Unleash the Rhino!! (a festivus for the restofus)

  
 

Okay, Chicago theatergoers, time to get your fringe on

  
  

klutenyfinal

Written by Paige Listerud

Curious Theatre Branch opened its 22nd Annual Rhinoceros Theatre Festival this past Friday, January 14th, drawing hundreds of avant-garde theater artists from around the country to showcase over 20 off-beat and experimental works and performances at the Prop Theatre space. Curious Theatre remounts Sarah Kane’s critically acclaimed 4:48 Psychosis under the direction of Beau O’Reilly, plus an adaptation of Gertrude Stein’s little known play, Mexico. Expect mind-opening and consciousness-bending theater experiences from School for Designing a Society, Deja Links, Strange Lupus, BoyGirlBoyGirl, The Whiskey Rebellion and many, many more.

“We’ve struck an interesting balance between past and future with this festival,” explains Beau O’Reilly. “We decided to accept Deja Links—they’re a continuation of Club Lower Links which Leigh Jones ran in the 1990s. Even though Rhino Fest began around the same time, they’re really pre-Rhino and a lot of performance art was generated out of there. It’s where Ira Glass and David Sedaris got started. So, we have a significant number of people represented from that period—older artists doing some very mature and complete work, like Lisa Fay and Jeff Glassman Duo and then, of course, we showcase some student work from the SAIC and full-length work from young writers.”

Curious Theatre also kicked off the Fest with a benefit opening night–the Full Moon Vaudeville, hosted by Curious and the Crooked Mouth String Band.

psychosis


 

Rhino Festival Schedule

for more information, visit the Rhino Festival website

All tickets $12 in advance, $15 at the door  |  Buy tickets  |   See calendar.

 

Curious Theatre Branch presents

4:48 Psychosis

By Sarah Kane

Sarah Kane’s last play returns in a critically acclaimed production directed by Beau O’Reilly.

The play charts the journey from life into death, from darkness into light, from pain into love.Spiked with gallous humor, the play charts the journey from life into death, from darkness into light, from pain into love. Talk back / post show panel discussion with director John Moletress, the cast and crew and invited guest speakers (TBA).Spiked with gallous humor, the play charts the journey from life into death, from darkness into light, from pain into love Spiked with gallous humor, the play charts the journey from life into death, from darkness into light, from pain into loveSpiked with gallous humor, the play charts the journey from life into death, from darkness into light, from pain into love

Performance Dates: Friday, January, 14, 21, 28, February 4, 11.  All dates at 7pm


School for Designing A Society presents

10 to 4

directed by Susan Parenti

An acoustic play which twists shards of political activism and thought’s aging into the brain of language.

Saturday, January 29 and Sunday, January 30 at 7pm


Lisa Fay & Jeff Glassman Duo presents

Currency

Dense theater shorts in which ‘natural-looking’ behavior is subjected to contortions, subversions and convolutions, letting ‘natural’ show its socially constructed face.

Friday, January 21, Saturday, January 22 and Sunday, January 23 at 7pm

  
  

See the rest of the schedule after the jump.

  
  

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REVIEW: Casanova Takes a Bath (Theater Oobleck)

From Frivolous Flings to Serious Finances

casanova

   
Theater Oobleck presents
   
Casanova Takes a Bath
   
Written and performed by David Isaacson
at
Prop Thtr, 3502 N. Elston (map)
through June 13th  |  tickets: $12 donation  |  more info

reviewed by Paige Listerud

David Isaacson’s one-man show, Casanova Takes a Bath, passes itself off as something as light and whipped as blanc mange. His sartorial transformation from modern-day satirist to Giacomo Casanova takes place by means of a few articles of clothing ransacked from his wife’s closet. The bareness of the studio stage at Prop Theatre contains only a blackboard, a stack of newspapers, and an antique music stand with its own stack of papers—Isaacson’s script. Complete with bare-bones lighting design (Martha Bayne), Isaacson’s examination of our current financial crisis, from the perspective of the world’s greatest lover, adherences to the utmost minimal of minimalist theatre principles.

How economical. How unlike the shenanigans of Wall Street financiers, the shenanigans of free-market advocates of deregulation, the blind faith of defenders of “the efficient markets hypothesis,” and those who still believe that math will always represent accurate reality. These dreamers, these practitioners of “creative economics,” these “masters of the universe” only use their various economic jargons to hide those tendencies that mirror the wanton habits of the protagonist of Isaacson’s show. Casanova becomes, for us, the expert to turn to precisely because own his financial profligacy was equal to his perpetual, serial, sexual debauchery.

And why not? When modern day financial instruments and credit default swaps begins to resemble the impulsive gambling schemes of an 18th-century libertine, why shouldn’t we turn to that sly, witty, and insouciant rogue–especially when, down on his luck in prison, he is being candid about all his vices, compulsions, hair-brained money-making misadventures and sexual entrapments. Isaacson has rediscovered the perfect figure to expose us to the implications and ramifications of real-life venture capitalism. Add a little sex, an aspect of human nature that is driven by many of the same delusions and impulses as gambling with other people’s money, and you have the 21st-century financial crisis, only saucier.

But it’s not all witty euphemisms, scandalous liaisons, and weird predictions wrought from engaging in fake occult practices. No, the fun’s got to stop sometime. Isaacson is great at linking the fluff to the finance. But, while he is quite accurate when linking a moment of 18th-century shenanigan to its present-day incarnation in our financial sector, there are moments when his dry, humorous approach just doesn’t bring the hammer down hard enough, hard enough to bring home to the audience the greater perils of our current financial and political situation.

I wonder if Casanova couldn’t be a source to turn to, yet again, in order to awaken us to the deeper implications of the hole we have dug and are still digging ourselves into. Concerning his own experience of his times, Casanova reflected:

All the French ministers are the same. They lavished money which came out of the other people’s pockets to enrich their creatures, and they were absolute: The down-trodden people counted for nothing, and, through this, the indebtedness of the State and the confusion of finances were the inevitable results. A Revolution was necessary.”

Ah, yes. Revolution. Enlightenment revolution, wars for independence taking place in the context of The Enlightenment; bloody revolutions that spiral out of control and lead right on into dictatorship—at some point, all the fun and frivolity stops. Once again, because we have gambled with our future too far, the fun stops and someone gets an eye poked out or a head chopped off or somebody gets thrown into prison. I just hope it’s not me. I didn’t know anything about the financial shenanigans when they started—way back during the Reagan revolution. I just know about the dangerous outcomes; I know them because, creature of the lower orders that I am, I get to be subjected to them.

“All the French ministers are the same. They lavished money which came out of the other people’s pockets to enrich their creatures, and they were absolute: The down-trodden people counted for nothing, and, through this, the indebtedness of the State and the confusion of finances were the inevitable results. A Revolution was necessary.”     Giacomo Casanova

  
   
Rating: ★★★