Review: Terminus (Abbey Theatre – MCA Stage)

 
   

Ireland’s best takes to the MCA stage

  
  

Declan Conlon, Catherine Walker, Olwen Fouere - Terminus

  
Abbey Theatre, i/a/w Goodman Theatre presents
  
Terminus
  
Written and Directed by Mark O’Rowe
at
Museum of Contemporary Art Stage, 220 E. Chicago (map)
through March 6  |  tickets: $28-$35  |  more info

Reviewed by Oliver Sava

The monologue is a difficult thing to master, both in terms of writing and performance, so I was a little wary when I found out Terminus is only three intertwining monologues. Luckily, Abbey Theatre, the national theater of Ireland, knows how to transform the monologue into riveting theater, as Mark O’Rowe’s poetry is exquisitely performed by the three actors. Standing inside a shattered picture frame, giant shards of glass surrounding them, A (Olwen Fouéré), B (Catherine Walker), and C (Declan Conlon) recount the events of one evening that will change them forever.

A, an emergency hotline operator, explores seedy Dublin pubs as she looks for an ex-student who is trying to abort a child nearly come to term. When a night out goes horribly wrong, B finds herself face to face with the supernatural, and loves what she sees. And C cuts people up without any remorse, so he’s a bit of a wild card in the proceedings. O’Rowe’s evocative language uses rhyme liberally, giving the monologues a bit of a freestyle rap vibe that helps keep the momentum constantly moving forward. O’Rowe is an immensely skilled playwright, and he creates a bleak image of Dublin that is both intensely alive while horrifyingly decayed. The verse allows him to present information in new ways, creating images in segments to build suspense until the big comedic/dramatic reveal.

Catherine Walker, Declan Conlon, Olwen Fouere - TerminusConsidering how serious the subject matter is, O’Rowe’s script is very funny, albeit darkly. There’s a Bette Midler through-line in all the stories that lends itself to comedy but takes on a dark meaning in the context of the plot, and finding the comedy in the midst of all this darkness is why the script is so successful. His characters may speak in verse, but their speech is natural, and the language flows very comfortably from all three actors, who have the unenviable task of keeping an audiences attention on their own. There’s a strength between the three actors that has undoubtedly comes from their time spent in rehearsal, and the connection between them can be felt throughout the entire play, uniting them despite their separate stories.

O’Rowe doesn’t have the same problems as other writer-directors, and that’s because Terminus is a tightly constructed production that doesn’t over-conceptualize or complicate the script with directorial flourishes. The ambition of this play is in it’s script, and the actors turn in beautifully nuanced performances that capture all the ecstasy, terror, and heartbreak of urban life. Often cringe-inducing in its explicitness, O’Rowe’s script is a grim and graphic image of Dublin life, but the poetry of the langue finds the beauty hidden within the darkness of the city’s soul. I didn’t know what to expect from Ireland’s national theater, and now I know not to expect anything less than brilliance.

  
  
Rating: ★★★½
   
  

All photos by Ros Kavanagh