Sunday Sondheim: A Weekend in the Country

I think this first-act finale is one of the finest writing Sondheim has every done.  From A Little Night Music, here’s Beverly Lambert, Michel Maguire, Maureen Moore, Regina Resnik, Kevin Anderson, Susan Terry and Danielle Ferland -  among other cast members – performing “A Weekend in the Country” at the Lincoln Center, 1990.

Sunday Sondheim: Every Day a Little Death

Maureen Moore and Beverly Lambert performed this amazing song in New York Opera’s production of Stephen Sondheim‘s A Little Night Music in 1990.

 

 

Comments of interest on YouTube:

I have probably never seen a more perfect performance of a Sondheim song. From her inflections to her noticing every assonance, every parallel, every nuance, especially the h of "horses" and "whores", as well as her glance shifting at "and I do". I’ve also never heard a more perfect delivery of the word "disgusting". All this with her voice & the subtlety of her expression, which is almost always fixed. Absolutely brilliant, and one of my favorite songs by the greatest songwriter of all time.

I…..believe that (Stephen Sondheim) being gay gives over to more sensitivities than straight men, especially when it comes to relationships with men. I don’t think that this discounts his intelligence or honesty. He is more perceptive to how it feels to be mistreated by a man than a straight man would be.

Sondheim is intelligent and honest, that’s why we he writes the way he does – NOT because he likes men. By your reasoning, all women should be able to write this way… so your statement is faulty.

I…disagree. Women and men can mistreat one another the same ways. But I believe Sondheim has actually not had much of a love life – he spoke about it very recently. For decades he was without a partner. One can learn enough [if not more] through friends and the understanding of human nature. And that’s why I mentioned his intelligence. If anything, that could be an attribute to his ability to present emotions the way he does. Most tend to shield their words.