiday show, extends ‘Lonesome West’

  
  

Gift Theatre ends 2010 with holiday play, ‘Lonesome West’ extension

  
  

The Lonesome West - Gift Theatre

Written by Allegra Gallian

The Gift Theatre is a Chicago-based theatre company situated in the north-west city neighborhood of Jefferson Park, taking the form an intimate 50-seat storefront space located at located at 4802 N Milwaukee Ave.

Map picture

The Gift Theatre Company, whose mission is to tell great stories on stage with honesty and simplicity, has been producing shows since 2001 with their premiere production of Boy’s Life. The company, led by Artistic Director Michael Patrick Thornton, has been consistently producing shows at their home location and around the city each year since then.

Most recently their 2010 season included One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest (review ★★½), Suicide, Incorporated (review ★★★), The Lonesome West (review ★★★) – and they celebrate the season with Get Behind Me, Santa! And The Lonesome West , directed by Sheldon Patinkin, has been so well received by both audiences and critics alike, it has been extended for another 5 weeks, now closing January 30, 2011!

Get Behind Me, Santa! is a two-act comedy performance using both sketch comedy and improv taking on all things holiday-related. Poking fun at everything from tacky sweaters to Yule logs and everything in between, The Gift Theatre Company partnered with the Gale Street Inn to bring a little extra cheer and good tidings to the city.

The Gift Theatre Company also celebrates the season every Wednesday and Friday with Natural Gas performed by the cast of Santa’s Great American Depression Holiday Show, America! The show offers 50 minutes of holiday amusement.

     
Josh Rollins and Mike Harvey - Gift Theatre Gift Theatre - Cuckoo Nest

Not only does the company continue to produce theatre, but they produce film as well under the name of giftFILM, led by artistic directors Kenny Mihlfried and John Kelly Connolly. Part of giftFILM’s mission is to, according the company’s Web site, “produce short and feature-length films and videos, primarily (but not exclusively) written, directed, and performed by ensemble or company members of the Gift Theatre Company, and to actively encourage an ongoing collaborative relationship between theater and filmmaking communities of the city of Chicago and surrounding areas.”

For more information see the Web site at http://www.thegifttheatre.org/.

 

VIDEO: Behind the scenes at Lonesome West, featuring Michael Patrick Thornton and John Gawlik.  Video shot by Aemilia Scott and Tom Blanford, edited by Aemilia Scott.

  
 

REVIEW: The Lonesome West (The Gift Theatre)

  
  

Laughs and loneliness in the Irish countryside

 

 Lonesome West

  
The Gift Theatre presents
   
The Lonesome West
  
Written by Martin McDonagh
Directed by Sheldon Patinkin 
at
The Gift Theatre, 4802 N. Milwaukee (map)
through Dec. 19  |  tickets: $20-$30  |  more info 

Reviewed by Barry Eitel

There’s something oddly Midwestern about Martin McDonagh’s depiction of the Irish hamlet Leenane. There are a few scenic landscapes and a ton of boredom. Perhaps that’s why Chicagoans react so well to his homicide-riddled plays. Even though we’re oceans apart from Connemara, something seemed very familiar in The Gift Theatre’s production of The Lonesome West. I believe I’m less inclined to murder, but the monotony of Valene’s and Coleman’s existence is definitely relatable.

The Lonesome West is part of a loose “Connemara trilogy” of plays set in the West Irish hills, the other being Beauty Queen of Leenane (which Gift put up a few years back) and A Skull in Connemara. Although Lonesome West has much less stage blood than many other McDonagh’s plays, it’s still rife with violence. Two brothers (masterfully portrayed here by John Gawlik and John Kelly Connolly) bicker constantly over just about everything, from money to bags of chips. Frequently, the spats boil Lonesome West2 over into armed duels. The brothers’ relationship causes plenty of heartache for the local priest, Father Welsh (Paul D’Addario), who is already wracked by oodles of Catholic guilt and alcoholism. The quartet of characters is rounded out by Girleen (Brittany Burch, who makes a terrific Chicago debut), a girl who might be jailbait, but could also be much more sentimental.

Probably the most striking aspect of the production is the fiery dynamic between Gawlik, who plays the wrathful Coleman, and Connolly, who portrays the miserly Valene. Lonesome West a great example of a play which comes off much different on the stage as opposed to the page. Gawlik and Connolly are tip-toeing towards middle age, which makes the childish infighting of Valene and Coleman feel especially pathetic. When merely reading McDonagh’s text, this doesn’t particularly jump out, it’s easy to forget the character’s ages when they act so immature. But Gawlik and Connolly force out the characters’ pettiness, the major driving force for the production.

Obviously, Gawlik and Connolly have much more than their age going for them. The duo has an engaging chemistry. They can barely hide their glee as the two brothers one-up each other. Gawlik is able to mine dark, vicious depths for a truly spiteful Coleman. Connolly, on the other hand, finds the grubby greediness of a five-year-old.

D’Addario, a Gift favorite, gives another great performance. He comes off as essentially Catholic, sickened and saddened by what he sees around him, but unsure about how to proceed (which, in turn, leads to more guilt). Through Lonesome West, McDonagh joins the leagues of Irish writers before him that comment and struggle with the dominant faith of their island. In the semi-mystical style that modern Celtic playwrights love, the play basically becomes about the damnation of souls, a spectacular turn that works despite seeming destructively heavy. D’Addario is a big part of making the plot churn forward, and he is successful.

Along with D’Addario, the story wouldn’t work without the solid performance of Burch. At first, her Girleen just seems like silly, flirtatious eye candy, but the character’s complex layers shine through as the production progresses. In fact, my favorite scene is the one without the brothers. Halfway through the piece, D’Addario and Burch share a stage alone and the outcome is electric, dripping with loneliness and desperation.

Sheldon Patinkin’s direction shows a smart understanding of the tumultuous relationships that McDonagh writes so well. The first half is uneven, slack in pacing and the cast seems a little timid. It takes until after intermission for the show to start shooting sparks. Once everything snaps together, the production flies. For a show often billed as a black comedy, there’s a hefty amount of heart.

   
   
Rating: ★★★
   
   

Noble Fool Theatre changes name, announces new season

 

 

Artistic Director John Gawlik shares his thoughts on name change

 

Noble Fool Theatricals, the well-established professional theater in the Fox Valley area, has announced a new direction for their nonprofit organization. Beginning their calendar year season in January 2011, Noble Fool will become Fox Valley Repertory; a name that represents the community they have grown their mission, vision, patron base, and academy students around.

I assure you that you can still count on outstanding productions because we are not a new organization. Our staff is the same, dedicated team,” says Artistic Director John Gawlik. “But after several years of growth, we simply wanted our name to represent the strong bond we have created with our patrons and community. We know this will help our patrons connect with our stories and begin referencing us as ‘our theater’ even more.”

As the nonprofit theater company in residence at Pheasant Run Resort for the seventh year, “we are focused on creating an engaging theater experience by producing shows that inspire our community to laugh, reflect and reconnect to moments in one’s life,” says Artistic Director John Gawlik. A major portion of their commitment is through arts education, as they continue their task of inspiring youth to explore their own lives through the performing arts.

For Fox Valley Repertory’s 2011 season, Gawlik has programmed an exciting season with some of the top and emerging directors in Chicago.

To celebrate our new vision and name, we are offering the best subscription rates and benefits in the area,” says Gawlik. “Our 4-show packages are heavily discounted at $65 and $80 per person. We’re hoping the Fox Valley area will join us with this great introductory price. Our number of subscribers has grown tremendously in the last two years, and we hope this continues.”


Fox Valley Repertory’s 2011 Season

 

January 20 – March 13, 2011

Leaving Iowa

The Comedy About Family Vacations

By Tim Clue and Spike Manton
Directed by Rachel Rockwell; named Chicago Magazine’s Director of the Year (2010).

   
  Middle-aged writer Don Browning is searching for the perfect spot to scatter his father’s ashes. As he travels the paths his family took on their annual vacations, images of his father and the shared family tortures surround his memories. This homegrown comedy will have you revisiting your fond (and not-so-fond) memories of your youth.
   
   

March 24 – May 15, 2011

Always, Patsy Cline

‘The Sweetest Musical This Side of Heaven’

Directed by John Gawlik; director of The Gift Theatre’s The Ruby Sunrise, named one of the Top Ten shows of 2009 by TimeOut Chicago Magazine 

   
  More than just a tribute to the late legendary country singer, this Off-Broadway musical recounts Cline’s true friendship with a fan from Houston, whom she befriended at a Texas honky tonk and remained pen pals with until her early death. Complete with down home country humor and true emotion, this 1960s tribute includes many of Patsy’ unforgettable hits such as Crazy, I Fall to Pieces, Sweet Dreams and Waking
After Midnight. Rating: PG
   
   

June 9 – July 31, 2011

Around the World in 80 Days

A Classic Adventure Comedy

Written for the stage by Mark Brown, from the novel by Jules Verne

Directed by John Gawlik 

   
  Based on Jules Verne’s classic novel, join fearless adventurer Phileas Fogg as he sets out to circle the globe in an unheard-of 80 days. It’s a race against the clock as he contends stampeding elephants, raging typhoons, bandits, and a detective who thinks he’s a robber on the run. Danger, romance, and comic surprises abound in this whirlwind of a show as five actors portray 39 characters in seven continents.
   
   

August 18 – October 9, 2011

They’re Playing Our Song

Book by Neil Simon; Music by Marvin Hamlisch; Lyrics by Carole Bayer Sager

Directed by Jonathan Berry, hailed as “one of Chicago’s most talented young directors” by Chicago Tribune. 

   
  When an award-winning, straight-laced composer teams up with a quirky, aspiring lyricist, it’s far from a match made in musical heaven. But when an unexpected romance builds between them, they hilariously struggle to find harmony. Based on the real life love story of Marvin Hamlisch and Carole Bayer Sager, Neil Simon’s romantic musical will leave a smile on your face and a song in your heart. Rating: PG
   
   

July 7 – August 7, 2011

Bad Dates

A Woman’s Quest for Love and the Perfect Pair of Shoes

By Theresa Rebeck

Directed by Kimberly Senior, one of Chicago’s most acclaimed directors. 

   
  If you like “Sex and the City” and Bridget Jones’ Diary, you’ll love this romantic one-woman comedy! Single mom and Texas transplant Haley Walker tries to balance the pressures of her new NYC restaurant career, raising a moody teenage daughter, and the too-close-for-comfort relationship with the Romanian mob, all while trying to find her way back into the dating scene…nothing that a great pair of shoes couldn’t fix! Haley needs your shoulder to cry and laugh on as she shares her dating adventures with you.
   
   

Collider 2011: New Play Project

A new play program partnering local scientists and Fox Valley Repertory in developing new works that help us better understand the universe and who we are, while illuminating and celebrating the worlds of art, science and technology.

Big Bang Ten Minute Plays

World premier ten minute plays will be performed during the Fox Valley Rep Summer Arts Fest.

Other Fox Valley Repertory Productions

 

October 14 – 30, 2011

The Woman in Black

A Spine-Chilling Tale

Special Halloween Eve Performance on Sunday, October 30 @ 7pm!

By Stephen Malatratt.  Based on the novel by Susan Hill

   
  A London lawyer hires an actor to help recount a story to family and friends that has long troubled him since he attended the funeral of an elderly recluse. During the reenactment, you’ll be gripping your seats with a chill down your spine as you experience the horror and terror of this haunting tale. We just hope you’ll live to retell the tale of one of the longest-running suspense thrillers in history. Rating: PG-13
   
   

November 10 – December 24, 2011

It’s a Wonderful Life

A Live Radio Play 

   
  Inspired by Frank Capra’s beloved American holiday classic, you’ll become a part of a 1940s live broadcast as actors bring the fateful story of George Bailey to life. As a studio audience member, you’ll relive the beloved tale of regret and redemption complete with classic holiday songs, a six member Children’s choir, instruments, man-made sound effects, and live commercials.
   
   

Other Performances

In addition to these performances, Fox Valley Repertory will be producing five youth ensemble musical performances, four holiday productions, and presenting six live music events and four national comedy touring acts – together, totaling to 251 performances during the 2011 season.

Ticket Information

Pheasant Run Resort is located at 4051 E. Main St., St. Charles, IL. Season subscriptions start at $65 for show only tickets (discounted dinner-show subscriptions also available) and are currently available by calling call the Box Office at 630-584-6342. Full priced single tickets for each production will go on sale at a later date.

Additional information on the 2011 Season and Noble Fool Theatricals soon-to-be Fox Valley Repertory are available at http://www.noblefool.org or www.foxvalleyrep.org.

      
     

Theater Thursday: Red Herring at Pheasant Run Resort

Thursday, September 9

Red Herring by Michael Hollinger

Noble Fool Theatricals at Pheasant Run Resort 

4501 E. Main St., St. Charles

 

redherringCome to Jambalaya before the show to enjoy hot spinach dip, cheese, crackers and a special Sparking Red Sangria cocktail by the resort’s New Orleans-inspired restaurant. Then stay for the murder mystery comedy Red Herring, followed by a post-show Q&A with Director John Gawlik. Pre-show party, show, and post-show discussion take place within the resort; free parking. Three love stories, a murder mystery, and a nuclear espionage…oh my! It’s 1952: America’s on the verge of the H-bomb, Dwight Eisenhower’s on the campaign trail, and I Love Lucy’s on Monday nights. Meanwhile, Senator Joe McCarthy’s daughter just got engaged to a Soviet spy, and Boston detective Maggie Pelletier has to find out who dumped the dead guy in the Harbor-or else lose out on a honeymoon in Havana. A blunt-nosed, sharp-eyed look at love and tying (and untying, and retying) the knot.

Event begins at 7 p.m.  Show begins at 8 p.m.    Tickets: $15

For reservations call 630.584.6342 and mention "Theater Thursdays."

  
  

REVIEW: Sketchbook X (Collaboraction)

Collaboraction celebrates the creative spirit with Sketchbook X

 Pictured (left to right): Beth Stelling, Maari Suorsa, Mary Hollis Inboden and Meg Johns in The New Colony Ensemble’s world premiere “Five Lesbians Eating a Quiche,” one of the 19 original short works in SKETCHBOOK  X, a mixed media festival of theatre, music and video presented by Collaboraction, now in its 10th year. The show runs through June 27, 2010 at The Chopin Theatre. http://www.collaboraction.org

   
Collaboraction presents
   
Sketchbook X:   People’s Choice
   
at Chopin Theatre, 1543 W. Division (map)
through June 27th  |  tickets: $20-$35   |  more info

reviewed by Keith Ecker 

What is a play exactly? Is it a dramatic staging of a story? Is it people moving around in a physical space in front of an audience? And furthermore, what separates a play from a sketch or a scene or even a performance art installation?

Pictured (left to right): Jeffrey Gitelle, Ian McLaren and Emily Shain in “Eighty Four” written by Cory Tamler, directed by Dan Stermer. “Eighty Four” is one of the 19 original short works in SKETCHBOOK  X, a mixed media festival of theatre, music and video presented by Collaboraction, now in its 10th year. The show runs through June 27 at The Chopin Theatre These are the questions I was left pondering after seeing Collaboraction’s tenth annual Sketchbook festival, a showcase of original mixed media performances. This  year’s theme was “exponential.” Yes, it is fairly nebulous, and this is perhaps one reason why the output lacks a certain concreteness and cohesion. Characters and plot become secondary to evoking visceral emotions. Sketchbook X in many ways is more circus than drama.

This isn’t to say that the finished product is all spectacle and no substance. There are some standout pieces.

The one that clearly stands out the most is Five Lesbians Eating a Quiche. Unlike other pieces that become crushed under their own weight, Five Lesbians is a witty, stylized comedy. Devised by Evan Linder, the play features five women (Sarah Gitenstein, Mary Hollis Inboden, Beth Stelling, Maari Suorsa and Megan Johns) who head a local social club centered around a shared love of quiche. The women click and cluck like 1950s southern church ladies and harass the audience. When communist Russia bombs the outside world, all quiche is destroyed. The women go into a tizzy, which leads to their outings.

Five Lesbians works because it is the most refined piece of the festival. The script feels fully fleshed out, the actors are well aware of their characters and the comedic timing is impeccable. There is a lot of commitment, and there is little ambiguity. It has an aesthetic all its own that is so engaging I’d pay to see a full-length production.

Pictured (left to right): Beth Stelling, Maari Suorsa, Mary Hollis Inboden and Meg Johns in The New Colony Ensemble’s world premiere “Five Lesbians Eating a Quiche,” one of the 19 original short works in SKETCHBOOK  X, a mixed media festival of theatre, music and video presented by Collaboraction, now in its 10th year. The show runs through June 27, 2010 at The Chopin Theatre

Other standouts include Sacrebleu (devised and performed by Dean Evans, Molly Plunk and Anthony Courser), a pantomimed, slapstick comedy about two eccentric French fur trappers. The short monologue The Blueberry (written by Sean Graney and featuring Celeste Januszewski) is a thoughtful meditation on existence that explains string theory with blueberry imagery.

Other pieces, however, just don’t pan out. What I’m Looking For (written by Brett C. Leonard and featuring Joel Gross and Heather Bodie) is little more than a heavy-handed music video for a Rufus Wainwright song. Meanwhile, The Untimely Death of  Adolf Hitler (written by Andy Grigg and featuring Eddie Karch, Anthony Moseley, Erin Myers, Greg Hardigan and Dan Krall) lacks enough wit to drive the piece beyond its premise. But you can’t expect all the pieces to be gems. Besides, if you don’t like something, just wait 7 to 10 minutes for another play.

Sketchbook-Four-Women As usual, Collaboraction has succeeded in making the festival feel like a big event. The interior of the Chopin Theatre is awash in glowing light and fog. Two large screens flank the sides of the stage and streamers stretch from the floor to the ceiling. It all makes for a breath-taking first impression.

If you want to see all 19 pieces in a row, you’ll have to see the show on a Saturday. Be warned, though. It’s a 4.5-hour long journey, though you are encouraged to come and go as you please.

Overall, Sketchbook X is a mixed bag of intriguing works. The majority of the pieces lack refinement, but there are a few plays that are polished treasures. The theme gets lost among the many productions, but I don’t think that’s the point. Rather, Sketchbook is more of a party that aims to celebrate the creative spirit, and in that sense, it succeeds.

   
   
Rating:  ★★★
   
   

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More extensions: Bailiwick and Noble Fool

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“Show Us Your Love” extended through the end of March

Bailiwick Chicago’s cabaret hit has been extended through the end of this month – Sunday, March 28th, to be exact.  You can catch Show Us Your Love, at Mary’s Attic, every Sunday evening at 7:30pm.  For tickets and more information, go to www.BailiwickChicago.com


overtavern
Noble Fool Theatricals has extended their popular family comedy Over the Tavern through April 3rd (our review  ★★½).  Directed by John Gawlik at the Pheasant Run Resort Mainstage Theater (4051 E. Main, St. Charles) Over The Tavern was originally scheduled to close on March 28, 2010, but now has added two additional performances  – April 2nd and 3rd.  For tickets or more information, visit www.noblefool.org or call the box-office at 630-584-6342.

The cast for Over the Tavern includes Alex Adams, Scott Cummins, Gabriel
Harder, Renee Matthews, Stacy Stoltz, Katrina Syrris and Dan Velisek.