Wednesday Wordplay: make good shit

Motivational Quotes

When you give each other everything, it becomes an even trade. Each wins all.
            — Lois McMaster Bujold, A Civil Campaign, 1999

The only way to last a really long time is to build something useful enough that people will want to keep it going after you die, and to cultivate a sense of ownership in other people. In short: make good shit and give it away as fast as you can.
            — Lisa Williams, The Lessons of Nixon, 05-19-06

An author spends months writing a book, and maybe puts his heart’s blood into it, and then it lies about unread till the reader has nothing else in the world to do.
            — W. Somerset Maugham, The Razor’s Edge, 1943

To love is to receive a glimpse of heaven.
    
       — Karen Sunde

How can you come to know yourself? Never by thinking, always by doing. Try to do your duty, and you’ll know right away what you amount to.
            — Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

Even with the best of maps and instruments, we can never fully chart our journeys.
            — Gail Pool

All a good letter has to do is make you feel special.
            — Takayuki Ikkaku, Arisa Hosaka and Toshihiro Kawabata


 

The T/D deletion

(who knew there was such a thing?)

In Mark Liberman’s Language Log, he discusses how the expression “baked goods” is increasingly being rendered “bake goods,” as a result of t/d deletion – a linguistic process by which the suffix “ed” is deleted. Although stigmatized, the t/d deletion is a common progressive occurrence in American English, at least in some contexts. As a result, fixed expressions that start out as participle+noun sometimes evolve into the loss of their “ed” ending. Past examples that occurred long ago include:

  • ice(d) cream
  • skim(med) milk
  • pop(ped) corn
  • wax(ed) paper

More recently, the t/d deletion has held sway with ice(d) tea, cream(ed) corn, and whip(ped) cream.

Read more about this phenomenon here.

 

A “Hella”byte????

Scientists are lobbying for the creation of a word to describe numbers larger than 1,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000: A campaign for” hella” to join the likes of “kilo,” “mega” and “giga” as an internationally accepted prefix is attracting growing support..