Sunday Sondheim: Raul Esparza and cast sing Side By Side (from Company)

Raúl Esparza and cast sing "Side By Side By Side" from the 2006 revival of Stephen Sondheim‘s Company.  This video is an excerpt from the highly recommended 2008 PBS DVD "Company."

 

 

In 2007, Company won Tony Awards for "Best Revival of a Musical" and "Best Direction of a Musical (John Doyle)." Raúl was nominated for Best Performance by a Leading Actor in a Musical. The original 1970 production was nominated for 12 Tony awards and won 6 of them.

Interesting comment exchange

 

Ok., can someone explain why Raúl goes blank after his little kazoo bit and why he looks like he just came to a huge realization? 5 months ago

  •  

  • well, his kazoo playing was not answered by a woman; when all the other men played their instruments they were answered by a woman. 4 months ago

     

    Bobby is the eternal bachelor. Everyone had a "response" from their spouse except him (as he’s single)…the "Side By Side" and "What Would I Do Without You" aspect that is reinforced as he is beside no one… 2 months ago

     

    It’s the realization he has no one to "play against." This part of the song is a form of call and response where the husband plays first and the wife next. Bobby clearly expects someone to jump in there but no one does and it’s a continuation of Bobby’s journey into possibly entertainiing something permanent. 2 months ago

    Sunday Night Sondheim: Everybody Says Don’t

    Here’s 2 separate versions of Stephen Sondheim’s “Everybody Says Don’t” from Anyone Can Whistle.

     

     

    Regine Velasquez sings “Everybody Says Don’t”

     


     

    Lea Salonga also sings “Everybody Says Don’t”

    Goodman Theatre announces 2010-2011 Season

    goodman-facade

    It’s "The Best of All Possible"! Artistic Director Robert Falls announces Goodman Theatre’s initial five-play line-up, including two reimagined classics and three world-premiere productions (two of which are Goodman commissions) that define the theater’s new 2010/2011 season; three plays are still to be announced. The new season marks the Goodman’s 10th in its home at 170 N. Dearborn and anchor of Chicago’s revitalized North Loop Theatre District—and its 85th year as the city’s largest not-for-profit producing theater.

    Highlights:

    • Mary Zimmerman reimagines Bernstein’s Candide in a major fall musical event
    • Robert Falls re-exmines Anton Chekhov’s The Seagull
    • New works by Sarah Ruhl 
    • Major new revival of the musical masterpiece Candide by Leonard Bernstein and Hugh Wheeler

    Says Artistic Director Robert Falls:

    "Our 2010/2011 season showcases the artistic breadth and variety for which the Goodman is noted, and the quality and diversity that our state-of-the-art facility has helped us achieve over the past ten years in this incredible new home. I am particularly pleased to welcome back three of my favorite collaborators—Manilow Resident Director Mary Zimmerman, Artistic Associate Regina Taylor, and playwright Sarah Ruhl—and excited to welcome Thomas Bradshaw to the Goodman for the first time."

     

    The 2010-2011 Goodman Theatre Season

      Candide
      September and October, 2010 (Albert Theatre)
      Directed and adapted by Mary Zimmerman
    Music by Leonard Bernstein
    Book by Hugh Wheeler
    New adaptation by Mary Zimmerman
      Tony Award and MacArthur "Genius" Award-winning director Mary Zimmerman’s breathtaking new production of Candide is the theatrical event of the season. In addition to the music of Leonard Bernstein, Candide features contributions from the greatest lyricists of the 20th century, from Richard Wilbur to Stephen Sondheim. In this racy musical satire, naive Candide is banished for romancing the Baron’s daughter, only to be plagued by a series of absurd hardships that challenge his optimistic outlook of life and love.
       
      The Seagull
      October and November, 2010 (Owen Theatre)
      by Anton Chekhov
    Directed by Robert Falls
      Goodman Artistic Director Robert Falls directs an intimate new production of Chekhov’s masterwork The Seagull, whose unforgettable characters reveal the passion and pathos of everyday life. When famed actress Irina visits her family with her young lover Trigorin in tow, they become ensnared in a tragicomic tangle of romance, intrigue and unrequited love. Don’t miss this unique opportunity to experience a 20th century masterpiece, interpreted by one of America’s outstanding directors—in the Owen Theatre.

       
      Rain
      January and February, 2011 (Albert Theatre)
      by Regina Taylor
    A World Premier
      Rain is Regina Taylor‘s most personal and intimate work to date. Fiercely independent Iris has made a successful life for herself as a journalist in New York City, but when her marriage fails, she begins to unravel. In search of solace, Iris returns to her mother’s house in Texas, but her homecoming proves more confounding than consoling when her mother makes a shocking announcement. As long-buried family secrets come to light, Iris must face her past and make some difficult decisions about the future.
       
      Mary
      February and March, 2011 (Owen Theatre)
      by Thomas Bradshaw 
    Directed by May Adrales
    A World Premiere
      Outrageous. Ruthless. Explosive. Named "Best Provocative Playwright" by The Village Voice, Thomas Bradshaw pulls no punches in his comic absurdist drama Mary. At the height of what Time magazine dubbed "AIDS hysteria" in 1983, college student David invites his boyfriend home to his parents’ house in Virginia where nothing has changed since the 1800s—including the slave quarters. Confronting hypocrisy and oppression with exhilarating wit, Bradshaw’s incendiary work is "likely to leave you speechless!" (The New York Times).
       
      Stage Kiss
      March and April, 2011 (Albert Theatre)
      by Sarah Ruhl 
    A World Premiere Goodman Theatre commission
      In this quirky new comedy by MacArthur "Genius" Award-winner Sarah Ruhl, art imitates life—or is it the other way around? When ex-lovers HE and SHE are thrown together as romantic leads in an outrageously dreadful melodrama, they quickly lose touch with reality as the story onstage begins to follow them offstage. Stage Kiss is a hilarious, off-beat fairy-tale about what happens when lovers share a stage kiss-or when actors share a real one.

    An Opening Benefit launches the milestone season on Monday, September 27 at the Art Institute of Chicago’s Modern Wing—the location of the theater’s former home of 75 years. Honored will be those who paved the way for the new Goodman and made possible its myriad artistic, economic and community engagement achievements over the past decade. The evening will culminate with a performance of Candide. For tickets and more information about the Season Opening Benefit, call 312.443.5564. This will be the first in a season-long series of commemorative happenings.

    Upcoming productions in the 2009/2010 Season include:  the world premiere of the Goodman commissioned A True History of the Johnstown Flood by Rebecca Gilman, directed by Robert Falls (March 13 – April 18, 2010 in the Albert); The Good Negro by Tracey Scott Wilson, directed by Chuck Smith (May 1 – June 6, 2010 in the Albert); and The Sins of Sor Juana by Karen Zacarías, directed by Henry Godinez (June 19 – July 25, 2010 in the Albert) which launches the Goodman’s 5th Latino Theater Festival.

    Continue reading

    Sunday Night Sondheim: Anyone Can Whistle – Cleo Laine

    Though I don’t get her leopard “jumpsuit” or some of the staging, Cleo Laine really gives us a wonderful performance with this somewhat obscure song from a rarely produced Stephen Sondheim show with the same title: “Anyone Can Whistle”  Below the video I’ve attached several YouTube comments that are quite informative and insightful.

    Question: I adore Sondheim and his work, and almost always understand it (even the most complex) but for some reason I never understood this song. Any explanations?

    The character in the musical (Anyone Can Whistle) is singing about how she can do hard things without problem or error, but the simple things she wishes she could do, she cannot. "What’s hard is simple, what’s natural comes hard." She’s unable to let go of her troubles and she wishes someone could show her how to do that.

    From what I read the song is allegorical to the composer’s own insecurities. How many other songs deal with this subject? A masterful yet simplistic and touching song.

    I agree. I love it, it’s a shame that it’s so obscure.
    I believe it’s about how for somewhat uptight people like Faye (the character), the most challenging things in life (dancing a tango, reading Greek) come natural to them because it actually requires heavy thinking. But an act as easy as whistling (which anyone can do), Faye can’t do it because all it requires is carefree-ness.

    and of course whistling is also a metaphor for that simple thing of falling in love which she also finds hard even though she’s desperate to. such a wonderful way of putting it!

    Makes me feel like shes packing up to go, maybe begin another life, another time and place, or leaving to go be herself and wander. Gives me hope somewhat in knowing so.

    Sunday Night Sondheim: Bring Me My Bride

    Something Happened on the Way to the Forum

    “Bring Me My Bride”

    Roman Captain Miles Gloriosos portrayed as comically under-tall by actor Ed Huether. Directed by Bob Butterley.

    Sunday Night Sondheim: Agony (from Into The Woods)

     

    YouTube video – “Agony”

    “Agony” from Stephen Sondheim’s Into the Woods.

    This recording is from October 2006 at Greenville Little Theatre in Greenville, NC – Will Ragland as Cinderella’s prince, and Peter Simms as Rapunzel’s prince.

    NOTE: I have to say this is the most beautiful set I’ve ever seen for this show.  Well done Greenville!

    Sunday Night Sondheim: *Frogs* Opening Fanfare

    Frogs – “Opening Fanfare" featuring Nathan Lane