REVIEW: Glitter in the Gutter (Annoyance Theatre)

Filthy. Gorgeous. A bit of a Drag.

glitter-gutter photo: Zach Dodson

Annoyance Theatre presents:

Glitter in the Gutter

**The first and only live Drag Queen Sitcom**

written and directed by Kellen Alexander
through March 11 (more info)

By Keith Ecker

Who among us has not pondered the secret lives of drag queens? When the lights at the cabaret fade and the bar lets its regulars loose upon the night, where does the entertainment go? And what of the less successful divas, those that harbor Ru Paul dreams while clunking around in chintzy platform heels?

Glitter in the Gutter, a new play produced by Annoyance Productions and directed and written by Kellen Alexander, tells this story. Or to be more precise, it tells the story of two particular drag queens who are tragically trashy, down on their luck and caught on the cusp of eviction.

glitter-poster The play opens on the shared apartment of Pepper LaRoo (Seth Dodson) and Velveeta Fitzgerald (Wes Perry). Pepper, slender, graceful and nursing a throbbing head, is the Patsy to Velveeta’s somewhat more grounded Edina (see AbFab). The headache interferes with Pepper’s memory of the night prior, but she does recall meeting a man whose number she stored in her phone.

Enter Beverly Poon (Sarah Fineout), a rival performer with a voice that sounds like she’s gargling gravel. It is through her that Pepper discovers the man she met the night before was none other than Vinnie Cancer (Ben Kass), a famous record producer. Of course, this sends Pepper and Velveeta into a tizzy. They decide to invite Vinnie over for a date with the ulterior motive of landing a record contract.

When Vinnie stops by, he hands Pepper a slip of paper to fulfill her wish. Wanting a piece of the fame pie, Velveeta attempts to woo Vinnie to sign her as well. Caring more for image than talent, Vinnie lets Velveeta down hard. Little does Vinnie know that his newfound flame can move her mouth to music but is completely tone deaf.

Scorned, Velveeta runs away from home. She befriends a bag lady (Rachel Reed) in the alley out back and settles down for a life of domesticity and Dumpsters.

The play is the kind of over-the-top, absurdist comedy reminiscent of Charles Busch or John Waters . It’s campy, it’s crass and it’s unapologetically gay. But wash off the rouge and the eye shadow, and the play’s flaws become more apparent.

Although Alexander is obviously talented—he, along with Dodson, are part of the phenomenal improv group 1, 2, 3, Fag! — he seems overwhelmed with managing writing and directing duties. Likely unable to give both adequate attention, the writing and the pacing of the play suffer from a lack of concision.

Jokes that would otherwise kill fall flat when the punch line gets lost in a tangle of words. Also, too often too much is said that could easily have been accomplished with action. This slows down the pacing of the overall play, making the first act in particular feel like a drag.

It is in the subtleties that Alexander excels. One of the funniest parts of the play is when Officer Rick Pony (Alex Moffat) makes his entrance wearing roller shoes. No dialogue needed. The same goes with the inclusion of a window that is operated off stage by a pulley. It’s a simple and cheesy stage piece that serves a purpose and is used to great comedic effect.

Dodson and Perry are both talented actors. Dodson’s delivery and soft-spokenness, his agile dance moves and his comedic timing make him an attention magnet. Perry, who sounds an awful lot like Mrs. Garrett from the Facts of Life, has a strong voice and a commanding presence as well.

I have to give special recognition to Reed, whose deadpan portrayal of an off-kilter homeless woman is a scene-stealer. She also is fortunate to have the best dialogue in the entire play.

If Glitter in the Gutter aspires to be in the same ranks as other campy classics, it misses its mark. But it’s an entertaining piece none-the-less that is sure to please fans of kitsch and drag.

Rating: ★★½

Related article: Timeout Chicago’s Taking Out The Trash

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Review: Jackalope Theatre’s “Moonshiner”

Jackalope Theatre Sets the Right Period Mood for Moonshiner

Moonshiner

Jackalope Theatre presents

Moonshiner
by Andrew Burden Swanson
directed by Gus Menary
thru Saturday, August 29th (buy tickets)

Reviewed by Paige Listerud

Moonshiner, a world premiere play by breakout playwright Andrew Burden Swanson, has a lot going for it. Under the direction of Gus Menary, its talented cast invests its characters with all the heft and vitality needed to steer what could have been a thoroughly maudlin work toward deeper grounding in American realism. Swanson’s strengths as a young playwright demonstrate the capacity to maintain a strong dramatic arc that builds tension and suspense without sacrificing character development. But perhaps the most inspired choice by Jackalope Theatre Company in setting the play was selecting the EP Theatre space (map) for its second full-length production.

Moonshiner Everything at the EP space contributes to the production’s Prohibition Era atmosphere–from its pressed tin ceiling to the smell of wood to its molded, movie palace faces and, finally, to its lack of air conditioning. So wear light, comfortable clothing, and be ready to fan yourself like a Southern lady, because there is more than enough here to transport an audience back to rural 1930s Tennessee. Special mention goes to sound designer Justin Cyrul for creating the perfect music to sustain the mood.

Carl (Chris Chmelik) and Isaac (Jeremy Khan) are two cousins just getting by in the Depression on Carl’s clandestine rum running and Isaac’s ownership of the house that they live in together. But conflicting forces conspire to tear apart what little they have of family life.

The mercenary Mrs. Cartwright (Patti Roeder) has her eye on Isaac’s property and may think him an easy mark because of his blindness. Her niece Constance (Caroline Neff) spares nothing in warning Isaac of her aunt’s true intentions and Isaac’s blindness merely covers a deeper innate gift all his own. Meanwhile, Carl’s illegal activities meet further complications upon the revelation that the sheriff’s daughter has gone missing.

Menary does a great job enjoining his cast to keep it real. Some of the roles in Swanson’s work are stock Southern characters dangerously bordering on stereotype. So we have Forsythe (James Erico) and Gabbleman (Jim Elder) as the polite, but corrupt and menacing, sheriff’s deputies; Virgil (Wes Perry) as a bit of a Bubba, and Mrs. Cartwright as the typical, hypocritical church lady. What prevents the play from becoming trite is both the direction and the psychological pithiness and humor of Swanson’s dialogue. He shows that he can write characters that go against the predictable grain with Carl’s moonshiner boss, Dwayne (Bill Hyland), and the feisty, independent niece, Constance. The role of Isaac could have devolved into stereotype, but is spared that by an intelligent, deeply humanizing performance by Khan.

But Carl may be the masterpiece of characterization in the play and Chmelik portrays his erotic, troubled, and mercurial nature right up to its suspenseful end. Here is where all the efforts to manifest a cohesive, realist, ensemble work pay off and the entire cast and crew can take pride in their achievement. The only thing lacking over all may be in pacing. The slower lifestyle of the rural South shouldn’t be replicated in dramatic time on the stage.

With action sequences that include fights (fight choreography by Ryan Bourque) and gunfire, you’ve got a play that could very well translate to film. But I hope Swanson keeps his talent in Chicago just a little longer. I also hope Jackalope Theatre’s career is a long one, especially if it keeps producing original works like this one that are “deeply rooted in the American mythos.”

Rating: «««½